Eight nations sign NASA’s Artemis Accords that guide cooperative exploration of the moon

Eight countries have signed on as founding member nations to NASA’s Artemis Accords during the 71st International Astronautical Congress this week.



a couple of people that are standing in the dirt


© NASA


Those nations include Australia, Canada, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom and the United States of America.

NASA released the Artemis Accords in May to establish a framework of principles for safely and responsibly planning for humanity’s return to the moon.

“Artemis will be the broadest and most diverse international human space exploration program in history, and the Artemis Accords are the vehicle that will establish this singular global coalition,” said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine in a statement.

“With today’s signing, we are uniting with our partners to explore the Moon and are establishing vital principles that will create a safe, peaceful, and prosperous future in space for all of humanity to enjoy.”

It’s been more than a year since NASA and

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NASA announces eight-nation space coalition under ‘Artemis Accords’

While NASA is leading the Artemis program, it has emphasized the need for international partnerships in building up a sustainabl
While NASA is leading the Artemis program, it has emphasized the need for international partnerships in building up a sustainable presence on the Moon, something the agency views as key for building up its expertise ahead of a human mission to Mars

NASA announced on Tuesday that eight countries have signed an international agreement called the Artemis Accords that outlines the principles of future exploration of the Moon and beyond.


The treaty paves the way for its founding members—Australia, Canada, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, United Arab Emirates, Britain and the United States—to participate in NASA’s Artemis program, which aims to return humans to Earth’s nearest neighbor by 2024.

“Artemis will be the broadest and most diverse international human space exploration program in history, and the Artemis Accords are the vehicle that will establish this singular global coalition,” said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine.

“With today’s signing, we are uniting with our partners

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U.S. and other nations sign Artemis Accords for moon missions

Artemis moon mission
An artist’s conception shows surface operations on the moon. (NASA Illustration)

Seven nations have signed up with the United States to participate in NASA’s Artemis effort to put astronauts on the moon by as early as 2024.

The Artemis Accords commit the signatories — including Australia, Britain, Canada, Japan, Italy, Luxembourg and the United Arab Emirates as well as the U.S. — to observe a set of principles ranging from the interoperability of space hardware to the protection of heritage sites and space property rights.

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine and other international representatives announced the signing of the accords today in conjunction with this week’s International Astronautical Congress.

During a briefing with reporters, Bridenstine said the accords will serve as the “preamble of bilateral agreements between the United States and all of our international partners as we go sustainably to the moon with commercial and international partners.”

It’ll be up

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NASA reveals details of its Artemis mission to get first woman on the moon

nasadust

NASA’s Advanced Concepts Laboratory released this illustration of lunar dust.


NASA

In 2024, if NASA’s plans come to fruition, a woman will walk on the surface of the moon. NASA announced the plan last year, but offered an update Monday to its Artemis program, laying out steps to send astronauts back to the moon for the first time since 1972. 

The plan includes pairing the powerful Space Launch System rocket with an Orion spacecraft in an unmanned test flight next year. That mission will be called Artemis I. Artemis II will launch in 2023 with astronauts aboard who will fully test Orion’s navigational prowess. All of this will lead up to Artemis III in 2024. 

Artemis III will lay the groundwork for longer lunar missions and more surface exploration. NASA is sending scientific equipment

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NASA signs agreement with Italy to cooperate on Artemis

WASHINGTON — Italy is the latest country to sign an agreement to cooperate with NASA on the Artemis human lunar exploration program, although the details of Italy’s participation have yet to be worked out.

In a Sept. 25 ceremony held by videoconference, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine and Riccardo Fraccaro, undersecretary to Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte with responsibility for space, signed a joint declaration of intent to cooperate on Artemis.

“With a long history of successful collaboration in human spaceflight, as well as in Earth and space science, the Italian government’s strong support for Artemis assures this partnership will extend to cooperation in the next phase of exploration on the lunar surface,” Bridenstine said in a statement.

Neither NASA nor the Italian space agency ASI announced any specific projects that are part of that cooperative effort. In an Italian-language statement, Giorgio Saccoccia, president of ASI, said subsequent “implementation agreements” would

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NASA tests Artemis spacesuits underwater for possible moon landing

  • NASA is developing new spacesuits for its planned missions to the moon.
  • Astronauts are testing the spacesuits in a giant pool: the Neutral Buoyancy Lab in Houston, Texas.
  • The pool mimics the feeling of microgravity and serves as a training ground for astronauts learning how to do spacewalks. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

NASA is racing to get astronauts back to the moon in 2024. But before that can happen, the agency needs to perfect its spacesuits.

NASA has already designed the new suits that astronauts will wear on its Artemis moon missions. Now it’s testing the suits to make sure people can actually walk in them and perform complex tasks, like handling tools and checking equipment.

Many of those tests happen underwater.

At NASA’s Neutral Buoyancy Lab in Houston, Texas, astronauts-in-training wear spacesuits in a giant pool to simulate what they’ll feel like in microgravity.

The pool

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NASA releases Artemis mission plans to return astronauts to the moon

  • NASA just unveiled its first full plan for its Artemis program, a series of missions to return people to the moon for the first time since 1972.
  • The program would launch an uncrewed mission around the moon in 2021, followed by a crewed moon flyby in 2023, then a lunar landing in 2024.
  • The plan also calls for NASA and other agencies to set up a lunar base. 
  • But NASA needs $28 billion over the next four years to make Artemis happen.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

NASA has released its first full plan for its Artemis missions, which aim to put the first woman on the moon and the first man since 1972. 

The plan calls for a lunar landing in 2024, but before that, NASA intends to launch two other missions to the moon to test its new Orion spacecraft.

“Our plan to land the first

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