New ice-sheet ’emulator’ focuses on Antarctica — ScienceDaily

Projections of potentially dramatic sea-level rise from ice-sheet melting in Antarctica have been wide-ranging, but a Rutgers-led team has created a model that enables improved projections and could help better address climate change threats.

A major source of sea-level rise could come from melting of large swaths of the vast Antarctic ice sheet. Fossil coral reefs jutting above the ocean’s surface show evidence that sea levels were more than 20 feet higher about 125,000 years ago during the warm Last Interglacial (Eemian) period.

“Evidence of sea-level rise in warm climates long ago can tell us a lot about how sea levels could rise in the future,” said lead author Daniel M. Gilford, a post-doctoral associate in the lab of co-author Robert E. Kopp, a professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences within the School of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. “This evidence suggests that as climate

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Rising Temperature Could Melt Antarctica ‘Irreversibly’, Warns New Study

KEY POINTS

  • Researchers say melting Antarctic ice could raise sea level by 8 feet
  • Such a rise in sea levels would devastate coastal cities and cultural sites around the world
  • Study says the only solution is to bring the world’s temperature back to pre-industrial levels

Coastal cities and cultural sites around the world could soon be submerged in water if the melting of ice in Antarctica reaches an “irreversible” level. If global warming is allowed to continue unchecked, most of Antarctica will be gone forever, a new study warns.  

The melting of ice in Antarctica can make glaciers the size of Florida slide into the ocean, said Anders Levermann, a researcher at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany, and a co-author of the study. The team ran computer simulations to identify “where exactly and at which warming levels the ice in Antarctica would melt.”  

“We find that

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Antarctica, the only continent without coronavirus, braces for summer rotation

  • Antarctica, the coldest and most isolated part of the world, is the only continent still untouched by the coronavirus. 
  • But as Antarctica’s harsh winter comes to a close, critical global efforts are underway to ensure that incoming colleagues for the summer rotation do not bring Covid-19 to the continent. 
  • “It’s almost scary how lucky we are. Out of all the people on the planet, we’re the ones who aren’t experiencing it,” said Karin Jansdotter, who’s lived in an Antarctica research station for nearly a year. 



a close up of a car window: Antarctica Flights operates 12-hour sightseeing tours over the continent that take off and land on the same day.


© Provided by CNBC
Antarctica Flights operates 12-hour sightseeing tours over the continent that take off and land on the same day.

The coronavirus has ravaged the world now for nine months, with people across the globe enduring lockdowns of varying intensities, workplace and school shutdowns and restrictions on group gatherings. 

Yet there’s still one continent that’s been untouched by the virus: Antarctica, the

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What Research in Antarctica Tells Us about the Science of Isolation

Over the past few months, the phrase “social distancing” has entered our lexicon. Many of us have found ourselves separated from family and friends—or at least from our normal social lives. As humans grapple with pandemic-induced isolation, science is starting to offer insight into what may be happening in our brains when our social contact with others is dramatically reduced.

That insight happens to come from a place with more penguins than people.

Tim Heitland of the Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Center for Polar and Marine Research in Germany spent 14 months in Antarctica between 2016 and 2018. When he returned, daily life felt overwhelming—everything from the colors and vegetation to all the other people. Part of the shock may have come from returning with a different brain than the one he left with.

While the members of Heitland’s crew conducted research on the earth’s iciest continent, they themselves were

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