Poco confirms true Poco F1 successor is coming, addresses rebranding

A Poco F1 successor is reportedly coming.

  • A Poco executive has apparently claimed that a true Poco F1 successor is on the way.
  • The representative also addressed criticism of the brand’s rebranding strategy.
  • Poco will reportedly continue to offer rebranded devices in the future.

The Poco F2 Pro is one of the best affordable flagships in 2020, coming as a rebranded version of the China-only Redmi K30 Pro. Nevertheless, we thought it made all the right compromises for the price.

Still, the $500 price means that the Poco F2 Pro is significantly more expensive than the ~$300 Poco F1 launched back in 2018. Now, Poco country director Anuj Sharma has confirmed to The Indian Express that the Poco F2 Pro isn’t coming to India.

Furthermore, the Poco exec said a real successor to the Poco F1 is indeed coming:

The Poco F1 was a device that changed the market and consumers expect the same from the successor.

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Analysts Can’t Agree on What Prompted Big Spike in New Bitcoin Addresses

Bitcoin has seen a rapid rise in the creation of addresses on the blockchain so far this month, with one industry executive saying it’s likely due to traders moving funds off the legally troubled BitMEX exchange. Others point elsewhere.

  • The “entities net growth” metric from analytics firm Glassnode, which measures the daily change in unique entities or clusters of addresses controlled by a single participant, rose sharply by 244% from 9,750 to 33,620 in the first six days of October.
  • Tuesday’s tally of 33,620 was the highest since Oct. 3, 2018.
  • The surge in new entities noticeably picked up the pace in the wake of U.S. authorities’ recent decision to bring civil and criminal charges against cryptocurrency derivatives trading platform BitMEX and users’ resulting panicked migration of funds to other exchanges.
  • BitMEX has witnessed an outflow of at least 40,000 BTC (worth around $424 million at press time) since the
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Addresses major testing need in developing world; also in US, where reagent supplies are again dwindling — ScienceDaily

A major roadblock to large scale testing for coronavirus infection in the developing world is a shortage of key chemicals, or reagents, needed for the test, specifically the ones used to extract the virus’s genetic material, or RNA.

A team of scientists at the University of Vermont, working in partnership with a group at the University of Washington, has developed a method of testing for the COVID-19 virus that doesn’t make use of these chemicals but still delivers an accurate result, paving the way for inexpensive, widely available testing in both developing countries and industrialized nations like the United States, where reagent supplies are again in short supply.

The method for the test, published Oct. 2 in PLOS Biology, omits the step in the widely used reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test where the scarce reagents are needed.

92% accuracy, missing only lowest viral loads

The accuracy of

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