Judge set to rule in TikTok case as deadline looms

A federal judge readied a crucial decision Sunday on whether to allow or block a Trump administration ban on downloads of the popular video-sharing app TikTok.

US District Judge Carl Nichols, who has promised to rule on a TikTok request to block the president’s order before it takes effect at 11:59 pm Sunday (0359 GMT Monday), heard arguments on the free-speech and national security implications of the Trump ban on the Chinese-owned app in a rare Sunday telephone hearing.

TikTok lawyer John Hall said a ban would be “punitive” and close off a public forum used by tens of millions of Americans.

In a written brief filed ahead of the hearing, TikTok lawyers said the ban was “arbitrary and capricious” and “would undermine data security” by blocking updates and fixes to the app used by some 100 million Americans.

The company also said the ban was unnecessary because negotiations were

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Justice Department case against Google is said to focus on search dominance

WASHINGTON — The Department of Justice’s (DOJ) impending lawsuit against Google has narrowed to focus on the company’s power over internet search, a decision that could set off a cascade of separate lawsuits from states in ensuing weeks over the Silicon Valley giant’s dominance in other business segments.

In presentations to state attorneys general starting on Wednesday, the DOJ is expected to outline its legal case centered on how Google uses its dominant search engine to harm rivals and consumers, said four people with knowledge of the plan, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the details were confidential. Meeting with the state attorneys general is one of the final steps before the DOJ files its suit against the company, they said.

The DOJ’s action against Google is set to be narrower than what had been envisioned by some states and several career lawyers in the department. The DOJ

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Boyd Matheson: Breonna Taylor’s case nods to a crucial conversation

People who are losing the capacity to feel reverence are in danger of losing a great deal more. As a society we have lost much when it comes to reverence over the last several decades, and especially over the past year. Reverence for life, reverence for others, reverence for principles of justice and equality, reverence for freedom — have all been eroded by erroneous, egocentric thinking and the cancer of contempt. When it comes to reverence we simply cannot afford to lose much more.

Author Jeff Woodward stated, “Without reverence, people do not know how to respect each other or how to respect themselves. Without reverence an army cannot tell the difference between what it is and a gang of bandits. In our technology driven society, reverence has fallen beneath the horizons of our intellectual vision.”

The tragic shooting death of Breonna Taylor by law enforcement officers in Louisville, Kentucky,

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Former eBay Workers to Plead Guilty in Harassment Case

Four former employees of eBay are expected to plead guilty for their role in a bizarre harassment campaign in 2019 in which they allegedly sent live spiders, cockroaches, a funeral wreath, and a bloody pig-head Halloween mask to a Boston couple who criticized the online marketplace.

The victims drew attention from the alleged perpetrators after they chastised eBay in an online newsletter that focused on e-commerce companies.

The four defendants, all former members of eBay’s global security team, are Brian Gilbert, 51; Stephanie Popp, 32; Stephanie Stockwell, 26; and Veronica Zea, 26; all from California. The charges include conspiracy to commit cyberstalking and conspiracy to tamper with a witness, with such crimes carrying a sentence of up to five years in prison, three years of supervised release, a fine of up to $250,000, and restitution.

The cases against three others — David Harville, 48, eBay’s former director of global resiliency;

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DOJ’s Google antitrust case focused on search dominance: report

  • The Department of Justice is narrowing the focus of its antitrust case against Google to the company’s dominance of internet searches, The New York Times reported Tuesday. 
  • The decision to focus only on search reflected political disagreements, with some attorney generals now considering additional lawsuits focused on anticompetitive behavior by Google, according to the report.
  • Attorney General William Barr has pushed to sue Google before the election, overruling DOJ attorneys who said they needed more time to build their case, The New York Times previously reported.
  • Tensions around the DOJ’s case come as Trump reportedly prepares to urge Republican attorneys general to investigate his allegations that social media companies are biased against conservatives.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The US Department of Justice is dialing back the antitrust lawsuit it’s preparing to file against Google, and will focus primarily on anticompetitive behavior related to internet searches, the The

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