Deadly Snake Captured From Home After Found Slithering Under Aquarium, Rescue Caught On Camera

A deadly snake was captured after it was found under an aquarium inside a home in Australia earlier this month.

Jack Hogan with Snake Catcher Northern Rivers 24/7  arrived at the home after receiving information that a snake was seen slithering under the aquarium.

“We received a call for a greenish Snake that was seen slithering under this Bangalow residents’ Aquarium!” he wrote in a Facebook post.

However, Hogan was shocked after he stumbled upon the venomous Eastern Brown Snake while attempting to capture the reptile.

“I suspected the Snake to be a harmless Common Tree Snake as we see a lot of them in the area. After poking around with my hands and waiving my big head around for a while I stumbled upon this gorgeous Eastern Brown Snake all curled up behind the stereo!!” he wrote in the post.

Video of the rescue showed the snake catcher moving

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Tardigrades survive deadly radiation by glowing in the dark

Tardigrade
This tardigrade uses fluorescence to resist lethal UV radiation

Harikumar R Suma & Sandeep M Eswarappa

A tiny tardigrade can survive intense ultraviolet radiation for an hour by glowing in the dark. “It acts like a shield,” says Sandeep Eswarappa at the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore.

Tardigrades, also known as water bears, are animals around 1 millimetre long. They are famous for being able to withstand extreme conditions that would kill most organisms, such as being completely dried out.

Studying moss at their institute’s campus, Eswarappa and his colleagues found what may be a new species of tardigrade, though they don’t yet have enough information to formally describe it. For now, they are calling it Paramacrobiotus BLR, short for Bangalore.

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“We found this particular tardigrade in many places, especially in places that are well lit with sunlight,” says Eswarappa. The researchers

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How deadly parasites ‘glide’ into human cells — ScienceDaily

In biological terms, gliding refers to the type of movement during which a cell moves along a surface without changing its shape. This form of movement is unique to parasites from the phylum Apicomplexa, such as Plasmodium and Toxoplasma. Both parasites, which are transmitted by mosquitoes and cats, have an enormous impact on global heath. Plasmodium causes 228 million malaria infections and around 400,000 deaths per year. Toxoplasma, which infects even one third of the human population, can cause severe symptoms in some people, and is particularly dangerous during pregnancy.

Gliding enables the Apicomplexa parasites to enter and move between host cells. For example, upon entering the human body through a mosquito bite, Plasmodium glides through human skin before crossing into human blood vessels. This type of motion relies on actin and myosin, which are the same proteins that enable muscle movement in humans and other vertebrates. Myosin has a

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Rare Peacock Stars Could Potentially Detonate Deadly Gamma Rays In The Milky Way [Video]

KEY POINTS

  • Gamma-ray bursts are one of the most energetic occurrences in the universe
  • Apep’s two stars are 10 to 15 times more massive and 100,000 times brighter than the Sun
  • The two stars also orbit each other about every 125 years

Apep, one of the Wolf-Rayets binary star systems dubbed as the “exotic peacocks of the stellar world” discovered in 2018, was found to have the capacity to detonate long gamma ray bursts that are potentially deadly. If it detonates, the explosion could be something never seen in the Milky Way before, according to scientists.

“As well as exhibiting all the usual extreme behavior of Wolf-Rayets, Apep’s main star looks to be rapidly rotating. This means it could have all the ingredients to detonate a long gamma-ray burst when it goes supernova,” Peter Tuthill, study lead and professor from the University of Sydney, said in a press release. 

In

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Facebook removes Trump post claiming COVID-19 is less deadly than flu

  • Facebook removed a post from President Donald Trump on Tuesday that falsely claimed COVID-19 was less deadly than the flu, CNN first reported.
  • In the post, Trump said COVID-19 was “far less lethal” than the flu in “most populations.” In fact, the US coronavirus death toll in the first nine months of 2020 would already make it the second-deadliest US flu season on record by far.
  • The post violated Facebook’s rules on COVID-19 misinformation, which bans false claims about the severity of the virus.
  • Trump posted the same message to Twitter, which did not remove the post but instead added a public-interest notice saying the tweet broke its rules on COVID-19 misinformation.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Facebook removed a post from President Donald Trump on Tuesday that falsely claimed COVID-19 was less deadly than the flu.

Facebook determined that Trump’s post violated its COVID-19 misinformation policies, which

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