Central Asian horse riders played ball games 3,000 years ago — ScienceDaily

Researchers have investigated ancient leather balls discovered in the graves of horse riders in northwest China. According to the international research team, they are around 3,000 years old, making them the oldest balls in Eurasia. The find suggests amongst others that the mounted warriors of Central Asia played ball games to keep themselves fit.

Today, ball games are one of the most popular leisure activities in the world, an important form of mass entertainment and big business. But who invented balls, where and when? The oldest balls that are currently known about were made in Egypt about 4,500 years ago using linen. Central Americans have been playing ball games for at least 3,700 years, as evidenced through monumental ball courts made of stone and depictions of ball players. Their oldest balls were made of rubber. Until now, it was believed that ball games in Europe and Asia followed much later:

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World Beverage Can Ends Market Huge Incredible Growth by 2026 | Ball, Crown, Anhui Wonderful-wall Color Coating Aluminium Science Technology

IndexMarketsResearch.com offering a new research report on The“Global Beverage Can Ends Market by Distribution Channel and Geography – Global Trends, Analysis and Forecast 2020-2026”

A new research report released by Index Markets Research with the title “GlobalBeverage Can EndsMarket Size, Status and Forecast 2020-2026”. The report provides an overview of the growth rate of the Beverage Can Ends market during the forecast period, i.e., 2020–2026. Most significantly, the report further identifies the qualitative impact of variety market factors on market segments and geographies. The research segments the market on the basis of product type, application, technology, and region. To offer more clarity regarding the industry, the report takes a closer look at the current status of different factors including but not limited to supply chain management, niche markets, distribution channel, trade, supply, and demand and production capability across different countries.In the end, the report makes some important

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From ball launchers to activity trackers: the new breed of pet tech | Technology

Technology for pets is increasingly popular, with gadgets entering the market that promise to keep our dogs and cats in trim, healthy and occupied, and we pet owners in sync with their needs.

The increasing humanisation of pets means more and more of us are treating them as fluffy family members. Spending on cats and dogs has increased hand in hand with this trend. Total spending on pets in the UK reached a record high of £6.9bn in 2019, an increase of about £3.5bn since 2009, according to the Office for National Statistics.

Many gadgets that started out as human tech, such as activity trackers, have made the transition to the pet market.

PitPat activity tracker



Pets win prizes with the PitPat activity tracker. Photograph: PitPat

The excellent PitPat dog activity tracker has been designed in collaboration with vets. It clips on to collars and measures the time (rather than steps) your dog

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Palantir’s Crystal Ball Can’t Guarantee a Bright Future

(Bloomberg Opinion) — In a hot market for new technology stocks, it was Palantir Technologies Inc.’s turn in the spotlight on Wednesday. The debut wasn’t a complete show-stopper, and that’s fine — not everything can, or should, be a market darling. 

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The data-mining company, co-founded by billionaire and Donald Trump supporter Peter Thiel, went public through a direct listing and started trading at $10, above the New York Stock Exchange’s $7.25 reference price. A $10 price equates to a market value of about $22 billion on a fully diluted basis, which, while respectable, isn’t much higher than its last private fund-raising round in 2015 at $20 billion. Palantir traded as high as $11.42 on Wednesday before drifting back under $10 to close at $9.50.

Investors have been clamoring for new tech listings despite high stock valuations and the potential dampening effect of a second-wave virus outbreak. According to

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Soccer ball brings energy to developing world

(CBS News) The sOccket looks like an ordinary soccer ball, but it’s much more than that. It’s a power source for small electronic devices — something the developing world desperately needs.

The innovative ball is the brainchild of Harvard graduates Julia C. Silverman and Jessica O. Matthews, who came up with the idea while taking an engineering class for non-engineers. The class’ intent was to use art in science to bring change.

Both Silverman and Matthews have backgrounds with developing countries and used the stories of those areas in generating their idea. “Everybody (in the areas we wanted to target) had this strong love of soccer,” Silverman said. “But almost nobody has consistent access to electricity.”

How does the device work?

It harnesses kinetic energy using a stripped-down gyroscope inside the ball that’s rolling as the ball is rolling. The gyroscope harnesses the kinetic energy generated during play and stores

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