US Army prioritizes open architecture for future combat vehicle amid competition prep

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Army still plans to release of its request for proposals in December to replace the Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle, and it wants industry to prioritize an open architecture in its designs.

“The network is almost more important in some ways than building the combat vehicles,” Maj. Gen. Brian Cummings, program executive officer of ground combat systems, told Defense News in an interview ahead of the Association of the U.S. Army’s virtual conference.

The future optionally manned fighting vehicle will need the flexibility to be networked with other capabilities across the battlefield, and designed such that capabilities can plug into the vehicle at the forward edge. This realization was highlighted during the Army’s Project Convergence exercise at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, which wrapped up last month and during which an OMFV surrogate played a part.

The Army will focus on the effort to develop OMFV with an

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US Army firms up requirements for future long-Range assault aircraft ahead of competition

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Army’s Future Long-Range Assault Aircraft program passed through the Army Requirements Oversight Council’s gauntlet and received preliminary approval of its abbreviated capabilities development document, bringing the aircraft a step closer to a competitive procurement, according to the head of the service’s future vertical lift efforts.

The service is on a tight timeline to field a brand-new, long-range assault aircraft by 2030.

“The AROC went well,” Brig. Gen. Wally Rugen told Defense News in an Oct. 6 interview. “The aviation enterprise continues to impress me, just our ability to drive on these tough administrative and requirements tasks and get them done on time and do what we said we were going to do.”

At the time of the interview, not all of the paperwork was signed and the ink wasn’t dry. However, Rugen said, “it was probably one of the best AROCs I have attended in my

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Lawsuit alleges Apple blocks cloud gaming apps to stifle Apple Arcade competition

A new class action lawsuit alleges that Apple enjoys monopoly power in the iOS mobile gaming marketplace, and exhibits anticompetitive behavior to keep it that way.

The complaint, lodged in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, claims that Apple has “unlawfully [foreclosed] competition” through “persistent, pervasive, and secretive” misconduct.

New Jersey man John Pistacchio, the plaintiff in the case, claims to be paying “supracompetitive prices” for Apple Arcade as a result of the company’s alleged anticompetitive behavior.

More specifically, the lawsuit suggests that Apple exerts monopoly power over the iOS App Store by requiring developers to follow its app guidelines and by prohibiting third-party app stores. It adds that developers and app publishers are “powerless to constrain” Apple’s conduct by refusing to publish apps on iOS.

“No developer or group of developers have sufficient power to entice enough iOs users to leave iOS, such that

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TV Affiliates to DOJ: Broadcast Competition Standards ‘Out-of-Date’

WASHINGTON—ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC television affiliates have joined forces in an attempt to convince the Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division that the competition standards for broadcast television are out-of-date and are in need of an update to properly evaluate the impact of satellite, cable and digital competition.

In a joint letter to Assistant Attorney General Makan Delrahim, the affiliates claim that the Antitrust Division has only local broadcast stations competing against each other in their local markets and excludes satellite, cable and digital when it comes to viewership and advertising data. This viewpoint no longer matches the current market reality, the affiliates argue, but it is continuously the determining factor in the division’s review of broadcast transactions, “stifling broadcasters’ ability to achieve efficiencies to allow them to provide high-quality entertainment programming and locally-focused news, weather and sports.”

When it comes to local advertising, the affiliates argue that the

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