IBM, Seeing Its Future in the Cloud, Breaks Off I.T. Unit

IBM, throughout its 109-year history, hasn’t often led technology trends. But it has adapted and eventually prospered time and again.

It is trying to go the adaptation route once again.

IBM on Thursday acknowledged the challenge and embraced the opportunity for the company in the accelerating shift to cloud computing. The company said it was spinning off its legacy technology services business to focus on cloud computing and artificial intelligence.

Arvind Krishna, who became chief executive this year, called the move “a landmark day” for IBM, “redefining the company.”

The split-up strategy reflects how decisively computing has shifted to the cloud. Today, nearly all new software is being created as a cloud service, delivered over the internet from remote data centers. The computing model affords corporate customers more flexibility and cost savings, sold as a pay-for-use service or annual subscriptions.

IBM was late to the cloud market, which was pioneered

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New technique breaks through a technology roadblock that limited RNA imaging for 50 years — ScienceDaily

University of Maryland scientists have developed a method to determine the structures of large RNA molecules at high resolution. The method overcomes a challenge that has limited 3D analysis and imaging of RNA to only small molecules and pieces of RNA for the past 50 years.

The new method, which expands the scope of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, will enable researchers to understand the shape and structure of RNA molecules and learn how they interact with other molecules. The insights provided by this technology could lead to targeted RNA therapeutic treatments for disease. The research paper on this work was published in the journal Science Advances on October 7, 2020.

“The field of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been stuck looking at things that are small, say 35 RNA building blocks or nucleotides. But most of the interesting things that are biologically and medically relevant are much bigger, 100

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WFH tips from Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella: Regular breaks, short meetings, and other advice

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. (GeekWire Photo / Kevin Lisota)

Schedule super quick meetings just to check in with colleagues. Read more. And try to fit “moments of transition” into your daily schedule.

Those are some tips from Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella to help manage well-being with the new WFH lifestyle.

Nadella spoke this week at the Wall Street Journal’s CEO Council. He said he’s focused on three major considerations of how the nature is work is changing amid the pandemic: how collaboration happens, how learning happens inside companies, and how to ensure employees aren’t burning out.

The last point has become even more important over the past several months as workers conduct multiple meetings per day via video and don’t have the same interactions with colleagues at a physical office. Microsoft studies show that people are now working after hours and on weekends more frequently, and that remote work is

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SpaceX launches 60 more Starlink satellites, breaks ‘Scrubtober’ delay streak

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A Falcon 9 blasts off on Aug. 30.


SpaceX

Space fans have been starved for action lately, with three big missions repeatedly scrubbed and postponed over the past several weeks. But early on Tuesday, SpaceX finally ended the streak that became known as #Scrubtober (the hashtag previously known as #Scrubtember) with the launch and deployment of 60 new Starlink satellites via a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral. 

This Starlink mission was the Falcon 9 rocket booster’s third flight overall. It sent astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to orbit in May and then launched a South Korean satellite in July. So far, SpaceX has managed to launch and land the same rocket up to six times

The Falcon 9 first stage landed again on the droneship Of Course I Still Love You in the Atlantic about 8.5 minutes after launch Tuesday. SpaceX also reports that it caught at

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To Protect Good Jobs, End Tax Breaks for Job-Killing Technology

Ever wonder why companies spend so much money on machinery and software that kills jobs? One reason is that the U.S. tax code practically forces their hands. The tax on capital has fallen to around 5% in recent years while the tax on labor has remained around 25%, according to a new white paper (PDF) for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Task Force on the Work of the Future.

“Favorable taxation of capital leads to excessive automation,” MIT economist Daron Acemoglu, the lead author of the paper, said in an Oct. 1 interview. Acemoglu testified about excessive automation before the House Budget Committee on Sept. 10 (PDF) and expanded on the tax aspects in the new paper.

The standard economic argument in favor of lightly taxing capital (equipment, software, buildings) is that the supply of capital is highly sensitive to tax rates. High taxes will discourage investment in

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Syracuse breaks out of rut, defeats Georgia Tech 37-20

“He really did his job,” Syracuse coach Dino Babers said. “He really went after it. We like guys who are hit at the 20 but not tackled until the 25 or 26.”

Jeff Sims completed 13 of 28 passes for 174 yards and one touchdown for the Yellow Jackets but had four interceptions at the hands of the opportunistic defense.

“Big focus all week was on not turning the ball over. Obviously, we didn’t do that,” said Georgia Tech coach Geoff Collins. “Finishing in the red zone, finishing drives, obviously didn’t do that. That’s on me. I’ve go to do a better job getting guys ready. We have to protect the football.”

Jahmyr Gibbs, a freshman playing in just his second game for Tech, had 105 yards, the first 100-yard game of his brief career. Dontae Smith had a career-high 75 yards rushing.

Syracuse had scored 16 points, one touchdown

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