India Gold Imports Dip After Brief Rebound as Prices Curb Demand

Gold imports had risen in July and August as jewelers readied stocks ahead of festivals.

Photographer: Sanjay Kanojia/AFP via Getty Images

Gold imports by India slumped in September after a short-lived rebound as high prices prompted buyers to defer purchases.

Inbound shipments into the world’s second-biggest bullion consumer fell 38% in September from a year earlier to 8.4 tons, according to a person familiar with the data, who asked not to be identified as the information isn’t public. Imports were down from 35.5 tons in August. Finance Ministry spokesman Rajesh Malhotra didn’t immediately respond to a call to his mobile phone.

Weak Appetite

India’s gold imports dip again in September

Source: India’s Finance Ministry Official

Imports had risen in July and August as jewelers readied stocks ahead of festivals. But demand has cooled as buyers hold off on purchases in a bet that prices

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Twitter bans calls for polling disruptions and early victory declarations to curb election abuse

Twitter’s moves, like those announced recently by Facebook, are aimed mainly at combating efforts to manipulate the political landscape at critical moments in the hotly contested national vote. The policy changes are the culmination of years of reforms intended to prevent a repeat of 2016′s electoral debacle on social media, when disinformation, false news reports and Russian interference rampaged virtually unchecked across all major platforms.

“Twitter has a critical role to play in protecting the integrity of the election conversation, and we encourage candidates, campaigns, news outlets and voters to use Twitter respectfully and to recognize our collective responsibility to the electorate to guarantee a safe, fair and legitimate democratic process this November,” company officials said in a blog post published at noon Friday. The authors were Vijaya Gadde, the Legal, Policy and Trust & Safety Lead at Twitter, and Kayvon Beykpour, its product lead.

The moves are likely to

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Research may curb economic losses to power plants after earthquakes — ScienceDaily

Sitting atop power transformers are wavy shaped bushing systems that play a critical role in supplying communities with electricity. However, these objects are also susceptible to breaking during earthquakes. Once damaged, bushings can cause widespread outages and burden the state with expensive repairs.

In a recent study, Texas A&M University researchers have shown that during high seismic activity, the structural integrity of bushing systems can be better maintained by reinforcing their bases with steel stiffeners. Also, by using probability-based loss assessment studies, they found that the economic burden due to damage to bushing systems from earthquakes is up to 10 times lower for steel-reinforced transformer bushing systems compared to other bushing configurations.

“Transformer bushing systems are vital to electrical substation networks, and these components are especially vulnerable in high-seismic regions, like in California or parts of the northeast,” said Dr. Maria Koliou, assistant professor in the Zachry Department of Civil

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Can Technology Help Curb The ‘Shecession’?

Kim Lessley, Director of Solution Marketing, SAP

The economic impact of COVID-19 is being felt across the globe, but it has not been distributed equally. The Guardian reported that by the end of April, women’s job losses had erased a decade of employment gains. In a situation that is mirrored in many countries, the U.S. is in the midst of its first ‘shecession’ – an economic downturn where job and income losses are affecting more women than men.

It’s vitally important for the benefit of everyone in society that this disparity be resolved, that burdens and stresses be shared equitably, and that they are minimized where possible. Technology has enabled many businesses to adapt and continue operating in this remote-first era, so can technology also play a role in reversing the shecession at both the business and individual levels?

I had the pleasure of taking part in a recent

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After boycotts, advertisers and social media giants agree on steps to curb hate speech

(Reuters) — Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter have agreed on first steps to curb harmful content online, big advertisers announced on Wednesday, following boycotts of social media platforms accused of tolerating hate speech.

Under the deal, announced by the World Federation of Advertisers, common definitions would be adopted for forms of harmful content such as hate speech and bullying, and platforms would adopt harmonized reporting standards. The deal comes less than six weeks before a polarizing U.S. presidential election.

Three months ago, major advertisers boycotted Facebook in the wake of anti-racism demonstrations that followed the death of George Floyd, an American Black man, in police custody in Minneapolis.

Advertisers have complained for years that big social media companies do too little to prevent ads from appearing alongside hate speech, fake news, and other harmful content. Big tech companies have begun taking steps to fend off calls for more regulation.

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