Study is first to assess the impact of climate change on the global population of river deltas — ScienceDaily

Thirty-one million people living in river deltas are at high risk of experiencing flooding and other impacts from tropical cyclones and climate change, according to a study by Indiana University researchers.

“To date, no one has successfully quantified the global population on river deltas and assessed the cumulative impacts from climate change,” said Douglas Edmonds, the Malcolm and Sylvia Boyce Chair in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and lead author on the study. “Since river deltas have long been recognized as hotspots of population growth, and with increasing impacts from climate change, we realized we needed to properly quantify what the cumulative risks are in river deltas.”

The findings are the result of a collaboration facilitated by IU’s Institute for Advanced Study with support from the Environmental Resilience Institute.

The team’s analysis shows that river deltas occupy 0.5 percent of the earth’s land surface, yet they contain 4.5

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Climate change responsible for record sea temperature levels — ScienceDaily

Global warming is driving an unprecedented rise in sea temperatures including in the Mediterranean, according to a major new report published by the peer-reviewed Journal of Operational Oceanography.

Data from the European Union’s (EU) Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) will increase concerns about the threat to the world’s seas and oceans from climate change.

The Ocean State Report reveals an overall trend globally of surface warming based on evidence from 1993 to 2018, with the largest rise in the Arctic Ocean.

European seas experienced record high temperatures in 2018, a phenomenon which the researchers attribute to extreme weather conditions — a marine heat wave lasting several months.

In the same year, a large mass of warm water occurred in the northeast Pacific Ocean, according to the report. This was similar to a marine heatwave — dubbed ‘the Blob’ — which was first detected in 2013 and had devastating

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Twitter plans to change how image cropping works following concerns over racial bias

Twitter this week announced it would be changing how image cropping works on its website after concerns that the machine learning-based algorithm the company was using was racially biased in how it cropped images, in particular by favoring white faces over Black ones.





© Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge


In a post diving into the issue, Parag Agrawal, the company’s chief technology officer, and design chief Dantley Davis explained how the company tested the model for racial or gender bias before it implemented the system. But Twitter didn’t publish how it had done those tests at the time so that external analysis could be performed, in what the company calls “an oversight.”

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“What you see is what you get”

To fix that, Twitter is “currently conducting additional analysis to add further rigor to our testing, are committed to sharing our findings, and are exploring ways

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Someday, even wet forests could burn due to climate change — ScienceDaily

Millions of years ago, fire swept across the planet, fueled by an oxygen-rich atmosphere in which even wet forests burned, according to new research by University of Colorado Boulder scientists.

The study, published today in Nature Geoscience, provides geochemical evidence showing that forest fires expanded dramatically, potentially burning up to 30 or 40 percent of global forests during a 100,000 year interval more than 90 million years ago. While today’s fires are exacerbated by dry conditions, they found that forest fires during this period increased even in wet regions due to changes in global climate.

“Studying this period in Earth’s history can shine light on how the modern and future Earth might behave under global change,” said F. Garrett Boudinot, lead author and recent PhD graduate in the Department of Geological Sciences.

Boudinot analyzed samples from a rock core that spans what is known as the Oceanic Anoxic Event

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Amazon Just Launched Technology That Could Change Everything From Buying Groceries to Boarding Airplanes



a close up of a persons hand: Amazon Just Launched Technology That Could Change Everything From Buying Groceries to Boarding Airplanes


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Amazon Just Launched Technology That Could Change Everything From Buying Groceries to Boarding Airplanes

Amazon One means you may not need a credit card or even a smartphone to pay for what you buy.

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New Amazon technology, introduced at two Amazon Go stores this week, lets shoppers pay for purchases by holding their hands over a scanner. The system, called Amazon One, may herald a new way of identifying yourself and paying for things that could change the way people shop, enter concerts, use public transportation, and many other things.

You’ve probably used a fingerprint scanner or facial recognition to unlock your smartphone. You already know that your voice and your retinas can be used to positively identify you and give you access to your various devices, and possibly to secure government

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Google abandoning a new Dublin office signals change

Google signage.

NurPhoto | Getty Images

When Google announced last month it was pulling the plug on a lease for a new office space in Dublin, Ireland, it set off alarm bells.

Google is a large presence in Dublin’s “Silicon Docks,” where it holds its European headquarters, a part of the city around the docklands area where a who’s who of Big Tech are located, including Facebook, Twitter and Airbnb.

But during the coronavirus pandemic and with the need for remote working, questions are being raised about the viability of large office spaces. Google said it remains committed to Dublin — where it has over 8,000 workers — and has purchased two more buildings that it still plans to fill.

The commercial property market in Dublin slumped in the second quarter as the country was in the depths of lockdown, according to real estate firm CBRE, which reported just 15

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Researchers will develop green technology to recycle refrigerants that drive climate change

LAWRENCE — Refrigerants inside the air conditioner that cools your house or apartment are extremely powerful greenhouse gases. Used widely in domestic and commercial cooling systems, commonplace refrigerants called hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) such as R-410A have a global-warming potential roughly 2,000 times greater than the carbon dioxide emitted from vehicle tailpipes.

Recent legislation restricts using some HFC refrigerants in particular applications and mandates their eventual phaseout, but with millions of tons of HFCs used today around the world, how can they be disposed of without harming the environment? Venting or incinerating them would be wasteful and could accelerate climate change.

Now, Project EARTH (Environmentally Applied Research Toward Hydrofluorocarbons), a new research project based at the University of Kansas School of Engineering, will develop technology to separate and recycle HFC refrigerant mixtures. Supported by a four-year, $2 million grant from the National Science Foundation, the Project EARTH collaboration comprises four universities —

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Color Star Technology Announces Change in Ticker Symbol

NEW YORK, Oct. 1, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Color Star Technology Co., Ltd. (formerly, Nasdaq CM: HHT) (the “Company”, or “Color Star”), a company engaged in the businesses of providing online and offline paid knowledge services for the media, entertainment and culture industries globally, today announced that the Company’s ordinary shares will commence trading on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the new ticker symbol “CSCW” (Nasdaq CM: CSCW), effective prior to the open of markets today. It represents the abbreviation of “Color Star Color World”. The changes reflect the Company’s on-going efforts to transform itself into a brand-centric paid knowledge services platform with focuses on the music and live entertainment industries.

“Following the success of our Color World Online Concert in September, our recently launched Color World App has reached over 500,000 registered users – not a small feat for our team. As we continue to add new artists to our

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Amazon’s New Hand Payment Technology Could Change In-Store Shopping Forever

New Amazon technology, introduced at two Amazon Go stores this week, lets shoppers pay for purchases by holding their hands over a scanner. The system, called Amazon One, may herald a new way of identifying yourself and paying for things that could change the way people shop, enter concerts, use public transportation, and many other things.

You’ve probably used a fingerprint scanner or facial recognition to unlock your smartphone. You already know that your voice and your retinas can be used to positively identify you and give you access to your various devices, and possibly to secure government or corporate facilities. Amazon’s new Amazon One technology takes biometrics a step further by allowing shoppers to pay for purchases with a simple scan of their palms.

To stave off privacy concerns, the company says it is encrypting biometric data before storing it in the cloud, and that the data will be

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The Debate Was a Disaster. But Hey, Climate Change Came Up

Near the end of last night’s catastrophic “presidential” debate, moderator Chris Wallace lobbed a surprising question at Donald Trump: “What do you believe about the science of climate change? And what will you do in the next four years to confront it?”

It was surprising because, for one thing, it wasn’t on the list of questions Wallace told the campaigns he’d be asking. For another, climate change typically rests out of view at the very bottom of the dumpster fire that is modern American politics. And more significantly, after an hour and a half of nearly constant interruptions and insults, mostly from Trump, what followed was a discussion that inched toward civility.

“It was kind of interesting that that was the most watchable part of the entire debate, I think,” says University of California, Los Angeles climate scientist Daniel Swain. “And that seems to be something that other people have

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