TikTok Gets Reprieve As Judge Halts Trump Download Ban

TikTok won a last-minute reprieve late Sunday as a US federal judge halted enforcement of a politically charged ban ordered by the Trump administration on downloads of the popular video app, hours before it was set to take effect.

District Judge Carl Nichols issued a temporary injunction at the request of TikTok, which the White House has called a national security threat stemming from its Chinese parent firm’s links to the Beijing government.

The opinion was sealed, so no reason for the decision was released in a brief order by the court in Washington. The judge may unseal portions of the order after consulting with lawyers from both sides.

The Trump administration order had sought to ban new downloads of the app from midnight (0400 GMT Monday) but would allow use of TikTok until November 12, when all usage would be blocked. The judge denied TikTok’s request to suspend the

Read More
Read More

Indian start-up ShareChat is one of many looking to fill the vacuum left by TikTok ban

  • ShareChat, a Twitter-backed Indian social media platform that caters to users in 15 regional languages, launched a short-video sharing app just days after New Delhi banned TikTok.
  • The app, Moj, now has more than 80 million monthly active users who spend on average 34 minutes on the platform, the company said. 
  • The TikTok ban left a vacuum that local start-ups are moving in to fill. 



a close up of a person wearing a mask: A girl wearing a protective mask depicting the TikTok logo poses for a picture in Mumbai, India, July 1, 2020.


© Provided by CNBC
A girl wearing a protective mask depicting the TikTok logo poses for a picture in Mumbai, India, July 1, 2020.

SINGAPORE — India’s ban of the popular short-video sharing app TikTok has left a vacuum that local start-ups are moving in to fill. 

Loading...

Load Error

One of those start-ups is ShareChat, a Twitter-backed Indian social media platform that caters to users in 15 regional languages.

Citing national security concerns, New Delhi announced the ban on TikTok, which is owned by Beijing-based

Read More
Read More

Judge temporarily halts Trump administration’s TikTok ban

A U.S. federal judge on Sunday partially granted TikTok’s preliminary injunction against a Trump administration order to ban downloads of the app, though more sweeping restrictions are still on track to take effect in November.

In his order, Judge Carl Nichols of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia said the temporary relief does not cover a pending service shutdown “at this time,” reports The New York Times.

“We’re pleased that the court agreed with our legal arguments and issued an injunction preventing the implementation of the TikTok app ban,” a spokesman for TikTok told the publication following news of the decision. “We will continue defending our rights for the benefit of our community and employees. At the same time, we will also maintain our ongoing dialogue with the government to turn our proposal, which the president gave his preliminary approval to last weekend,

Read More
Read More

TikTok Ban On Hold With Court Order

TikTok and its fans have gotten a reprieve from a ban just hours away on new downloads and updates of the short-video app by the Trump White House.

A federal judge in a rare Sunday hearing ordered a preliminary injunction for a recent ban on TikTok, just four hours before it’s first stage was set to take effect on Sunday by halting all updates to current users of the app. The ban was issued by the U.S. Department of Commerce, implementing an August executive order from President Trump that also calls for an outright ban to any use of TikTok in the U.S. on November 12 — if it’s not sold and effectively turned into a U.S. company by that time. TikTok’s current owner is ByteDance, a company based in China.

More from WWD

TikTok and ByteDance sued President Trump, the Commerce Department and its head Wilbur Ross the day

Read More
Read More

Judge halts Trump administration ban on TikTok downloads

A judge granted a preliminary injunction to video-sharing app TikTok on Sunday, blocking a ban on new downloads in the US that would have gone into effect at midnight. US District Judge Carl Nichols issued his decision just after 8PM ET, but his opinion has been sealed, pending review by the two sides’ attorneys.



logo


© Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge


Attorneys for TikTok argued Sunday morning during a dial-in hearing that a ban by the Trump administration would be “devastating,” and urged a judge to block it until the entire case can be decided. TikTok’s attorney said the ban that would prevent new downloads of TikTok from Apple and Google’s app stores at 11:59PM ET today was essentially “shutting down speech.” But the government’s lawyers argued that First Amendment claims by TikTok don’t apply, because the Trump administration considers the app a national security risk.

Loading...

Load Error

On

Read More
Read More

TikTok Wins Reprieve From U.S. Ban

A federal judge on Sunday granted a preliminary injunction against a Trump administration order to ban the viral video app TikTok from U.S. app stores, in a reprieve for the Chinese-owned service.

The injunction halts only the element of the ban scheduled to take effect Sunday at midnight, which would have forced TikTok off app stores run by companies like Apple and Google. It does not cover a broader set of restrictions set to take effect in November “at this time,” the judge, Carl Nichols of United States District Court for the District of Columbia, said in his order.

The government had argued that the measures were responding to fears that the app, which is owned by the Chinese company ByteDance, could send data back to authorities in Beijing. A Justice Department official, Daniel Schwei, said that TikTok’s “First Amendment rights are not implicated” by the ban.

Lawyers for the

Read More
Read More

Federal judge postpones Trump ban on popular app TikTok

The ruling followed an emergency hearing Sunday morning in which lawyers for TikTok argued that the administration’s app-store ban would infringe on First Amendment rights and do irreparable harm to the business.

Earlier this year, President Donald Trump declared that TikTok, owned by Chinese company ByteDance, was a threat to national security and that it must either sell its U.S. operations to American companies or be barred from the country.

TikTok is still scrambling to firm up a deal tentatively struck a week ago in which it would partner with Oracle, a huge database-software company, and Walmart in an effort to win the blessing of both the Chinese and American governments. In the meantime, it is fighting to keep the app available in the U.S.

TikTok said in a statement that it was pleased with the court ruling and continues to work to turn its deal proposal into an actual

Read More
Read More

U.S. Judge Halts Trump’s TikTok Ban, Hours Before It’s Set To Start : NPR

In this photo illustration a mobile phone screen displays TikTok logo in front of a keyboard.

Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency


hide caption

toggle caption

Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency

In this photo illustration a mobile phone screen displays TikTok logo in front of a keyboard.

Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency

A federal judge on Sunday temporarily blocked President Trump’s TikTok ban, granting a temporary reprieve to the wildly popular video-sharing app.

During a telephone court hearing on Sunday, lawyers for TikTok argued that Trump’s clampdown infringed on free speech and due process rights.

John Hall, an attorney for TikTok, argued that the app, with some 100 million American users, is a “modern day version of the town square” and shutting it down is akin to silencing speech.

Judge Carl Nichols of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, responded by halting the ban, which was set to kick in at midnight Sunday.

The

Read More
Read More

TikTok Creators Fail to Stop Pending Ban in U.S. App Stores

A judge denied an attempt by a group of TikTok creators to temporarily block the pending ban of the video-sharing app on U.S. app stores, which is set to happen within the day.

Douglas Marland, Cosette Rinab, and Alec Chambers said in a temporary restraining order request to the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania that they earn their living from TikTok, The Verge reported. Marland has 2.7 million subscribers, Rinab has 2.3 million subscribers, and Chambers has 1.8 million subscribers.

The three TikTok creators claimed that they will “lose access to tens of thousands of potential viewers and creators every month, an effect amplified by the looming threat to close TikTok altogether.”

Judge Wendy Beetlestone admitted that TikTok’s ban from U.S. app stores will be an “inconvenience” to the group. However, they were not able to prove that the ban will cause “immediate, irreparable harm” as

Read More
Read More

Judge Prepares Ruling After Hearing On Trump TikTok Download Ban

A federal judge listened to arguments in a rare Sunday hearing ahead of making a crucial decision on whether to allow or block a Trump administration ban on downloads of the popular video-sharing app TikTok.

District Judge Carl Nichols, who has promised to rule on a TikTok request to block the president’s order before it takes effect at 11:59 pm Sunday (0359 GMT Monday), heard arguments on the free-speech and national security implications of the Trump ban on the Chinese-owned app.

TikTok lawyer John Hall said a ban would be “punitive” and close off a public forum used by tens of millions of Americans.

In a written brief ahead of the hearing, TikTok lawyers said the ban was “arbitrary and capricious” and “would undermine data security” by blocking updates and fixes to the app used by some 100 million Americans.

The company also said the ban was unnecessary because negotiations

Read More
Read More