T-Mobile is expanding its rural home internet service to 450 more areas

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T-Mobile is bringing its LTE home internet service to more people.


Angela Lang/CNET

T-Mobile has announced an expansion of its Home Internet pilot to 450 more areas, which it says covers 20 million households. The service uses T-Mobile’s 4G LTE network, and was launched as an invite-only pilot in rural areas in March last year, with the carrier saying it’s now opening the service to non-T-Mobile customers.

T-Mobile’s home internet service is $50 per month, with a $0 hardware lease and no data caps.  

“We’re understanding this massive expansion … at a time when our connection to the Internet is so vital — for work, remote school, connection with family and friends,” said T-Mobile CEO Mike Sievert.

You can see a list of the new cities

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Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico areas to watch for tropical storms

Historically, hurricane season peaks about Sept. 10, activity typically in top gear leading into October. But this year’s hyperactive September came screeching to a halt Friday, when Teddy and Beta in the Atlantic and Lowell in the Pacific fizzled or lost tropical characteristics entirely. Since then, the world’s oceans have been virtually silent. But they won’t be for long.

A large zone of rising air at mid-to-upper levels of the atmosphere will soon overspread the Atlantic from the west, at the same time as global circulations favor an uptick in shower and thunderstorm activity. The two factors could overlap to bring about a renewal in tropical busyness.

An area to watch

The National Hurricane Center is already monitoring one area in the northwest Caribbean that could prove problematic in the coming week. The center estimates a 50-percent chance that tropical development will occur sometime in the next five days.

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Researchers concerned about prey and predator species in post-fire logging areas

UBCO researchers concerned about prey and predator species in post-fire logging areas
UBCO researchers say post-fire salvage logging destroys removes important regenerating habitat for a variety of species including the snowshoe hare. Credit: Angelina Kelly.

New research from UBC Okanagan shows that salvage logging on land damaged by wildfires has negative impacts on a variety of animals.


While post-fire salvage logging is used to mitigate economic losses following wildfire, Karen Hodges, a biology professor in the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science, says the compounded effects of wildfire and post-fire salvage logging are more severe than what wildlife experience from fire alone.

Wildfires have been increasing in prevalence and severity in recent decades, Hodges says, and salvaging trees after a fire is a common practice. However, the scale and intensity of post-fire logging removes important regenerating habitat for a variety of forest species.

“When trees are removed from a newly burned landscape, birds and mammals lose the last remnants of habitat,” she

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