Artists and Entrepreneurs Aren’t Happy With Twitter’s Efforts to Discourage Retweets

With less than a month until Election Day, Twitter announced it was upping its efforts to curb the spread of misinformation. But not everyone is happy with the approach.

On Friday, the social media giant revealed a set of temporary changes that discourages the use of the retweet function. Twitter claims the changes will make it much more difficult for users to spread false information related to the 2020 election, and will encourage users to be more considerate about the posts they share on their accounts.

“Twitter plays a critical role around the globe by empowering democratic conversation, driving civic participation, facilitating meaningful political debate, and enabling people to hold those in power accountable,” the company wrote in a blog. “But we know that this cannot be achieved unless the integrity of this critical dialogue on Twitter is protected from attempts — both foreign and domestic — to undermine

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8 wearable tech companies Google could buy that aren’t Fitbit

  • Google’s deal to buy Fitbit is on the ropes. Despite making concessions to appease regulators, competitors say it’s not enough.
  • But Fitbit isn’t the only wearable tech company that could help Google take the fight to Apple.
  • We asked analysts to pick out some other companies Google could potentially acquire if the Fitbit deal doesn’t go through – or even if it does.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

We’re approaching a year since Google declared its plan to acquire wearables company Fitbit for $2.1 billion, and the deal still hasn’t closed. 

The acquisition has been under intense scrutiny around the world, and right now European regulators are digging deep into the deal. Earlier this week it was reported that the merger could be close to clearing after Google offered some concessions to regulators, but Reuters now reports that rivals say these aren’t enough.

Google showed us this week

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Widespread wildfires in the far north aren’t just bigger; they’re different — ScienceDaily

“Zombie fires” and burning of fire-resistant vegetation are new features driving Arctic fires — with strong consequences for the global climate — warn international fire scientists in a commentary published in Nature Geoscience.

The 2020 Arctic wildfire season began two months early and was unprecedented in scope.

“It’s not just the amount of burned area that is alarming,” said Dr. Merritt Turetsky, a coauthor of the study who is a fire and permafrost ecologist at the University of Colorado Boulder. “There are other trends we noticed in the satellite data that tell us how the Arctic fire regime is changing and what this spells for our climate future.”

The scientists contend that input and expertise of Indigenous and other local and communities is essential to understanding and managing this global issue.

The commentary identifies two new features of recent Arctic fires. The first is the prevalence of holdover fires, also

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Executives Say Technology Will Boost Productivity; But Their Employees Aren’t So Sure

Fifteen years ago, one may have not recognized many of the career choices that are emerging today — such as cloud marketing manager, or data scientist. So, just imagine what job titles we might see fifteen years from now.

The authors of a report out of Citrix did just that — visualizing the workplace of the year 2035, and the types of professionals who will be making the economy tick. These new-age jobs will be tied into technology initiatives such as AI and related technologies.

The Citrix workplace study was the result of a year-long series of surveys and interviews with 1,800 business leaders, along with thought leaders from academia, think tanks, multinational boards, and leading authorities on the future of work. Here are examples of new jobs that will be created:

  • Robot/AI trainer
  • Virtual reality manager
  • Advanced data scientist
  • Privacy and
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Latest TSMC 7nm Data Proves Intel And Other Dinosaur Chipmakers Aren’t Even Close To Dying Yet. A Strong Base Of Revenues For TSMC (NYSE:TSM)

Where new school techies and old school dinosaur investors clash heads is on historical versus future success. No story is better represented by that than the still-smoldering battlefield between armchair investors about Intel (INTC) and AMD (AMD). I don’t need to educate most anyone about the scathing response by Wall Street to Intel’s production delay into 7nm. We don’t need a dissection of the stock chart for AMD to comprehend that they are currently priced to rob Intel of massive market share in processors.

I won’t take a stand on that hairy debate, or on other similar discussions that really illustrate the growing divide between “growth” and “value”, though the same nuts and bolts concept I provide with this analysis on TSMC’s (TSM) recent results can be applied to other hardware debates (and maybe one I can elaborate on if there’s enough interest):

  • Traditional servers IBM (IBM), Hewlett Packard Enterprise
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JPMorgan Says Usual Hedges Aren’t Working as They Once Did

(Bloomberg) — Safe-haven assets seen as traditional hedges aren’t panning out as they once did, according to JPMorgan Chase & Co.

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Easy-money policies may actually be keeping investors in cash and away from other traditional buffers, strategists led by John Normand wrote in a note Friday. That’s because such policies create a zero-yield environment where cyclical assets might be too difficult to hedge, they said.

This kind of conservative mindset may not become popular enough to affect the direction of risky markets, but it could discourage investors from deploying their cash into other asset classes, the strategists said.

“Defensive assets are delivering their weakest performance and therefore worst hedge protection of any equity sell-off in at least a decade,” Normand said. “The wall of cash some hypothesize will inevitably flow into equity, credit and EM may remain very high indefinitely.”

The S&P 500 index is down about 8%

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Razer’s new feature-packed, wireless gaming accessories aren’t cheap

Razer has released three new wireless gaming products, each in a different category. There’s the $179.99 BlackShark V2 Pro wireless gaming headset that is, in many ways, just like the BlackShark V2 — sans cable. It’s similarly a very comfortable headset that I’ve found easy to wear for hours on end without feeling fatigued or like my head is in a vice. Razer claims it can last up to 24 hours per charge, and the headset is rechargeable via a Micro USB port.

Razer BlackShark V2 Pro

The new BlackShark V2 Pro is just as comfortable as the wired version.
Image: Razer

The visual differences between this model and the $99.99 wired BlackShark V2 are very minor. The Pro has a black Razer logo on it instead of a green one, and it has a 3.5mm jack for wired listening.

It’s also debuting the DeathAdder V2 Pro, a wireless take on the mouse design

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