Russian-US crew welcomed aboard the space station

MOSCOW (AP) — A trio of space travelers blasted off to the International Space Station on Wednesday, using for the first time a fast-track maneuver that allowed them to reach the orbiting outpost in just a little over three hours.

NASA’s Kate Rubins along with Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov of the Russian space agency Roscosmos lifted off as scheduled Wednesday morning from the Russia-leased Baikonur space launch facility in Kazakhstan for a six-month stint on the station.

For the first time, they tried a two-orbit approach and docked with the space station in just a little over three hours after lift-off. Previously it took twice as long for crews to reach the station.


Aboard the station, they were welcomed by the station’s NASA commander, Chris Cassidy, and Roscosmos cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner, who have been aboard the complex since April and are scheduled to return to Earth

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Russian-US Crew Launches on Fast Track to the Space Station | World News

By VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV, Associated Press

MOSCOW (AP) — A trio of space travelers launched successfully to the International Space Station, for the first time using a fast-track maneuver to reach the orbiting outpost in just three hours.

NASA’s Kate Rubins along with Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov of the Russian space agency Roscosmos lifted off as scheduled Wednesday morning from the Russia-leased Baikonur space launch facility in Kazakhstan for a six-month stint on the station.

For the first time, they tried a two-orbit approach and docked with the space station in just a little over three hours after lift-off. Previously it took twice as long for crews to reach the station.

They will join the station’s NASA commander, Chris Cassidy, and Roscosmos cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner, who have been aboard the complex since April and are scheduled to return to Earth in a week.

Speaking during Tuesday’s pre-launch

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Russia Launches Fresh Crew To ISS On Fast-track Journey

Two cosmonauts and a NASA astronaut blasted off on a high-speed journey to the International Space Station Wednesday, in the first such launch aboard a Russian capsule since SpaceX’s game-changing debut manned flight from US soil.

Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov of Roscosmos and NASA’s Kathleen Rubins launched from the Russian-operated Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 0545 GMT on Wednesday.

A NASA TV commentator said everything was normal, citing communications between Russian mission control and the crew, while Roscosmos said the capsule had successfully gone into orbit.

The three-member crew launched from the Russian-operated Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan The three-member crew launched from the Russian-operated Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan Photo: Russian Space Agency Roscosmos / Handout

Their journey will be the first manned flight to the ISS to last just over three hours before docking — a new fast-track profile that takes half the time of standard trips to the orbital lab.

Only an unmanned Progress cargo space ship has previously

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NASA Delays Launch of Crew Dragon’s Crew-1 Mission

NASA has delayed the launch of the first operational crewed flight of SpaceX’s Crew Dragon capsule to the International Space Station (ISS).

Originally scheduled for October 31, the mission is now targeted for “no sooner than early-to-mid November” to give launch provider SpaceX more time to deal with an issue with Falcon 9 first-stage engine gas generators that came to light during a recent non-NASA launch attempt.

There’s much focus on the Crew-1 mission as it will be the first operational crewed flight using SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft following its first successful human test flight to and from the ISS with NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken over the summer. The Demo-1 mission was notable not only for being the first crewed flight for the SpaceX capsule, but also because it marked the first astronaut launch from U.S. soil since the end of the space shuttle program in 2011,

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NASA delays commercial crew mission to study Falcon 9 engine issue

WASHINGTON — NASA is delaying the launch of the first operational SpaceX commercial crew mission to the first half of November to provide more time to review a problem during a recent Falcon 9 launch attempt.

NASA announced Oct. 10 the Crew-1 mission, which was scheduled to launch on a Falcon 9 in the early morning hours of Oct. 31 from the Kennedy Space Center, will now launch no earlier than early to mid-November.

The delay, the agency said, will provide more time for SpaceX “to complete hardware testing and data reviews as the company evaluates off-nominal behavior of Falcon 9 first stage engine gas generators observed during a recent non-NASA mission launch attempt.” NASA did not identify the specific launch attempt in question, but an Oct. 2 launch of a Falcon 9 carrying a GPS 3 satellite was scrubbed just two seconds before liftoff because of SpaceX Chief Executive

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Veteran astronaut steps down from long-delayed Boeing commercial crew test flight

Christopher Ferguson, commander of the final space shuttle flight and now a Boeing executive, has stepped down as commander of the first piloted test flight of the company’s troubled CST-100 Starliner commercial spacecraft, he and Boeing announced Wednesday. He has been replaced by NASA astronaut Barry “Butch” Wilmore.

“I’m taking on a new mission, one that keeps my feet planted here firmly on Earth and prioritizes my most important crew — my family,” Ferguson tweeted. “I’ll still be working hard with the #Starliner team and the @NASA_Astronauts on our crew.”

In a video attached to the tweet, Ferguson, 59 and a father

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5 ways SpaceX is changing Crew Dragon flight for next NASA astronauts

  • SpaceX is set to launch four astronauts to the space station for NASA later this month.
  • After inspecting the data from its first astronaut flight, SpaceX made four big upgrades to its Crew Dragon spaceship.
  • The next capsule will have new maneuvering capabilities, a reinforced heat shield, longer-lasting solar panels, and better parachute-deployment sensors.
  • SpaceX is also promising a clearer ocean landing site without a crowd of boats.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

SpaceX showed the world that its Crew Dragon can safely carry NASA astronauts to and from space this summer.

Now the company is preparing the spaceship for its biggest feat yet: routine flights to and from the International Space Station.

SpaceX’s first mission for NASA was a test flight called Demo-2. It rocketed astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley into orbit, after which their Crew Dragon capsule docked to the space station. They stayed there

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Space station air leak forces middle-of-night crew wakeup

Updated

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SpaceX improved Crew Dragon capsule for planned Oct. 31 launch

Astronauts make round trip to space station from U.S. soil

NASA astronaut Douglas Hurley (C) waves to onlookers as he boards a plane at Naval Air Station Pensacola to return him and NASA astronaut Robert Behnken home to Houston a few hours after the duo landed in their SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour spacecraft off the coast of Pensacola, Fla,, on August 2, 2020. Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA | License Photo

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NASA targeting Halloween for next SpaceX Crew Dragon astronaut launch

NASA now plans to launch four astronauts to the International Space Station aboard a SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft on October 31, a Halloween flight that will mark the first operational use of the capsule following a successful piloted test flight earlier this summer.

The space agency initially targeted October 23 for the “Crew 1” mission, just nine days after the October 14 launch of two cosmonauts and NASA astronaut Kate Rubins aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft and two days after NASA flier Chris Cassidy and two cosmonaut crewmates return to Earth on October 21 aboard another Soyuz.

By delaying the Crew Dragon flight to October 31, the station crew and flight controllers in the U.S., Russia, Europe, Canada and Japan will get a chance to catch their collective breath while allowing additional time to resolve any open issues.

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NASA’s SpaceX Crew 1 astronauts (L-R): Shannon Walker, Victor Glover, Michael Hopkins
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