Creating Resilience In Oil And Gas Supply Chains With Technology

The Covid-19 pandemic has everyone rethinking what steps to take for resilience today, and how to safeguard that resilience for an uncertain energy future. Nearly every oil and gas executive said, in the just released EY Oil and Gas Digital Transformation and the Workforce Survey, that their company will have to change how it operates coming out of the downturn. What’s implied by that result is that oil and gas executives don’t expect the market to ever go back to where it was.

They are right. Oil demand is unlikely to return to the path it was on before the pandemic. New ways of living, working and operating our day-to-day lives have taken hold and are likely to permanently transform traditional choices. When we get to

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Drive-thru times at fast-food chains slow by nearly 30 seconds as demand soars

As consumers increasingly pick up their fast-food orders from the comfort of their car, average drive-thru times across 10 chains slowed down by nearly half a minute, according to an annual study conducted by SeeLevel HX.

Drive-thru lanes have always been an important feature for fast-food restaurants, but the coronavirus pandemic has heavily shifted consumer preferences in favor of the easy pick-up option, which also appears more safe to consumers. Drive-thru visits increased by 26% in April, May and June, according to data from the NPD Group. Taco Bell said that it served an additional 4.8 million cars through its drive-thru lanes during its second quarter.

The abrupt change in consumer behavior has motivated restaurant chains like Starbucks and Chipotle Mexican Grill to add more drive-thru lanes to their restaurants.

Total average drive-thru times slowed down by 29.8 seconds this year, weighed down by longer wait times, according to SeeLevel

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The tech crisis that isn’t: China controls the world’s rare earth supply chains

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Photo of a Japanese Coast Guard vessel patrolling Uotsuri Island by Al Jazeera English, licensed under Creative Commons 2.0.

They’re called either the Diaoyu Archipelago or the Senkaku Islands — eight rocks just a few miles wide, if that, situated about 125 miles southwest of Okinawa. They’re uninhabited, and generally so strategically unimportant that during negotiations for the Treaty of San Francisco in 1951 that established Japan’s territorial borders, diplomats forgot to mention them. They remained “occupied” by the US until 1972. Today, Japan claims them, but so does China and so does Taiwan. From a distance, they look like the tops of old furniture floating just above the waterline after a flood.

Submerged reefs make for wonderful fishing. During the first week of September 2010, several unlicensed Chinese trawlers were spotted operating in what Japan calls the Senkaku. Depending on who tells the story, there may have been as

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