The U.S. Air Force Looks To Advanced Manufacturing To Keep Existing Aircraft Flying And Develop Next-Gen Capabilities

What if there were Olympic events that weren’t physical, but were focused instead on completely geeking out on super-cool breakthrough technologies for real-world aerospace and defense challenges? Even better, what if they offered prize money totaling nearly a million dollars?

Now there are just such events, thanks to the U.S. Air Force’s Rapid Sustainment Office (RSO). In fact, participants in five such Olympic “sports” (or Technical Challenges, as the RSO calls them) have already been competing over the past few months. Those competitions will culminate when the winners are announced during next week’s four-day Advanced Manufacturing Olympics. This virtual conference runs from October 20-23, and features technology demonstrations, expert speakers from both industry and the military, virtual networking opportunities, and the awarding of prized for those Technical Challenges mentioned above.

“RSO is working to revolutionize

Read More
Read More

Scientists develop new land surface model to monitor global river water environment

yangtze river
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Climate change and human activities, including heat emission, nitrogen (N) emission and water management, are altering the hydrothermal condition and N transport in the soil and river systems, thereby affecting the global nitrogen cycle and water environment.


“We need to assess the impacts of these human activities on global river temperature and riverine N transport,” said Prof. Xie Zhenghui from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. “Quantitative assessment can not only improve our understanding of the material and energy cycle that occur in response to anthropogenic disturbances, but also contribute to protecting river ecosystems.”

Xie and his collaborators from the Chinese Academy of Sciences incorporated the schemes of riverine dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) transport, river water temperature, and human activity into a land surface model, and thus developed a land surface model CAS-LSM. They applied the model to explore the impacts

Read More
Read More

Skoda develop a smartphone app that identifies what’s wrong with your car by listening to the engine



a person driving a car: MailOnline logo


© Provided by This Is Money
MailOnline logo

Skoda has developed new technology it believes will make car mechanics’ lives easier – or possible make them redundant entirely.

The Czech brand – which sits under VW Group’s ownership – says it has completed successful trials of a smartphone app that can listen to any thuds, bangs or clatter produced by a vehicle and diagnose the problem from the sound alone.

Called the Skoda Sound Analyser, the manufacturer says it has a 90 per cent success rate of identifying issues with cars correctly.



a hand holding a small camera: Smart-phone app for car mechanics: Skoda has developed an application that listens to a car's engine noise to identify if it has an underlying issue that needs to be fixed by a technician


© Provided by This Is Money
Smart-phone app for car mechanics: Skoda has developed an application that listens to a car’s engine noise to identify if it has an underlying issue that needs to be fixed by a technician

Skoda has developed the system in house to be used by technicians in its franchised servicing departments to quickly

Read More
Read More

Scientists develop new tool to forecast drought and water flow in the Colorado river — ScienceDaily

A team of scientists at Utah State University has developed a new tool to forecast drought and water flow in the Colorado River several years in advance. Although the river’s headwaters are in landlocked Wyoming and Colorado, water levels are linked to sea surface temperatures in parts of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans and the water’s long-term ocean memory. The group’s paper, “Colorado River water supply is predictable on multi-year timescales owning to long-term ocean memory” was published October 9 by Communications Earth and Environment, an open-access journal from Nature Research.

The Colorado River is the most important water resource in the semi-arid western United States and faces growing demand from users in California, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado and Utah. Because water shortages in the Colorado River impact energy production, food and drinking water security, forestry and tourism, tools to predict drought and low water levels could inform management

Read More
Read More

Nano-scientists develop a molecular tool to change the structure of a metal surface — ScienceDaily

The surface of metals plays a key role in many technologically relevant areas, such as catalysis, sensor technology and battery research. For example, the large-scale production of many chemical compounds takes place on metal surfaces, whose atomic structure determines if and how molecules react with one another. At the same time, the surface structure of a metal influences its electronic properties. This is particularly important for the efficiency of electronic components in batteries. Researchers worldwide are therefore working intensively on developing new kinds of methods to tailor the structure of metal surfaces at the atomic level.

A team of researchers at the University of Münster, consisting of physicists and chemists and led by Dr. Saeed Amirjalayer, has now developed a molecular tool which makes it possible, at the atomic level, to change the structure of a metal surface. Using computer simulations, it was possible to predict that the restructuring of

Read More
Read More

Jennifer Doudna’s New Gene Editing Company Launches With A $20 Million Round To Develop Genetic Medicines

What if you had a tool to change the genetic instructions that cause disease?

That’s what San Francisco-based Scribe Therapeutics hopes to do with its next-generation platform for gene editing.

Today, the company announced a collaboration with Biogen to develop CRISPR-based genetic medicines for neurological diseases, including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).

CRISPR, you may remember, is a powerful tool used to control the genes (or genetic instructions) that are active in plants, animals, and even humans. With CRISPR gene editing, researchers can “silence” undesirable traits, and, potentially, add desirable traits. 

Over the past few years, CRISPR gene editing has been used to reduce the severity of genetic deafness and treat sickle-cell anemia in mice. Today, CRISPR is considered

Read More
Read More

AbCheck s.r.o. Receives Grant to Further Develop a Discovery Technology for Functional …

Press release content from Globe Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

Pilsen, Czech Republic, October 6, 2020 – AbCheck s.r.o., a leader in providing antibody drug discovery, engineering and optimization services to the biotech and pharmaceutical industry, today announced that it has been awarded a grant supporting the further development of a unique approach for the discovery of functional antibodies using a microfluidic system. The grant was awarded from the Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic as the managing authority Operational Program, Enterprise and Innovation for Competitiveness.

The grant, entitled Research and development of a unique biotechnology for the isolation of antibodies with a therapeutic effect warrants up to €1.44 million over 3 years and supports the further development of the microfluidic technology for the discovery of rare therapeutic antibodies. The technology allows the screening of droplets containing

Read More
Read More

ExoTerra to develop upper stage for Virgin Orbit LauncherOne

SAN FRANCISCO – Colorado startup ExoTerra Resources announced a NASA Small Business Innovative Research contract Oct. 5 to develop a solar electric upper stage to boost small satellites traveling on Virgin Orbit’s LauncherOne beyond low Earth orbit.

With ExoTerra’s Solar Electric Propulsion Upper Stage, LauncherOne customers could reach destinations including geostationary orbit, trans-lunar injection orbit, Earth-Moon Lagrange points and low lunar orbit, according to the ExoTerra news release.

“This win allows ExoTerra to begin development of an upper stage that will deliver up to 150 kilograms of payload to the moon,” according to the news release. The upper stage also could transport 180-kilogram payloads to geostationary orbit, the release added.

Virgin Orbit announced plans in 2019 to send small satellites to Mars in 2022 for Polish satellite manufacturer SatRevolution.

“That announcement definitely has attracted the interest of many others in the growing aerospace community,” a Virgin Orbit spokesman said by

Read More
Read More

DARPA Awards $14 Million To Develop A Nuclear Rocket Engine

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has awarded Gryphon Technologies $14 million to develop a nuclear thermal propulsion system for the U.S. military. Part of DARPA’s Demonstration Rocket for Agile Cislunar Operations (DRACO) program, the High-Assay Low Enriched Uranium (HALEU) Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) system will be used to enable the military to carry out missions in cislunar space, meaning the area between the Earth and the orbit of the moon.

“A successfully demonstrated NTP system will provide a leap ahead in space-propulsion capability, allowing agile and rapid transit over vast distances as compared to present propulsion approaches,” Tabitha Dodson, Gryphon’s chief engineer on the support team and a national expert in NTP systems, said in a statement.

The militarization of space, this time largely involving the United States and China, has been in the news in recent years in a way that it hasn’t since the decades-old Space

Read More
Read More

Israeli defense giant picks five startups to develop future tech

JERUSALEM — Israel Aerospace Industries has chosen five startups to work with its engineers and experts to create products with the company, including sensors and artificial intelligence.

The five startups are QuantLR, Aigent-Tech, DST, Scopoli, and FVMat. Their work will focus on sensors for tracking people and objects, AI, monitoring systems, and landing gear, among other technologies.

IAI produces and supports a variety of defense systems for land, air and naval applications, such as a recent test of the Arrow 2 air defense weapon and a new sea-to-sea missile.

“IAI’s unique accelerator track allows the startups to work with IAI’s technology leaders, realize long-term business potential, leverage breakthrough technologies, and gain access to IAI’s customers,” the company said in a statement Oct. 1.

Among the companies selected, FVMat focuses on meta-materials, such as the production and design of materials with unique densities and stiffness. The firm will work with IAI

Read More
Read More