New 3-D model of a DNA-regulating complex in human cells provides cancer clues — ScienceDaily

Scientists have created an unprecedented 3-dimensional structural model of a key molecular “machine” known as the BAF complex, which modifies DNA architecture and is frequently mutated in cancer and some other diseases. The researchers, led by Cigall Kadoch, PhD, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, have reported the first 3-D structural “picture” of BAF complexes purified directly from human cells in their native states — rather than artificially synthesized in the laboratory -providing an opportunity to spatially map thousands of cancer-associated mutations to specific locations within the complex.

“A 3-D structural model, or ‘picture,’ of how this complex actually looks inside the nucleus of our cells has remained elusive — until now,” says Kadoch. The newly obtained model represents “the most complete picture of the human BAF complex achieved to date,” said the investigators, reporting in the journal Cell.

These new findings “provide a critical foundation for understanding human disease-associated mutations

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All the design clues, from colors to sizes

Analysts suggest Apple is on the cusp of launching its latest generation of superphone, with an event announced for Oct. 13 (you can livestream Apple’s event from home — here’s how to watch). The current hottest rumors suggest that we may see multiple versions of the iPhone 12, with features like 5G, lidar depth mapping and the latest A14 Bionic processor. (And here are some features on our iPhone 12 wish list that Apple should steal from Samsung.)  But what will the phone look like? Let’s dive into the rumor mill to work it out.



a screen shot of a computer: A concept mockup of the iPhone 12. Phone Arena


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A concept mockup of the iPhone 12. Phone Arena

Read more: Is iPhone 12 cheaper than iPhone 11? Here’s what we’ve heard about price

Every iPhone 12 feature we expect Apple to announce

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Multiple iPhone 12 sizes



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© Phone Arena


First up,

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What will iPhone 12 look like? All the design clues, from screen size to colors

AppleAnalysts suggestApple is on the cusp of launching its latest generation of superphone, with an event announced for October 13. The current hottest rumors suggest that we may see multiple version of the iPhone 12, with features like 5G, LiDar depth mapping and the latest A14 bionic processor. 

But what will the phone look like? Let’s dive into the rumor mill to work it out. 

Multiple iPhone 12 sizes

First up, the physical size of the phone. Analysts suggest that there will be four iterations of the phone, with the smallest being the new 5.4-inch iPhone 12 Mini. Then there’s the two base models, the iPhone 12 and 12 Pro, both expected to be 6.1-inches, making them slightly bigger than the current iPhone 11 Pro’s 5.8-inch size.

Finally, there’s

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New clues about the link between stress and depression — ScienceDaily

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a protein in the brain that is important both for the function of the mood-regulating substance serotonin and for the release of stress hormones, at least in mice. The findings, which are published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, may have implications for the development of new drugs for depression and anxiety.

After experiencing trauma or severe stress, some people develop an abnormal stress response or chronic stress. This increases the risk of developing other diseases such as depression and anxiety, but it remains unknown what mechanisms are behind it or how the stress response is regulated.

The research group at Karolinska Institutet has previously shown that a protein called p11 plays an important role in the function of serotonin, a neurotransmitter in the brain that regulates mood. Depressed patients and suicide victims have lower levels of the p11 protein in their

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Planet collision simulations give clues to atmospheric loss from Moon’s origin — ScienceDaily

Earth could have lost anywhere between ten and 60 per cent of its atmosphere in the collision that is thought to have formed the Moon.

New research led by Durham University, UK, shows how the extent of atmospheric loss depends upon the type of giant impact with the Earth.

Researchers ran more than 300 supercomputer simulations to study the consequences that different huge collisions have on rocky planets with thin atmospheres.

Their findings have led to the development of a new way to predict the atmospheric loss from any collision across a wide range of rocky planet impacts that could be used by scientists who are investigating the Moon’s origins or other giant impacts.

They also found that slow giant impacts between young planets and massive objects could add significant atmosphere to a planet if the impactor also has a lot of atmosphere.

The findings are published in the Astrophysical

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Are some black holes wormholes in disguise? Gamma-ray blasts may shed clues.

Unusual flashes of gamma rays could reveal that what appear to be giant black holes are actually huge wormholes, a new study finds.

Wormholes are tunnels in space-time that can theoretically allow travel anywhere in space and time, or even into another universe. Einstein’s theory of general relativity suggests wormholes are possible, although whether they really exist is another matter.

In many ways, wormholes resemble black holes. Both kinds of objects are extremely dense and possess extraordinarily strong gravitational pulls for bodies their size. The main difference is that no object can theoretically come back out after crossing a black hole’s event horizon — the threshold where the speed needed to escape the black hole’s gravitational pull exceeds the speed of light — whereas any body entering a wormhole could theoretically reverse course.

Video: Last 500 years around Milky Way’s supermassive black hole

Assuming wormholes might exist, researchers investigated ways

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