Detection technology could help keep e-scooters off sidewalks

Among the technology being tested is a system developed by the Cal Poly Digital Transformation Hub (DxHUB) that powers off a scooter when it is ridden on a sidewalk.

If embraced, such technology could ease growing conflicts over sidewalk use that have overwhelmed cities since e-scooters arrived more than two years ago, transportation and industry leaders say.

“If the companies put some effort behind it and continue to develop it, they could come up with a solution that is safe,” said Joseph Cevetello, chief information officer for Santa Monica, where the influx of scooters on sidewalks led the city to recruit DxHUB to develop a solution. The city is drafting regulations that would require scooter companies to employ sidewalk detection and other technology to help reduce sidewalk riding.

San Jose last year required companies operating in the city to come up with a sidewalk detection solution, prompting companies such as

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Innovation could improve detection of COVID-19 infections

COVID-19
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A multidisciplinary research team at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed a way to increase the sensitivity of the primary test used to detect the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19. Applying their findings to computerized test equipment could improve our ability to identify people who are infected but do not exhibit symptoms.


The team’s results, published in the scientific journal Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, describe a mathematical technique for perceiving comparatively faint signals in diagnostic test data that indicate the presence of the virus. These signals can escape detection when the number of viral particles found in a patient’s nasal swab test sample is low. The team’s method helps a modest signal stand out more clearly.

“Applying our technique could make the swab test up to 10 times more sensitive,” said Paul Patrone, a NIST physicist and a co-author on the

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Better detection of microwave radiation will improve thermal imaging, electronic warfare, radio communications — ScienceDaily

Army-funded research developed a new microwave radiation sensor with 100,000 times higher sensitivity than currently available commercial sensors. Researchers said better detection of microwave radiation will enable improved thermal imaging, electronic warfare, radio communications and radar.

Researchers published their study in the peer-reviewed journal Nature. The team includes scientists from Harvard University, The Institute of Photonic Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, and Raytheon BBN Technologies. The Army, in part, funded the work to fabricate this bolometer by exploiting the giant thermal response of graphene to microwave radiation.

“The microwave bolometer developed under this project is so sensitive that it is capable of detecting a single microwave photon, which is the smallest amount of energy in nature,” said Dr. Joe Qiu, program manager for solid-state electronics and electromagnetics, Army Research Office, an element of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory.

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Detection of gravitational wave ‘lensing’ could be some way off

space
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Gravitational wave scientists looking for evidence of “lensing,” in which the faintest gravitational wave signals become amplified, are unlikely to make these detections in the near future according to new analysis by scientists at the University of Birmingham.


A team in the University’s School of Physics and Astronomy and the Institute for Gravitational Wave Astronomy has analyzed currently available gravitational wave data to predict that these elusive signals are likely to remain undetected by the instruments currently operated by the LIGO and Virgo Collaboration.

The existence of gravitational lensing was predicted by Einstein and is a well-recognized phenomenon in relation to light waves. Light emitted by distant objects in the Universe is bent by the gravitational pull of other massive objects, such as galaxies when the light source passes behind them. When detected by the earth’s telescopes, this distortion might make the light-emitting object seem larger

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Army fields new chemical detection technology

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IMAGE: Research through the U.S. Army Small Business Technology Transfer program, results in a product to accurately detect chemical weapons at low concentration levels. It is now being used by National…
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Credit: U.S. Army

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C. — Chemical weapons pose a serious threat to civilian and warfighter lives, but technology from the U.S. Army Small Business Technology Transfer program reduces those risks. Researchers developed a product to detect chemical weapons accurately at low concentration levels.

Active Army, Reserve and National Guard units started to receive the Chemical Agent Disclosure Spray and the Contamination Indicator/Decontamination Assurance System, known as CIDAS. The Army is fielding it to all units in areas where there is a threat of chemical agents.

The Chemical Agent Disclosure Spray, purchased by FLIR Systems, Inc., has transitioned into the CIDAS Program of Record within the Joint Program Executive Office for CBRN Defense. The research,

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