NASA animation tracks the end of Tropical Storm Delta

NASA animation tracks the end of Tropical Storm Delta  
NASA’s Terra satellite provided a visible image to forecasters of Tropical Storm Delta moving through the southeastern U.S. on Oct. 11 at 1:30 p.m. EDT. At the time of the image, the storm was centered over northern Alabama. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS).

NASA’s Terra satellite obtained visible imagery as Tropical Storm Delta made landfall in Louisiana and moved northeastward soaking the U.S. southeast and Mid-Atlantic states.


NASA satellite view: Delta’s organization

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Delta on Oct. 11 at 1:30 p.m. EDT. The storm still appeared circular in imagery. At the time, it was centered over northern Alabama. At the time Terra passed overhead, Delta had weakened to a tropical depression with maximum sustained winds near 25 mph (35 kph).

Visible imagery from NASA’s Terra

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As Delta makes landfall, Southwest Louisiana is still without a working radar

It’s mobile radar to the rescue, and not a moment too soon.



a small clock tower in the middle of a field: The radar dome at the NWS Lake Charles sits on top of a tower that was battered by winds and is now out of commission as another hurricane heads toward it.


© NWS Lake Charles
The radar dome at the NWS Lake Charles sits on top of a tower that was battered by winds and is now out of commission as another hurricane heads toward it.

This is the story of how a moving research radar will be helping the Lake Charles, Louisiana, National Weather Service (NWS) outpost, whose radar was broken during Hurricane Laura.

The Lake Charles NWS office and radar are both located at the Lake Charles Regional Airport, which also took a significant hit during Laura.

The radar dome sits on top of an over 60-foot tower, and since wind speeds are often stronger the higher you go up, this likely led to its demise.

The problem is, the radar equipment is still not fixed, and another hurricane arrived Friday night in the the same area

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As Delta barrels toward the coast Southwest Louisiana is still without a working radar

It’s mobile radar to the rescue, and not a moment too soon.



a small clock tower in the middle of a field: The radar dome at the NWS Lake Charles sits on top of a tower that was battered by winds and is now out of commission as another hurricane heads toward it.


© NWS Lake Charles
The radar dome at the NWS Lake Charles sits on top of a tower that was battered by winds and is now out of commission as another hurricane heads toward it.

This is the story of how a moving research radar will be helping the Lake Charles, Louisiana, National Weather Service (NWS) outpost, whose radar was broken during Hurricane Laura.

The Lake Charles NWS office and radar are both located at the Lake Charles Regional Airport, which also took a significant hit during Laura.

The radar dome sits on top of an over 60 foot tower, and since wind speeds are often stronger the higher you go up, this likely led to its demise.

The problem is, the radar equipment is still not fixed, and another hurricane is on its way to the same

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Hurricane Delta bears striking resemblance to Wilma, the Atlantic’s most intense hurricane on record

Hurricane Delta, now a major Category 4 storm, has strengthened at an incredible rate: more than 85 mph over 24 hours. It’s the fastest rate of intensification in the Caribbean since Hurricane Wilma in 2005, when that storm went from 75 mph to 185 mph in just 24 hours time.

Delta’s rapid intensification is no coincidence. Memorable storms like this season’s Hurricane Laura, and past season storms like Michael and Harvey, have done the same. Over the past few decades, rapid intensification has been increasing by about 3 to 4 mph per decade due to hotter waters from human-caused climate change. That means a system in 1980 that may have intensified by 40 mph in 24 hours might now intensify at 55 mph in 24 hours. 

But Delta is looking especially similar to Wilma, the most intense storm on record in the Atlantic. And it could similarly have a

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Watch ULA Launch a Spy Satellite on a Delta IV Heavy Rocket Tonight

A Delta Heavy IV rocket launches NASA’s Parker Solar Probe from Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral in August 2018.

A Delta Heavy IV rocket launches NASA’s Parker Solar Probe from Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral in August 2018.
Photo: Bill Ingalls/NASA (Getty Images)

A United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket carrying a classified payload for the National Reconnaissance Office will take off from Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex-37 in Florida shortly before midnight on Wednesday. Assuming, that is, there isn’t another one of the last-minute delays that have hounded the mission for months.

The rocket and its semi-mysterious payload, dubbed NROL-44, were originally slated to take off in June. But NROL-44 was delayed until Aug. 29 with no explanation ever offered to the public, according to Ars Technica. It then malfunctioned on that date, with a faulty part causing a hotfire abort after its three RS-68 engines had already begun firing. Repairs took weeks.

NROL-44 was then scheduled to take off on Sept.

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You can watch a US spy satellite launch on a giant Delta IV Heavy rocket tonight. Here’s how.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A new U.S. spy satellite will launch into space early Saturday (Sept. 27) on the mightiest rocket built by the United Launch Alliance (ULA): the massive Delta IV Heavy.

The booster is set to blast off overnight at 12:10 a.m. EDT (0410  GMT) from Pad 37 here at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to carry the classified NROL-44 satellite into orbit for the  the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO). You  can watch all the fiery action live online, courtesy of ULA. Launch coverage will begin about 20 minutes prior to liftoff, and you can watch the launch live here and on the Space.com homepage or directly via the ULA webcast. 

The mission has been delayed nearly a month after a rare, last-second abort on the launch pad on Aug. 29. According to ULA, the launch window lasts about 94 minutes.

Declassified: Vintage US spy satellites and

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Rocket Report: Starship pops on purpose, Delta IV Heavy ready to try again

Wide-angle view of a rocket liftoff from a grassy field.
Enlarge / Firefly tests the first stage of its Alpha rocket.

Welcome to Edition 3.17 of the Rocket Report! Weather and technical issues permitting, we’re looking at a busy weekend in Florida, with a Delta IV Heavy booster set for liftoff early on Saturday, followed by a Falcon 9 launch on Sunday morning. In the meantime, catch up on all the booster news below.

As always, we welcome reader submissions, and if you don’t want to miss an issue, please subscribe using the box below (the form will not appear on AMP-enabled versions of the site). Each report will include information on small-, medium-, and heavy-lift rockets as well as a quick look ahead at the next three launches on the calendar.

New Shepard scrubs launch attempt. On Thursday, Blue Origin scrubbed the first launch attempt of its first New Shepard rocket since December 2019. The mission was due

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