How to Revolutionize Biodiversity Conservation in the U.S.

The recently released 2020 Democratic Party platform contains a lot of policies that will excite scientists and environmentalists, including an aggressive agenda to fight climate change, the return of science-based decision making to the EPA, and environmental justice. There’s one game-changing passage, however, that’s received shockingly little notice outside of a small circle of experts—who are no less than ecstatic to see it mentioned at this level. Indeed, the inclusion of a statement like this in a national party platform and a presidential campaign promise represents the largest shift in United States science-based biodiversity conservation policy since the Endangered Species Act.

I’m speaking about “30 by 30,” the goal of using science-based decision-making to protect 30 percent of U.S. lands and waters by the year 2030. “Vice President Biden is committed to making the country more resilient to climate change and securing environmental justice, so I suggested that including the

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Biodiversity: Why the nature crisis matters, in five graphics

Butterfly exhibition, LondonImage copyright
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Human activities are destroying the natural world, leading to the extinction of animal and plant species at an alarming rate. Now, world leaders are promising action to tackle the problem. But will it be enough?

What is biodiversity and why does it matter?

Biodiversity is the variety of all living things on Earth, and how they fit together in the web of life, bringing oxygen, water, food and countless other benefits.

Recent reports and studies have produced alarming news about the state of nature.

Last year, an intergovernmental panel of scientists said one million animal and plant species were now threatened with extinction.

And this month, a report found global populations of mammals, birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles plunged by 68%, on average, between 1970 and 2016.

Are we living in an age of extinction?

Scientists have warned that we are entering the sixth mass extinction,

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Businesses Could Pay $1 Trillion Biodiversity Bill

As the United Nations Summit on Biodiversity meets on Wednesday, governments and businesses are being urged to commit to ambitious new targets.

“We have failed to meet any of the biodiversity targets we set in Japan 10 years ago,” UN Secretary General António Guterres told the virtual Leaders’ Pledge for Nature on Monday. “We need a new biodiversity framework.”

The new framework the UN Convention on Biological Diversity has in mind is to place 30% of the Earth’s surface under conservation status by 2030. This would almost double the amount of land and sea currently under protection.

On Monday, prime ministers of the U.K. and Canada, Boris Johnson and Justin Trudeau, said their countries would commit to protecting 30% of their land and sea by 2030.

Others are expected to follow suit on Wednesday (30 September) as leaders meet virtually for the United Nations Summit on

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Marine biodiversity reshuffles under warmer and sea ice-free Pacific Arctic — ScienceDaily

Climate warming will alter marine community compositions as species are expected to shift poleward, significantly impacting the Arctic marine ecosystem.

The biodiversity of marine communities in the Pacific Arctic under future climate change scenarios highlights profound changes relative to their present patterns. Alterations in marine species distributions in response to warming and sea ice reduction are likely to increase the susceptibility and vulnerability of Arctic ecosystems. The findings, published by Hokkaido University researchers in the journal Science of the Total Environment, also suggest that there will be potential impacts on the ecosystem function and services.

Fisheries oceanographer Irene Alabia of Hokkaido University’s Arctic Research Center along with colleagues in Japan and the US investigated how future climate changes will impact the marine biodiversity in the Bering and Chukchi Seas. These seas extend from Alaska to Russia in the northern Pacific and southern Arctic oceans.

“This area forms a ‘biogeographical

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Britain, Canada, EU throw weight behind 2030 biodiversity protection goal

BRUSSELS/LONDON (Reuters) – Britain and Canada on Monday joined the European Union in pledging to protect 30% of their land and seas by 2030 to stem “catastrophic” biodiversity loss and help galvanise support for broader agreement on the target ahead of a U.N. summit.

FILE PHOTO: A bald eagle is pictured perched in a tree in Baddeck, Nova Scotia, Canada, August 15, 2019. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri/File Photo

With the twin crises of climate change and wildlife loss accelerating, leaders are trying to build momentum ahead of the meeting in Kunming, China, in May, where nearly 200 countries will negotiate a new agreement on protecting nature.

“We must act now – right now. We cannot afford dither and delay because biodiversity loss is happening today and it is happening at a frightening rate. Left unchecked, the consequences will be catastrophic for us all,” British Prime Minister Boris

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Britain, Canada, EU Throw Weight Behind 2030 Biodiversity Protection Goal | World News

By Kate Abnett and Simon Jessop

BRUSSELS/LONDON (Reuters) – Britain and Canada on Monday joined the European Union in pledging to protect 30% of their land and seas by 2030 to stem “catastrophic” biodiversity loss and help galvanise support for broader agreement on the target ahead of a U.N. summit.

With the twin crises of climate change and wildlife loss accelerating, leaders are trying to build momentum ahead of the meeting in Kunming, China, in May, where nearly 200 countries will negotiate a new agreement on protecting nature.

“We must act now – right now. We cannot afford dither and delay because biodiversity loss is happening today and it is happening at a frightening rate. Left unchecked, the consequences will be catastrophic for us all,” British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said.

“Extinction is forever – so our action must be immediate.”

Without action, 30% to 50% of all species could

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