Africa Wildlife Tracking Leverages ORBCOMM’s Satellite IoT Technology to Support Conservation Efforts Around the World

ORBCOMM and Africa Wildlife Tracking (AWT) in Action

AWT is leveraging ORBCOMM’s advanced satellite IoT technology to track and monitor animals of all sizes to support their conservation efforts.
AWT is leveraging ORBCOMM’s advanced satellite IoT technology to track and monitor animals of all sizes to support their conservation efforts.
AWT is leveraging ORBCOMM’s advanced satellite IoT technology to track and monitor animals of all sizes to support their conservation efforts.

Tracking and monitoring solutions help reduce poaching, protect endangered wildlife and deliver valuable insights into animal behavior for researchers and conservationists

ROCHELLE PARK, N.J., Oct. 07, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — ORBCOMM Inc. (Nasdaq: ORBC), a global provider of Internet of Things (IoT) solutions, today announced that Africa Wildlife Tracking (AWT), the leader in tracking wildlife, is leveraging ORBCOMM’s advanced satellite IoT technology to track and monitor animals of all sizes to support their conservation efforts. With the added threat of the COVID-19 pandemic and the need to supply local populations with food, poaching is likely to increase, making

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Wildlife conservation undermines the rights of indigenous people and local communities in India

Wildlife conservation undermines the rights of indigenous people and local communities in India
Featured map in the EJAtlas. Credit: Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

An interactive map developed by the Environmental Justice Atlas team at the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) reveals that certain forms of wildlife conservation undermine the rights of indigenous people and local communities living within protected areas across India.


The interactive map, led by ICTA-UAB researcher Eleonora Fanari and carried out in collaboration with India’s environmental organization Kalpavriksh, has been launched during the India’s National Wildlife Week. The map is a product of three years of extensive research covering 26 protected areas, carried out in association with numerous organizations, activists and independent scholars, struggling against violations across the ground and in the courts.

A strict protect-and-conserve model, favored by a powerful Indian conservation lobby, has increased the network of protected areas from 67 in 1988 to 870 in 2020. However, these lands

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How to Revolutionize Biodiversity Conservation in the U.S.

The recently released 2020 Democratic Party platform contains a lot of policies that will excite scientists and environmentalists, including an aggressive agenda to fight climate change, the return of science-based decision making to the EPA, and environmental justice. There’s one game-changing passage, however, that’s received shockingly little notice outside of a small circle of experts—who are no less than ecstatic to see it mentioned at this level. Indeed, the inclusion of a statement like this in a national party platform and a presidential campaign promise represents the largest shift in United States science-based biodiversity conservation policy since the Endangered Species Act.

I’m speaking about “30 by 30,” the goal of using science-based decision-making to protect 30 percent of U.S. lands and waters by the year 2030. “Vice President Biden is committed to making the country more resilient to climate change and securing environmental justice, so I suggested that including the

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Funding crisis threatens zoos’ vital conservation work

Zoos’ vital conservation work is being put at risk by a Covid-related funding crisis.

Breeding programmes to rescue rare species may have to be cancelled, with many zoos facing the biggest cash crisis in their history.

The body that represents British zoos says a government rescue package is inaccessible for most of its members.

Only one zoo has claimed successfully, the BBC has learned.

Zoos face huge income losses due to lockdown and reduced visitor numbers. Ultimately, this will impact on their ability to care for species which are the last of their kind on Earth, and now found only in zoos.

“The extinct-in-the-wild species are absolutely dependent on human care,” said Dr John Ewen of the Zoological Society of London (ZSL).

“It’s our decision about which way to go forward that determines extinction or recovery.”

The scimitar-horned oryx is regarded as a conservation success story
The scimitar-horned oryx is regarded as a conservation success story

BBC News has discovered

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