Mario Molina, Nobel-winning Mexican chemist who made key climate change finding, dies at 77

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mario Molina, winner of the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1995 and the only Mexican scientist to be honored with a Nobel, died Wednesday in his native Mexico City. He was 77 years old.

Molina’s family announced his death in a brief statement through the institute that carried his name. It did not give a cause of death.

He won the prize along with scientists Frank Sherwood Rowland of the United States and Paul Crutzen of the Netherlands for their research into climate change.

Molina and Rowland published a paper in 1974 that saw the thinning of the ozone layer as a consequence of chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, chemicals used in a range of products.

Molina’s work contributed to the drafting of the first international treaty on the subject, the Montreal Protocol, which phased out the use of the chemicals. Later, he focused on confronting air pollution

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How to tell if you should change jobs

Should you change jobs, perhaps even careers? Few questions are more prevalent among ambitious professionals (with the possible exception of whether it’s time to change a romantic partner). Yet both questions are best answered by the old Facebook status update: “It’s complicated.”

When the job market is strong and opportunities are plentiful, it’s tempting to assume that the grass is greener elsewhere. But with the COVID-19 crisis battering job markets around the world, it may seem less logical for those fortunate enough to have a job to fantasize about alternatives. However, even in the current uncertain, fragile, and weaker economic environment, staying put is not necessarily the best possible strategy.

There is no bulletproof formula for making the right career move. The only way to determine if your move is right is to actually make it and see (the proof in the pudding). This was true before the pandemic, but

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To fight climate change, should we mine the deep sea? USF wants to find out.

Ancient rocks lie across vast fields miles below the surface of the Pacific Ocean.

Far from people, but not entirely out of reach, they contain metals such as cobalt, used in batteries for technology like electric cars. They are numerous, about the size of meatballs or potatoes, and formed over millions of years.

These stones may hold a key to fighting climate change, according to a contingent of entrepreneurs who want to mine them. To wean the world off fossil fuels that worsen global warming, scientists say, will require a lot of batteries. That’s where the rocks could help.

But nothing is so simple in the abyss.

Opponents argue that rushing into deep-sea mining risks destroying a pristine wilderness, killing species that have lived free of human intrusion for millennia. They say miners would disrupt a habitat that might hold other value for society, potentially home to microbes that fight

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Mouse study suggests parental response to infant distress is innate but adapts to change — ScienceDaily

A National Institutes of Health study in mice suggests that parents have an innate capacity to respond to an infant’s cries for help and this capacity may serve as a foundation from which a parent learns to adjust to an infant’s changing needs. The study was conducted by Robert C. Froemke, Ph.D., of New York University School of Medicine, and colleagues. It appears in Nature.

When housed with mice who have given birth, unmated female mice will assist with the care of the newborn pups. The researchers evaluated the ability of such babysitter mice to respond to a variety of recorded newborn distress cries. These included typical distress cries as well as a range of cries that had been digitally altered — sped up or slowed down to include more or fewer syllables than typical distress vocalizations.

Experienced babysitters responded to typical distress cries 80% of the time, compared

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Nano-scientists develop a molecular tool to change the structure of a metal surface — ScienceDaily

The surface of metals plays a key role in many technologically relevant areas, such as catalysis, sensor technology and battery research. For example, the large-scale production of many chemical compounds takes place on metal surfaces, whose atomic structure determines if and how molecules react with one another. At the same time, the surface structure of a metal influences its electronic properties. This is particularly important for the efficiency of electronic components in batteries. Researchers worldwide are therefore working intensively on developing new kinds of methods to tailor the structure of metal surfaces at the atomic level.

A team of researchers at the University of Münster, consisting of physicists and chemists and led by Dr. Saeed Amirjalayer, has now developed a molecular tool which makes it possible, at the atomic level, to change the structure of a metal surface. Using computer simulations, it was possible to predict that the restructuring of

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Nutanix and HCL change the definition of infrastructure operations

The introduction of database as a service is a big deal for companies experiencing delays on the digital transformation journey, especially now that the pressures of COVID-19 are forcing fast adoption and adaption.

“In the short term, there’s hardly any industry which is not touched by COVID,” said Taj Singh (pictured, right), senior vice president of information technology services company HCL Technologies Ltd. “In the long-term, we strongly believe that the customers will be in a hybrid/multicloud world.”

Nutanix Inc. is one company responding to the growing demand for DBaaS and upgrading multi-cluster management. The company announced today its general availability for Era 2.0.

Singh along with Thenu Kittappa (pictured, left), director of strategic initiatives and business strategy at Nutanix, and Anand Akela (pictured, center), product marketing leader at Nutanix, joined Stu Miniman, host of theCUBE, SiliconANGLE Media’s livestreaming studio, during the Nutanix: Introducing a New Era in Database

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Coastal Change Happens! USGS Has Data and Tools to Help Coastal Communities Prepare

The U.S. Geological Survey has launched a new Coastal Change Hazards website focused on coordinating research and delivering tools needed by coastal communities to respond to natural hazards along our Nation’s coastlines.

As Hurricane Sally approached the US Gulf Coast, the USGS Coastal Change Hazards team produced a series of forecasts for impacts on the beach. Forecasts were updated daily based on wave and storm surge forecasts from NOAA.

(Public domain.)

Our Nation’s coasts vary greatly, from relaxing sandy beaches and barrier islands, ecologically productive marshes, magnificent rocky coasts and cliffs, to tropical islands fringed by coral reefs and permafrost coasts where ice holds the sediments together. Each coastline is unique and faces different elements of coastal change.

Equally importantly, with more than 40% of the United States population inhabiting coastal counties, we must use the best available information and tools to reduce societal risk, protect natural resources, develop and

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‘Genshin Impact’ Feels Destined To Change The Gaming Industry

At this point, it feels like a long time ago that Genshin Impact first made its debut in the western gaming consciousness. It…did not go well. The game was widely derided as a knock-off of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, with a similar art style, the ability to climb anything in the world limited only by a stamina meter, music that evoked the Legend of Zelda series, and other systems like cooking and fire propagation. Now that the game has arrived, however, the conversation has turned on a dime. Genshin Impact is a fine, well-crafted game, and the world is taking immediate notice.

Despite competing with the US for the title of largest gaming market in the world, Chinese-developed games are viewed with suspicion in the west, and there aren’t a ton of crossover hits. The initial reaction to Genshin Impact shows

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Adam Ferrari Describes How Technology Will Change the Energy Sector

Startup Fortune, El Segundo, CA: Founder of Ferrari Energy, Adam Ferrari, shares some of the fascinating ways technology will help the energy sector adapt for future generations.

Technology has transformed the way many businesses operate. The energy sector is no exception, with various new technologies making their mark on the industry.

One of the benefits of emerging technology is that it can help facilitate more efficient business practices. As a result, many companies in the energy sector are shifting their business models to integrate digital technology.

As more people become interested in adopting alternative energy sources such as solar and wind, energy companies are now being challenged to identify ways to predict trends for future energy production. This is already happening across many companies, with an increasing interest in improving technology that can predict weather patterns and catalog analytics to better understand energy usage requirements across various regions in

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Emerging technologies can change the African financial landscape

Africa is the home to 1.2 billion people and what has been described as the world’s largest trade area — the African Continental Free Trade Area. Africa is forging a new path to driving development, and access to financial services will play a significant role in its economic growth. The need to provide improved systems for poverty reduction, if not alleviation, is further accentuated when one considers that 416 million Africans live in extreme poverty, and access to financial services is right at the heart of the solution.

In a review of the impact of financial inclusion on economic growth, the World Bank argues that “such services must be provided responsibly and safely to the consumer, and sustainably to the provider.” Construed appropriately, financial inclusion has the potential to reduce poverty and inequality by helping disadvantaged groups to benefit from opportunities that otherwise would not have been available.

Related: Financial

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