How to mandate agility in software development, operations, and data science

Even when leaders proclaim in their townhalls that your organization needs to be more agile and nimble, they can’t mandate it. Your CIO and IT leaders may standardize on practices, metrics, and responsibilities that they describe as agile methodology standards, but they can’t dictate that everyone adopts agile cultures and mindsets.

You can select agile tools, automate more with devops practices, and enable citizen data science programs, but you can’t force adoption and demand employee happiness. IT operations may operate a hybrid multicloud architecture, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that costs are optimized or that infrastructure can scale up and down auto-magically.

So, if you were looking to quickly standardize your agile processes, or to miraculously address technical debt by shifting to agile architectures, or to instantly transform into an agile way of working, then I am sorry to disappoint you. Agility doesn’t come free, cheap, or easily. You can’t

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Biggest-ever Arctic science mission ends after a year drifting along with frozen sea ice



a group of people standing on top of a snow covered mountain: Biggest-ever Arctic science mission ends after a year drifting along with frozen sea ice


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Biggest-ever Arctic science mission ends after a year drifting along with frozen sea ice

After a year spent drifting across the top of the world, frozen in sea ice, a German research ship returned home Monday, ending the largest Arctic science expedition in history, one aimed at better understanding a region that is rapidly changing as the world warms.

The ship, the Polarstern, docked at its home port of Bremerhaven nearly 13 months after it left Norway. In October, it became deliberately frozen into the ice north of Siberia, about 350 miles from the North Pole, and drifted north and west for thousands of miles, leaving the little remaining ice for good late last month between Greenland and Norway.

The expedition, with a rotating contingent of about 100 scientists, technicians and crew, encountered nosy polar bears, fierce storms that damaged equipment, changing ice conditions and, most

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The ur-Iris likely had purple flowers, pollinated by insects for nectar

IMAGE

IMAGE: Selected Iris species. (A) I. atropurpurea; (B) I. bismarckiana; (C) I. fulva; (D) I. historio; (E) I. loretti; (F) I. lutescens; (G) I. mesopotamica;
(H) I. petrana; (I) I. pumila; (J)…
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Credit: The authors

The genus Iris of flowering plants — named after the Greek rainbow goddess because of the variation in flower color — comprises over 300 species across the northern hemisphere, some of which are Vulnerable or (Critically) Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Due to the poor fossil record, it is not yet known when irises first originated, but scientists believe the genus is only a few million years old, having its closest living relatives in today’s southern Africa.

“We wanted to study the factors influencing and maintaining the outstanding evolutionary divergence in irises, a young but very diverse group. We were especially interested in the evolution of flower color and

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Aroostook County, Maine, is home to the largest 3D model of the solar system in the Western Hemisphere

Aroostook County, Maine, is home to the largest 3D model of the solar system in the Western Hemisphere

US News and World Report recently named Aroostook’s Maine School of Science and Mathematics one of the best high schools in the country and if this has your inner science nerd excited, watch a local scientist lead us on a tour of the solar system.


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MATHEMATICS HELPS IT SHINE. >> MORE FROM THE JUST HOW FAR IS IT FILE. FOLKS LIVING IN PRESQUE ISLE, AROOSTOOK’S BIGGEST TOWN, ARE FARTHER NORTH THAN HALF OF ALL CANADIANS, THE MAJORITY OF WHOM LIVE ALONG CANADA’S SOUTHERN BORDER. A PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL WOULD SEEM AN UNLIKELY CANDIDATE FOR NATIONAL ACCLAIM. MAIN SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS. RANKED THE SECOND BEST PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL IN THE COUNTRY BY U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT. >> YOU’VE GOT

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Colleges Pledged to Follow the Science. But Divides in Reopening Plans Reflected State Politics.

Institutional decisions about whether to reopen colleges in-person this fall correlated most strongly with state politics, not the regional public-health conditions that campus leaders said were front and center in their considerations, new research suggests.

The finding, from a pre-peer-review research and policy brief published by the College Crisis Initiative at Davidson College, reveals that both public and private institutions in Republican-led states were less likely to say in early August they would operate online this fall. County case numbers of Covid-19 did not have as strong of a correlation to campus decisions.

Public four-year universities in states with Republican governors were nine percentage points more likely to plan to be in person.

Over the summer, administrators cited their on-campus public-health expertise and data on the pandemic as central to decisions. But researchers found little evidence that state and county case rates were a “strong piece” of decision making, broadly.

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CBRE highlights 6 markets with rapidly growing life science clusters

  • Life science real estate is hot, with the lab space square footage growing by almost 12% across the US in the last year, according CBRE report detailing growth in the largest biotech clusters. 
  • CBRE’s report highlighted the 13 largest biotech clusters and the top 10 emerging clusters, showing how record amounts of funding from the National Insitutes of Health and venture capital are translating to the real estate markets.
  • Business Insider highlighted 6 clusters that are seeing large amounts of growth, whether they’re established but growing very rapidly, like New York City, or they’re emerging, like Pittsburgh and Houston.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Real estate to house pharmaceutical, biotech, and other medical research professionals is growing at a rapid pace and rents continue to rise, a sign that tenant demand can support the increasing attention on life sciences from institutional investors and developers. 

Lab space has grown

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U.S. Auction Theorists Win the 2020 Nobel in Economics

Two American economists, Paul R. Milgrom and Robert B. Wilson, were awarded the Nobel in economic science on Monday for improvements to auction theory and inventions of new auction formats — innovations that have had huge practical applications when it comes to allocating scarce resources.

The pair, close collaborators who are both affiliated with Stanford University, have pioneered new auction formats that governments have since used to auction off radio frequency.

“They haven’t just profoundly changed the way we understand auctions — they have changed how things are auctioned,” said Alvin E. Roth, a Nobel laureate himself who was one of Mr. Wilson’s doctoral students. “The two of them are some of the greatest theorists living in economics today.”

Auctions help to sell a variety of products, including art, minerals and online advertising. They can also take on various characteristics: Objects can have a shared, common value for all bidders

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3 Levittown High-Schoolers Recognized For Excellence In Science

LEVITTOWN, NY — Three Levittown high-schoolers were recently honored for the accomplishments in science. Neither the summer nor the coronavirus pandemic could slow down General Douglas MacArthur High School senior Emily Zhang, junior Summer Looney and sophomore Natalia Pszeniczny. The trio was recognized by different organizations for their exceptional research skills.

Zhang spent her summer working remotely at the Garcia Center for Polymers at Engineered Interfaces at Stony Brook University. Along with students from across the globe, she researched about graphene oxide coated anion exchange membrane fuel cells. On Sept. 23, her abstract, titled “Effect of pH on the Shear Modulus of Anion Exchange Membranes,” was accepted to the Materials Research Society’s annual conference. She was also a member of a group that prepared an abstract regarding ethical considerations in response to COVID-19.

Looney’s peer-reviewed research paper, “Public Awareness and Support of Town of Hempstead Preserves and Nature Areas,” was

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Some U.S. doctors flee to New Zealand where the coronavirus outbreak is under control and science is respected

  • Some U.S.-based doctors and nurses are fleeing the country because the lack of PPE and coordinated U.S. response made them feel unsafe during the coronavirus pandemic. 
  • Some have been feeling burned out for years due to the complex U.S. health system.
  • New Zealand, which led with science, has declared victory over Covid-19 yet again and hasn’t reported a positive case in more than a week. 



Jacinda Ardern holding a sign posing for the camera: Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern speaks to media at a press conference ahead of a nationwide lockdown at Parliament on March 25, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand.


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Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern speaks to media at a press conference ahead of a nationwide lockdown at Parliament on March 25, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand.

Dr. Judy Melinek knew it was time to make a change when she started to fear for her health and safety.

While working as acting chief forensic pathologist for Alameda County in California, she read early reports about a virus in Wuhan, China. By June, after repeatedly sounding the alarm about the need for

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What’s The Secret To Happiness? Borgo Egnazia In Italy Has Some Answers

Soon after I learned about the Happiness Break at Borgo Egnazia—one of my favorite resorts in Italy, and in fact in the world—I booked a trip to Puglia. This is 2020, after all, and we could all use some help with happiness.

I was also intrigued by the premise. Plenty of spas promise wellness. Not so many emphasize happiness as a skill and a practice that can be developed and nurtured. But here was a place that was touting its bona fides in the science of happiness.

And while I love a good boot camp, detox or jump-start-style health retreat, I also liked the idea of a program that would be adding to my life, not taking anything away. After two months of confinement this spring, I wasn’t particularly interested in cutting anything else out of my life.

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