‘Genshin Impact’ To Debut Dragonspine Region In December, Targeting Regularly Scheduled Events

KEY POINTS

  • Dragonspine, the game’s new region, will be released on Dec. 23
  • Multiple versions are being developed simultaneously to ensure regularly scheduled content
  • New versions are being developed in line with in-game cultures and calendar events

“Genshin Impact” developer miHoYo announced a new in-game area, Dragonspine to debut on Dec. 23. The developer also shared plans on regular roadmap updates.

Currently, players of “Genshin Impact” can visit two nations, Mondstadt and Liyue.

miHoYo announced on the “Genshin Impact” blog that, on Dec. 23, the area to be known as Dragonspine will be revealed as part of Version 1.2 of the game. The developer promises to do its best to release a version update every six weeks, ideally on a Wednesday, with every version coming with its own themed activities.

Currently, VG24/7 notes that the following versions have been targeted with their respective events:

  • Version 1.1 – Estimated to arrive
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AirPods Studio may debut, suggests latest online store update

A few hours from now, Apple will finally take the covers off what they have in store for 2020. So far, among the product reveals they had this year which caught consumers by surprise include the iPhone SE, Magic Keyboard for iPad, and the Apple Watch SE. The tech industry already knows that the iPhone 12 series will headline the “Hi, Speed” event later. However, with third-party audio products and even its Beats by Dr. Dre page no longer up on its website, the AirPods Studio might debut soon.



Tim Cook standing in front of a window: Apple CEO Tim Cook


Apple CEO Tim Cook

Before iOS 14 officially became available on Sept. 16, data miners somehow gained access to an unreleased copy of the software. After digging around in the code, they supposedly found clues that hinted at an unannounced pair of headphones and several other devices. To date, Apple has never manufactured its own full-size headphones and opted to stick

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Huawei tweets it will debut its Mate 40 devices on October 22nd

Huawei has tweeted that it will reveal its Mate 40 series on October 22nd, likely the last of its phones to have Kirin chips— at least for the foreseeable future— due to the ongoing economic pressure from the US.

Richard Yu, CEO of Huawei’s consumer business unit, said at a conference August 7th that “this year may be the last generation of Huawei Kirin high-end chips.” The US has accused Huawei of building backdoors into network infrastructure, ostensibly to aid Chinese government spying efforts. Huawei has denied the Trump administration’s accusations of spying.

But the Trump administration placed Huawei and 114 of its affiliates on its Entity List in May 2019, which meant US firms were unable to sell technology to the company without explicit US government approval.

It also meant Google was barred from doing business with Huawei, preventing Huawei from obtaining an Android license, and keeping Google apps

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Apple’s ‘iPhone 12’ debut will be ‘most significant iPhone event in years,’ says Morgan Stanley

Ahead of Apple’s “iPhone 12” event on Oct. 13, Morgan Stanley is raising its iPhone estimates on new average selling price (ASP) analysis and iPhone build data.

In a research note to investors seen by AppleInsider, lead analyst Katy Huberty writes that the bank’s iPhone mix and pricing analysis indicates that Wall Street’s unit build and ASP estimates “remain too low” for 2021.

The upcoming “iPhone 12” and “iPhone 12 Pro” launch will be the “most significant iPhone event in years,” Huberty writes. She also points out that it comes at a key time for the company as device replacement cycles have lengthened to more than four years. Other factors could include increasing adoption of device trade-ins and gains in markets like Europe, the Middle East, and Asia.

Morgan Stanley’s Asia hardware technology team forecasts a total of 82 million iPhone builds in the December quarter, which suggests about

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Apple finally set the date for its latest iPhone’s debut

Apple has set the date for its latest iPhone’s debut. The new device, rumored to be called the iPhone 12, is expected to include superfast 5G wireless connectivity and a new, iPad-inspired design, and it will be unveiled on Oct. 13 at 10 a.m. PT. (1 p.m. ET, 6 p.m. BST). No official word yet on price or release date, but here’s what the rumors say. Like Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference, and its September Apple Watch and iPad announcements, the iPhone event will be held entirely online. The event will be streamed via Apple’s website, and here’s how to watch it.



a close up of a camera: Angela Lang/CNET


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Angela Lang/CNET

Apple’s fall product launch this year is expected to touch off a wave of upgrade purchases, analysts say, with fans eyeing the iPhone’s rumored new 5G capabilities and boxier look, similar to that of the iPad Pro . A “staggering”

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iPhone 12: Apple finally set the date for its latest iPhone’s debut

apple-iphone-11-camera-6806

Angela Lang/CNET

This story is part of Apple Event, our full coverage of the latest news from Apple headquarters.

Apple has set the date for its latest iPhone’s debut. The new device, rumored to be called the iPhone 12, is expected to include super-fast 5G wireless connectivity and a new, iPad-inspired design, and it will be unveiled on Oct. 13 at 10 a.m. PT. Like Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference, and its September Apple Watch and iPad announcements, the iPhone event will be held entirely online. The event will be streamed via Apple’s website.

Apple’s fall product launch this year is expected to touch off a wave of upgrade purchases, analysts say, with fans eyeing the iPhone’s rumored new 5G capabilities and boxier look, similar to that of the iPad Pro. A “staggering” 53% of respondents plan to buy this year’s iPhone, according to a survey by electronics

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Secretive, never profitable Palantir makes market debut

BOSTON (AP) — Seventeen years after it was born with the help of CIA seed money, the data-mining outfit Palantir Technologies is finally going public in the biggest Wall Street tech offering since last year’s debut of Slack and Uber.

Never profitable and dogged by ethical objections for assisting in the Trump administration’s deportation crackdown, Palantir forged ahead Wednesday with a direct listing of its stock, gaining 31% in its first trading day.

Rather than selling newly minted shares to raise money; Palantir listed existed shares for public trading. After a delay, trading began after noon and the stock closed at $9.50 after reaching a peak of $11.42.


The low-key stock strategy was in character for a secretive company long reliant on spies, cops and the military as customers — and whose founders are keeping voting control of the company.

The big question for both investors and company management: Can

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Asana jumps 10% in trading debut after opening at $4.2 billion valuation


  • Asana jumped as much as 10% in its first day of trading on Wednesday.
  • The stock opened at $27 per share, 29% above its reference price of $21. The ensuing climb marked a 10% increase from the opening price.
  • With 155 million shares outstanding, Asana sported a valuation of $4.6 billion at its peak after opening at $4.2 billion.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Asana jumped as much as 10% in its first day of trading on Wednesday, hitting a high of $29.79.

Asana is a work management software company based out of San Francisco. The firm went public via a direct listing rather than the traditional IPO route.

With a reference price of $21 per share, Asana opened at $27 per share in the first minute of trade, giving it a valuation of $4.2 billion. At its peak on Wednesday, Asana sported a

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The Technology 202: Activists slam Palantir for its work with ICE ahead of market debut

But activist groups and human rights watchdogs say that the company’s track record of working with Immigration and Customs Enforcement and countries with questionable human rights records makes it a bad investment. They spent the last week protesting online and in-person to highlight concerns to investors ahead of the public listing. 

“There is a high risk that Palantir is contributing to human rights violations of asylum-seekers and migrants through the ways the company’s technology facilitates ICE operations,” Amnesty International said in a report released yesterday that accused Palantir of failing to guarantee its software isn’t being used to aid in human rights abuses and racial profiling against migrants. Palantir, which declined to comment for this piece citing its “quiet period” running up to the public listing, has said its software is not used for raids or deportations. 

Co-founded by Peter Thiel, a prominent donor to President Trump, the company has

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Oppo Watch review: Late to the party, but a solid debut from smartphone newcomer

The good

The Oppo looks, well, like a smartwatch. The polished, black glass screen and rubber band are simple, sleek and refined. Call it uninspired if you will, but there isn’t much wriggle room to defy expectations in smartwatch design aesthetics.

As far as the profile goes, I actually quite liked the size and shape. It didn’t feel bulky on my wrist, was wearable throughout the day, and I found myself using it as I would a regular watch: to check the time. 

Android’s WearOS software makes using the Oppo Watch intuitive and straightforward, with no additional bells and whistles. In short, the software is about as groundbreaking as the design. There’s no point in reinventing the wheel.

Switching between apps is easy and responding to text and Facebook messages using the handy voice input was fun, even if it made me look like Inspector Gadget. 

Be warned, though, talking

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