Ultrafast fiber laser produces record high power

lasertag
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

Researchers have developed an ultrafast fiber laser that delivers an average power more than ten times what is available from today’s high-power lasers. The technology is poised to improve industrial-scale materials processing and paves the way for visionary applications.


Michael Müller, a Ph.D. student of Prof. Jens Limpert from the Friedrich Schiller University’s Institute of Applied Physics and the Fraunhofer Institute of Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering in Jena, Germany, will present the new laser at the all-virtual 2020 OSA Laser Congress to be held 12-16 October. The presentation is scheduled for Tuesday, 13 October at 14:30 EDT.

High power without the heat

In lasers, waste heat is generated in the process of light emission. Laser geometries with a large surface-to-volume ratio, such as fibers, can dissipate this heat very well. Thus, an average power of about 1 kilowatt is obtained from today’s high-power

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Mars will burn bright in the sky tonight as it reaches opposition

Ultra realisic 3d rendering of Mars and Milky way in the backround. Image uses large 46k textures for detailed appereance of the planet surface. Elements of this image furnished by NASA.
Mars will burn brightly in the sky as it reaches opposition (Getty/NASA)

Mars will shine in the sky on Tuesday night as the planet lines up with Earth, looking big and bright as it reaches “opposition”.

Every 26 months, the two planets move close together, until Earth lines up with Mars on the same side of the sun. 

Tuesday night sees the moment of opposition, with the planets lining up at just after 11pm. 

At that point, Mars should be visible to the south east from the UK, astrophotographer Damian Peach told the BBC. 

Peach said, “Even at nine or 10 o’clock in the evening, you’ll easily see it over in the southeast. You can’t miss it, it’s the brightest star-like object in that part of the sky.”

The Red Planet actually made its closest approach to our planet on 6 October, when it was 38,586,816 miles away from Earth

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Foldax Named Cardiovascular Device Company of the Year by MedTech Outlook

Foldax® announced today that it has been selected as Company of the Year among 10 cardiovascular device company finalists by MedTech Outlook Magazine. Foldax was honored for its innovative Tria™ heart valve, the first biopolymer heart valve to receive FDA approval for a U.S. clinical trial.

Foldax has reinvented every aspect of the artificial heart valve – from material to design to manufacturing – to develop surgical and transcatheter valves designed to last a lifetime that address historical tradeoffs. The Tria heart valve is made with its proprietary LifePolymer™ biopolymer that, combined with an innovative valve design, is intended to eliminate calcification, withstand stresses and strains in the heart without failure, and restore patient quality of life without lifelong anticoagulant use.

Tria is also the first and only heart valve to be robotically manufactured, reducing variability and enabling high precision, repeatability and quality, while substantially improving the economics of heart

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USAJOBS Being Made More User Friendly

USAJOBS, the federal government’s website for job openings, is being revised to make it easier to find and apply for openings.

More than 500 federal agencies use USAJOBS to

post job opportunities covering over 600 occupations ranging from student and entry-level jobs to federal executive positions.

Last year in excess of 325,000 jobs that received 17.5 million applications were posted on the site.

Early in this federal fiscal year, which started the first of this month, the portal is planned to include a job status indicator for each listing that would include the number of applicants, the when the job was filled and other information, according to a new report from the Government Accountability Office on the site.

The change would improve transparency and accountability and provide applicants with updates at each stage of the hiring process, the Office of Personnel Management, which runs the site, told GAO.

The coming

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Bezos’ Blue Origin conducts successful test flight for tourism rocket

Jeff Bezos, founder of Blue Origin, at New Shepard's West Texas launch facility
Jeff Bezos, founder of Blue Origin, at New Shepard’s West Texas launch facility

Blue Origin, the US space company founded by billionaire Jeff Bezos, succeeded Tuesday in its latest test flight of its rocket aimed at one day taking tourists to space, even as the date of the first crewed launch remains unclear.

The New Shepard capsule, which was propelled over the boundary of space by a small reusable launch vehicle that returned to land vertically, will one day carry up to six passengers.

It attained an altitude of 66 miles (106 kilometers) above sea level, before descending back to the surface using parachutes and landing in a cloud of dust in the desert of West Texas.

Its total flight time was 10 minutes and nine seconds.

Blue Origin previously unveiled the capsule’s interior: six seats with horizontal backrests, placed next to large portholes, in a futuristic cabin with swish

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U.S. and other nations sign Artemis Accords for moon missions

Artemis moon mission
An artist’s conception shows surface operations on the moon. (NASA Illustration)

Seven nations have signed up with the United States to participate in NASA’s Artemis effort to put astronauts on the moon by as early as 2024.

The Artemis Accords commit the signatories — including Australia, Britain, Canada, Japan, Italy, Luxembourg and the United Arab Emirates as well as the U.S. — to observe a set of principles ranging from the interoperability of space hardware to the protection of heritage sites and space property rights.

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine and other international representatives announced the signing of the accords today in conjunction with this week’s International Astronautical Congress.

During a briefing with reporters, Bridenstine said the accords will serve as the “preamble of bilateral agreements between the United States and all of our international partners as we go sustainably to the moon with commercial and international partners.”

It’ll be up

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Climate Change Could Make Yellowstone’s Famous Geyser Less Faithful | Smart News

Yellowstone National Park’s famous Old Faithful geyser is famously reliable, firing a jet of scalding water and steam high into the air some 17 times a day at 60 to 110-minute intervals.

But new research suggests that 800 years ago a severe drought caused this geyser, which was once somewhat hyperbolically known as “Eternity’s Timepiece,” to stop erupting altogether for many decades, reports Colin Barras for Science. When taken with climate model predictions of increasingly severe droughts, the findings could mean that America’s most dependable geyser will erupt less often or stop completely in the future.

Researchers arrived at the new findings, published last week in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, by studying 13 chunks of petrified wood found on Old Faithful’s mound. Trees can’t survive the geyser’s blasts of super-heated, alkaline water, so finding trees growing on Old Faithful’s mound is a sign that its regularly scheduled

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The 2015 US Disaster That Revolutionized Ship Crash Investigations

The police in Mauritius investigating the grounding of the oil spill ship, the Wakashio, revealed late last week that they were unable to obtain sound from the ship’s black box. 

That is not surprising, given how ship black boxes are configured, often with multiple microphones plugged in, recording to several audio tracks simultaneously. However, this only makes the case stronger

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Study Suggests A Supernova Exploded Near Earth About 2.5 Million Years Ago, Possibly Causing An Extinction Event

Supernovas are amazingly bright explosions of massive stars at the end of their lives. During the gravitational collapse, the outer layers of the star are pushed away, and chemical elements formed inside the dying star are released into space. This cosmic dust rains down onto the Earth continuously, eventually becoming part of sediments deposited in the sea.

Research published in the journal Physical Review Letters used the concentrations of elements formed in an exploding star and preserved in oceanic sediments to hypothesize that a supernova exploded near Earth just 2.5 million years ago.

The authors, led by Dr. Gunther Korschinek from the Technical University of Munich, focused their study on ferromanganese crusts

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How Sponges Will Inspire Tall Structures

marine sponge inspires skyscraper construction

Ozgur Donmaz/Getty/Matheus Fernandes/Harvard SEAS

  • Sea sponges have inspired a new double lattice for construction.
  • Animal-inspired technology, especially from creatures that build and weave, is huge right now.
  • The sponge-inspired lattice resisted buckling longer than any other structure.

    The next generation of skyscrapers could be, well, spongey. Researchers at Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences say a lattice reinforced with diagonals, inspired by the structures built by sponges, could mean lighter, but stronger skyscrapers and bridges.

    You love badass builds. So do we. Let’s nerd out over them together.

    Sponges are wild. They’re not just alive—they’re resilient predators that reproduce sexually, despite having no organs or tissues or even a traditional “inside” of their body structures. In a way, they’re living structures already, and their sturdiness is what helps them survive.

    The researchers explain in their new

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