Record-Breaking Bird Just Flew Nonstop From Alaska to New Zealand

A bar-tailed godwit in Australia.

A bar-tailed godwit in Australia.
Image: JJ Harrison/Wikimedia

A conservation group has tracked a migration for the ages, in which a male bar-tailed godwit flew from Alaska to New Zealand without taking a single break.

As the Guardian reports, the bar-tailed godwit departed southwestern Alaska on September 16 and arrived 11 days later at a bay near Auckland, New Zealand. The bird, designated 4BBRW (for the blue, blue, red, and white identification rings attached to its legs), was tracked by Global Flyway Network, a conservation group that studies long-distance migrating shorebirds.

Bar-tailed godwits (Limosa lapponica) are exceptional birds, featuring some mind-bogglingly long migratory routes. The wading birds spend their summers in the arctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere (where they breed) and then fly south for the winter, in some cases as far as Australia and New Zealand. Bar-tailed godwits are fast and lightweight, with

Read More
Read More

This Extraordinary Bird Is Both Male and Female, Divided Down the Middle

From Men’s Health

  • Scientists have discovered a gynandromorphic (two-sexed) bird in a Pennsylvania nature reserve.
  • The bird displays an even split down the middle between male and female feather coloring, leaving researchers to label it a “unicorn.”
  • The bird is likely a product of a genetic anomaly, but it’s perfectly healthy.

Every once in a while, a genetic anomaly will occur in the animal world that blows scientists’ minds. Take, for example, the exotic bird in the image above. It’s “gynandromorphic,” which means a specimen containing both female and male characteristics that can sometimes be seen in physical traits on the body.

Meet the rose-breasted grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus), which displays an even split down the middle between male and female feather coloring. The bird’s right side shows red plumage (male), while and its left shows golden yellow feathers (female), according to scientists from the Carnegie Museum of Natural

Read More
Read More

This Bird Is Both Male and Female

gynandromorphic rose breasted grosbeak

Carnegie Museum of Natural History / Annie Lindsay

  • Scientists have discovered a gynandromorphic (two-sexed) bird in a Pennsylvania nature reserve.
  • The bird displays an even split down the middle between male and female feather coloring, leaving researchers to label it a “unicorn.”
  • The bird is likely a product of a genetic anomaly, but it’s perfectly healthy.

    Every once in a while, a genetic anomaly will occur in the animal world that blows scientists’ minds. Take, for example, the exotic bird in the image above. It’s “gynandromorphic,” which means a specimen containing both female and male characteristics that can sometimes be seen in physical traits on the body.

    🦅 You love badass animals. So do we. Let’s nerd out over them together.

    Meet the rose-breasted grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus), which displays an even split down the middle between male and female feather coloring. The bird’s right side shows red plumage

    Read More
    Read More

    First People In Bahamas Caused Bird Extinctions, Displacement

    KEY POINTS

    • Several bird species in the Bahamian islands were lost or displaced after humans arrived
    • Researchers say the human impact is the “most likely culprit” for the losses
    • The others that survived are said to be more resilient but they still need to be protected

    Did the early humans really have a more harmonious relationship with the environment? A new study found that human arrival in the Bahamian islands actually led to the loss and displacement of several bird species.

    Humanity today is facing an extinction crisis, which many believe is caused by human actions quite unlike the previous mass extinctions that were caused by natural events. These actions include overfishing, deforestation, pollution and the burning of fossil fuels.

    Does this necessarily mean those earlier humans without the tools for massive deforestation and harnessing fossil fuels were more harmonized with the environment? According to a new study, maybe

    Read More
    Read More

    This rare bird is male on one side and female on the other

    In Rector, Pa., researchers have spotted one strange bird.

    This rose-breasted grosbeak has a pink breast spot and a pink “wing pit” and black feathers on its right wing — telltale shades of males. On its left side, the songbird displays yellow and brown plumage, hues typical of females.

    Annie Lindsay had been out capturing and banding birds with identification tags with her colleagues at Powdermill Nature Reserve in Rector on September 24 when a teammate hailed her on her walkie-talkie to alert her of the bird’s discovery. Lindsay, who is banding program manager at Powdermill, immediately knew what she was looking at: a half-male, half-female creature known as a gynandromorph.

    “It was spectacular. This bird is in its nonbreeding [plumage], so in the spring when it’s in its breeding plumage, it’s going to be even more starkly male, female,” Lindsay says. The bird’s colors will become even more vibrant,

    Read More
    Read More