ISS Moves To Avoid Space Debris

Astronauts on the International Space Station carried out an “avoidance maneuver” Tuesday to ensure they would not be hit by a piece of debris, said US space agency NASA, urging better management of objects in Earth’s orbit.

Russian and US flight controllers worked together during a two-and-a-half-minute operation to adjust the station’s orbit and move further away, avoiding collision.

The debris passed within about 1.4 kilometers (nearly one mile) of the ISS, NASA said.

The International Space Station -- seen here on August 26, 2020 -- is performing a maneuver to ensure it gets out of the way of a piece of space debris The International Space Station — seen here on August 26, 2020 — is performing a maneuver to ensure it gets out of the way of a piece of space debris Photo: NASA / Handout

The three crew members — two Russians and an American — relocated to be near their Soyuz spacecraft as the maneuver began so they could evacuate if necessary, NASA said, adding that the precaution was taken “out of an abundance of caution.”

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Whale beaching: An enduring mystery

By Paulina Duran

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Rescuers are trying to free a pod of long-finned pilot whales stranded off the Australian island of Tasmania. Around 470 whales are in the pod, more than half of which have already died, in one of the world’s biggest beachings.

WHY DO WHALES BEACH THEMSELVES?

It’s the question that has puzzled marine biologists for years, and continues to do so. Mass whale strandings have occurred throughout recorded modern history, and likely earlier.

“Strandings around the world are complete mysteries,” said Vanessa Pirotta, a Sydney-based wildlife scientist.

While scientists don’t know the exact reason, they do know that whales – and dolphins, which are also prone to mass beaching – are very sociable animals. They travel together in pods, often following a leader, and are known to gather around injured or distressed whales.

“There are many different factors that can cause a stranding,” said Australian

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ABP Publishing, a European Market Leader Audiobook Publisher, Rose Superior to Coronacrisis and Increased Sales 65%

Despite the necessity to change the company routine, the publishing house managed to increase performance twice during the lockdown.

ABP Publishing shares the results of the second quarter. They show a significant rise in popularity and interest to audiobooks.

Based on the financial reports for the second quarter, the sales increased 65% compared with the same period of the previous year. The most impressive results have been achieved in the French market with doubled sales.

Noteworthy, during the quarantine, the structure of the listeners’ interests has changed. For instance, the audiobooks in the category Relationships and parenting were bought by 50% more often than before the lockdown. The listeners who had to spend more time with their families were searching for ways of comfortable and mutually respected communication with their significant others. As judged by reviews, ABP Publishing audiobooks were immensely helpful in such an unusual situation.

Speaking of listeners’

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Bezos’ Blue Origin to set record with launch testing NASA moon mission hardware

blue-origin-image-4-ns12-6th-booster-landing

The sixth landing of the same New Shepard booster.


Blue Origin

Blue Origin, the space company founded and funded by Amazon head Jeff Bezos, is planning to make its 13th trip to space on Thursday, using a New Shepard rocket that will be flying for the seventh time, which will set a record for rocket recycling. 

Mission NS-13 will be carrying a dozen payload to the edge of space and back, including a lunar landing sensor demonstration that will test technologies for future moon missions as part of NASA’s Artemis program.

The sensor will be the first payload to ride mounted to the exterior of New Shepard rather than inside its capsule. 

SpaceX, another commercial space outfit headed by a famous billionaire in the form of Elon Musk, has so far used a

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Chromium steel was first made in ancient Persia

Chromium steel was first made in ancient Persia
Chahak people and the layer. Credit: Rahil Alipour, UCL

Chromium steel—similar to what we know today as tool steel—was first made in Persia, nearly a millennium earlier than experts previously thought, according to a new study led by UCL researchers.


The discovery, published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, was made with the aid of a number of medieval Persian manuscripts, which led the researchers to an archaeological site in Chahak, southern Iran.

The findings are significant given that material scientists, historians and archaeologists have long considered that chromium steel was a 20th century innovation.

Dr. Rahil Alipour (UCL Archaeology), lead author on the study, said: “Our research provides the first evidence of the deliberate addition of a chromium mineral within steel production. We believe this was a Persian phenomenon.

“This research not only delivers the earliest known evidence for the production of chromium steel dating back as early

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Experience, charisma will steer NASA’s choice for first woman moonwalker

Sept. 23 (UPI) — Experience, charisma — and previous exposure to radiation in space — will guide NASA’s history-making decision to choose the first woman who walks on the moon, according to those familiar with space agency operations.

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine has said the woman selected will be experienced and will have flown on space missions. Ten current astronauts meet that criteria, and more could soon.

In addition to expertise, NASA will look at the ability to perform well on high-profile missions and to connect with the public, space exploration observers said.

And, some of the most experienced astronauts could be ruled out if they have too much radiation exposure, according to space medicine experts.

Among the potential moon mission candidates, astronauts Christina Koch, 41, and Jessica Meir, 43, raised their profiles earlier this year by carrying out the first-ever all-female spacewalk while stationed on the International Space Station.

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When The CIA Considered Weaponizing Lightning

Thunderbolts are traditionally the weapon of the gods, but in 1967 the CIA were wondering whether they, too, could call down bolts of lightning from the heavens at will.

The idea is contained in a proposal from a scientist, sent to the CIA’s Deputy for Research ‘Special Activities’ and passed on to the chief of the Air Systems division. The scientist’s name has been redacted in the declassified document from the CIA’s archive, but the proposal mentions a previous discussion with the CIA, indicating they were being taken seriously.

The guided lightning concept is based on the observation that lightning follows a path of ionized air known as a step leader. Once the leader stroke reaches the ground and makes a circuit, the lightning proper is formed and a current flow, typically around 300 million Volts at 30,000 Amps.

The scientist suggests that artificial leaders could “cause discharges to occur

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Physicists develop printable organic transistors

Dresden physicists develop printable organic transistors
The team around Dr Hans Kleemann has succeeded for the first time in developing powerful vertical organic transistors with two independent control electrodes. Credit: IAPP

Scientists at the Institute of Applied Physics at TU Dresden have come a step closer to the vision of a broad application of flexible, printable electronics. The team around Dr. Hans Kleemann has succeeded for the first time in developing powerful vertical organic transistors with two independent control electrodes. The results have recently been published in the renowned online journal Nature Communications.


High-definition roll-up televisions or foldable smartphones may soon no longer be unaffordable luxury goods that can be admired at international electronics trade fairs. High-performance organic transistors are a key necessity for the mechanically flexible electronic circuits required for these applications. However, conventional horizontal organic thin-film transistors are very slow due to the hopping-transport in organic semiconductors, so they cannot be used for

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Why Warren Buffett’s way of beating the market will not be easily repeated

If you’re hoping that you’ll be the next Warren Buffett, I have some bad news for you.



Warren Buffett, Rebecca Quick standing in front of a crowd: Warren Buffett walks through the exhibit hall as shareholders gather to hear from the billionaire investor at Berkshire Hathaway's annual meeting in 2019. A new book lays out the reasons why Buffett's method of market success is increasingly hard to replicate, even for Buffett himself.


© Provided by CNBC
Warren Buffett walks through the exhibit hall as shareholders gather to hear from the billionaire investor at Berkshire Hathaway’s annual meeting in 2019. A new book lays out the reasons why Buffett’s method of market success is increasingly hard to replicate, even for Buffett himself.

If you’re hoping to pay an investment professional to outperform the market to the same extent that Buffett did, I’ve got more bad news.

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Buffett, CEO of Berkshire Hathaway and one of the greatest investors of all time, was a very rare bird. Active managers — i.e. professional stock pickers — are constantly claiming that they can outperform market benchmarks like the S&P 500, but they almost never do, particularly over periods of time that go beyond three or more years.

That’s

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Stellar winds hint at how planetary nebulae get their stunning shapes

In their dying throes, some stars leave behind beautiful planetary nebulae — disk, spiral or even butterfly-shaped clouds of dust and gas (SN: 5/17/18).

How these fantastically shaped clouds arise from round stars is a mystery. New observations of red giant stars suggest that massive planets or other objects orbiting dying stars help stir up stellar winds and shape planetary nebulae, researchers report in the Sept. 18 Science.

“We were wondering how stars can get these beautiful shapes,” says Leen Decin, an astrophysicist at KU Leuven in Belgium. So she and her colleagues examined 14 stars in the red giant phase, before they become planetary nebulae. Data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array in Chile revealed that stellar winds — fast-moving flows of gas, dust and subatomic particles such as protons — ejected from the red giant stars have different shapes, including spirals, disks and cones.

Mathematical

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