World’s Biggest Polluters Are Hiding in Plain Sight

It’s only when your car breaks down that you realize you’ve been sold a lemon.

That’s a lesson often applied in financial markets. When capital is flowing freely, investors aren’t likely to spend too long kicking the tires before deciding to put money down. When funding becomes more constrained, they’ll want to examine every detail of the log book before driving off.

This phenomenon was seen most dramatically in the period spanning the 1997–98 Asian financial crisis and the 2001 Enron bankruptcy. People who’d piled into investments suddenly discovered that accounting rules were shot through with loopholes and lacunas, allowing businesses with seemingly robust balance sheets to collapse overnight. That shock, and the desire to tempt back capital with the promise of more transparency, is one of the main reasons that international accounting and audit standards have been harmonized so rapidly in the decades since.

We’re overdue a similar reckoning

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Using machine learning to tackle some of the world’s biggest problems (Infographic)

Presented by AWS Machine Learning


It takes a combination of imagination, innovation, and machine learning to help create change in the world. The promise of machine learning for social good is being realized as the technology evolves to a point where organizations across industries and categories can leverage its unique power. Innovators are tapping into the best practices, in-depth expertise, and powerful solutions of companies like AWS to launch new initiatives and solutions that are improving lives and protecting our planet right now.

With machine learning, organizations are making inroads toward protecting biodiversity, supporting our veterans, finding homes for the homeless, understanding climate change, and more. But this is just the beginning.

Here’s a look at some of the world’s most powerful, promising applications of machine learning to benefit society.

For a more in-depth read, see this recent article on VentureBeat and see more ways machine learning is being used

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The Five Biggest Mistakes Startups Make In PR

Ronjini Joshua is the Founder and CEO of The Silver Telegram, a technology PR agency focused on brand leadership through media relations.

Public relations isn’t rocket science. This is something I’ve been promoting for most of my career. However, there are practices and experiences you pick up along the long path of this career that can’t be replaced with trial and error.

I see this mostly in the startup space, where companies have either done very little PR in the past or no PR and are expecting it to be a sprint effort versus a marathon. Public relations does very little for your brand if it is not executed well because there are three main characteristics of PR that factor into success:

1. Doing your research/homework;

2. Building credibility;

3. Understanding your audience.

Every brand should establish processes that touch these three keys to understand and build a

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Colorado regulators leaning toward enacting what could be the country’s biggest setbacks from oil, gas wells

A state commission has given preliminary approval to what could be the largest statewide setbacks for oil and gas wells in the country.

The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission voted Monday for 2,000-foot setbacks. A final vote on that rule and many others is expected in early November.

The COGCC said it believes the 2,000 feet of space that would be required between homes, schools and oil and gas wells would be the largest in the country.

However, the requirement comes with exceptions that could in practice result in shorter setbacks in certain cases, including when topography or technology can provide comparable protections at a shorter distance.

The setbacks and a first-of-its-kind emissions-monitoring rules for wells approved Sept. 23 by the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission are part of the implementation of Senate Bill 181. Both panels have been holding public hearings, meeting with interest groups and writing rules

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Shares in China’s biggest chipmaker fall after reports that it could lose access to US technology

Shares in SMIC, China’s biggest chipmaker, fell on Monday on fears that it could lose access to key US technology.



a group of people standing in front of a building: People visit the stand of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation (SMIC) during an exhibition in Shanghai, China, 14 March 2018. (Imaginechina via AP Images)


© Imaginechina via AP Images
People visit the stand of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation (SMIC) during an exhibition in Shanghai, China, 14 March 2018. (Imaginechina via AP Images)

The Financial Times reported this weekend that the US Commerce Department has sent a letter to companies warning of an “unacceptable risk” that exports to Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation could be used for military purposes.

It’s not entirely clear whether that letter means that official restrictions on SMIC have gone into effect. The FT reported that the firm had been “hit by US sanctions.” Reuters similarly reported that the US is tightening controls on exports to SMIC, citing the letter.

But the US Commerce Department has not yet added the Chinese firm to its Entity List, which would require US companies

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Trump Administration Whacks Biggest Chinese Chip Maker

Targeting China’s tech companies is now the norm.

Targeting China’s tech companies is now the norm.
Photo: Thomas Peter-Pool (Getty Images)

The Trump administration has another Chinese technology company on its radar: the Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation, the country’s biggest chip maker. And as you all can imagine if you’ve been following the recent news cycle, that is not good for SMIC.

On Friday, the U.S. Department of Commerce informed American companies in the chip industry of new restrictions on exports to SMIC, the Financial Times reported. Now, American companies must obtain licenses from the government in order to sell products, such as software and chip-making equipment, to SMIC.

In a letter communicating the new restrictions to U.S. companies, the Commerce Department said that it had taken action because exports to SMIC posed an “unacceptable risk” of potentially being used for military purposes.

According to U.S. government sources quoted by the Times, the

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US sets restrictions on China’s biggest chipmaker, citing military fears

US wariness of Chinese tech firms was underlined again Friday, when the Commerce Department reportedly sent a letter to companies in the states telling them they must get a license before exporting certain goods to China’s largest chipmaker, because of concerns about military use of technology.



a traffic light hanging off the side of a building: The Beijing branch of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation. Su Weizhong/Getty Images


© Provided by CNET
The Beijing branch of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation. Su Weizhong/Getty Images

The Commerce Department said in the letter that exports to Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation “may pose an unacceptable risk of diversion to a military end use in the People’s Republic of China,” according to a report Saturday by The New York Times.

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Last year, the US placed restrictions on companies selling gear to Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei, over concerns about Huawei’s relationship with the Chinese government and fears that its equipment could be used to spy on other countries and companies.

And popular video app TikTok, owned

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COVID-19 forces one of the biggest surges in technology investment in history, finds Harvey Nash/KPMG survey


COVID-19 forces one of the biggest surges in technology investment in history, finds Harvey Nash/KPMG survey




HONG KONG, Sept. 25, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Companies spent the equivalent of around US$15bn[1] extra a week on technology to enable safe and secure home working during COVID-19, reveals the global 2020 Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey. This was one of the biggest surges in technology investment in history – with the world’s IT leaders spending more than their annual budget rise[2] in just three months, as the global crisis hit, and lockdowns began to be enforced.


The largest technology leadership survey in the world of over 4,200 IT leaders, including over 100 leaders from mainland China and Hong Kong, analysed responses from organizations with a combined technology spend of over US$250bn. Surveyed CIOs in mainland China and Hong Kong

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Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Novavax, Costco & more

Here are the companies making headlines in extending trading.



a statue of a person riding a horse: A child wearing a face mask sits on the Charging Bull statue, also known as the Wall Street Bull, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in New York, August 19, 2020.


© Provided by CNBC
A child wearing a face mask sits on the Charging Bull statue, also known as the Wall Street Bull, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in New York, August 19, 2020.

Novavax — Shares of the biotech company rose more than 4% after Novavax announced that it had started a phase three trial in the United Kingdom for its coronavirus vaccine candidate. Novavax said the trial would involve up to 10,000 patients over the next four to six weeks.

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Costco — Shares of the retailer fell 2.6% after reporting its results for its fiscal fourth quarter. The company reported $53.38 billion of revenue, $1.3 billion above what analysts were expecting, according to Refinitv. Costco also beat earnings estimates, reporting adjusted earnings per share of $3.04 versus $2.84 expected. The company said it had

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Amazon just unveiled the biggest redesign to the Echo since its launch in 2014



a close up of a bowl: The redesigned Amazon Echo. Amazon


© Amazon
The redesigned Amazon Echo. Amazon

  • Amazon just unveiled the biggest redesign to its Echo devices since 2014. 
  • The new Echo and Echo Dot, Amazon’s popular Alexa-enabled smart speakers, will now come in a spherical shape rather than the tall, cylindrical design of previous Echos. 
  • The new Echo devices will start shipping later this year and cost $100 and $50 respectively. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Amazon just unveiled a redesigned Echo and Echo Dot, the biggest change to the device’s look and feel since its debut in 2014. 

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The ecommerce giant on Thursday hosted its annual product event, where it typically shows of the next generation of its Echo and Alexa-enabled devices. Unlike years past, this year’s event took place entirely virtually, with Amazon showcasing its new technology over a live stream from its Spheres in Seattle. 

The new Echo devices mark a major

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