Trump gives overview of COVID-19 case in first on-camera interview since diagnosis

President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden campaign raises over M on day of VP debate Trump chastises Whitmer for calling him ‘complicit’ in extremism associated with kidnapping scheme Trump says he hopes to hold rally Saturday despite recent COVID-19 diagnosis MORE on Friday participated in his first on-camera interview since testing positive for COVID-19, during which he admitted that he remained hospitalized for observation after scans showed some congestion in his lungs and touted the benefits of his early treatment.

The president offered a rosy outlook of his path forward in a pre-recorded interview with Fox News medical contributor Marc Siegel. Trump spoke to Siegel from the Rose Garden, while the doctor was based in a network studio.

Trump insisted that he was feeling well and that he had been “medication free” since earlier in the day. But he acknowledged that he experienced fatigue and could have faced a more dire

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Trump says he’s ‘medication free,’ details COVID-19 recovery in first on-camera interview since diagnosis

President Trump opened up about his ongoing recovery from the novel coronavirus on “Tucker Carlson Tonight” Friday, sitting down for his first on-camera interview since he tested positive last week. 

Speaking to Fox News medical contributor Dr. Marc Siegel in a remote interview from the White House, Trump said he was “medication free” as of Friday and feeling “really, really strong.” 

The president acknowledged that before he went to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Oct. 2, he “didn’t feel very vital” and “didn’t feel like the president of the U.S. should feel.”

Trump returned to the White House on Monday after spending three nights at the Bethesda, Md. hospital. He touted the beneficial effects of Regeneron’s experimental antibody cocktail, which he said made a “tremendous difference” in his recovery.

TRUMP CAN RETURN TO ‘PUBLIC ENGAGEMENTS’ THIS WEEKEND, WHITE HOUSE PHYSICIAN SAYS

The president also said he underwent CT scans

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What Trump’s COVID diagnosis might mean for the 25th Amendment

The news that President Donald Trump tested positive for COVID-19 has thrown a monkey wrench into an already fraught election season. It’s raised questions about who would lead the country if the president were to become gravely ill, and when that might be determined. 



Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on October 9, 2020 to introduce legislation based on the 25th Amendment that would create a Commission on Presidential Capacity that would review a president's fitness for office. Drew Angerer/Getty Images


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Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on October 9, 2020 to introduce legislation based on the 25th Amendment that would create a Commission on Presidential Capacity that would review a president’s fitness for office. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Now there are new questions about who should be able to make the decision of when a president can’t fulfill his duties. On Friday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi introduced legislation that would allow Congress, using the 25th Amendment to the Constitution, to take power away from a president if he were to become incapacitated. But

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Trump to appear on ‘Tucker Carlson Tonight’ in first on-camera interview after COVID-19 diagnosis

President Trump is scheduled to make his first on-camera interview appearance on Friday since he announced last week that he tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

The interview will take place on “Tucker Carlson Tonight” at 8 p.m. ET. Dr. Marc Siegel will conduct a medical evaluation and interview during the program.

The public has largely received information about the president’s condition from his daily tweets and updates from his medical team.

TRUMP CAN RETURN TO ‘PUBLIC ENGAGEMENTS’ THIS WEEKEND, WHITE HOUSE PHYSICIAN SAYS

President Donald Trump walks out of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center to return to the White House after receiving treatments for COVID-19, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Donald Trump walks out of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center to return to the White House after receiving treatments for COVID-19, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

During a phone interview on “Hannity” Thursday, the president said he was doing “really good,” and that he would probably be tested again for the virus on Friday.

White House physician Sean Conley 

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Fox News medical contributor to conduct first Trump on-camera interview since COVID-19 diagnosis

A Fox News medical contributor will interview President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden campaign raises over M on day of VP debate Trump chastises Whitmer for calling him ‘complicit’ in extremism associated with kidnapping scheme Trump says he hopes to hold rally Saturday despite recent COVID-19 diagnosis MORE on camera Friday night for the first time since the president tested positive for COVID-19 last week.

Marc Siegel will conduct the interview remotely from New York, with Trump participating from the White House, Fox News said.

“[Trump] will discuss his current condition as well as his experience,” Fox News said in a statement Friday.

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The interview will air on “Tucker CarlsonTucker CarlsonFox News Media signs three-book deal with HarperCollins in launch of publishing platform Fox News tops broadcast networks for first time in 3rd quarter Will Chis Wallace’s debate topics favor Biden over Trump? MORE Tonight” at 8 p.m.

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Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis sparks hostile Twitter reaction against Asians

For example, in one since-deleted tweet to her 394,000 followers, pro-Trump former congressional candidate DeAnna Lorraine said that “China must pay for giving Trump COVID,” and swore that “we will have justice.”

Another Twitter user with 114,000 followers blamed Chinese President Xi Jinping for trying to assassinate Trump.

The anti-China rhetoric used by the Trump administration and its supporters throughout the pandemic has left Asian Americans vulnerable to racist attacks, researchers have previously found. Fear, hatred and misinformation online has led to verbal assaults, boycotts of Asian businesses and sometimes violence. A coalition of Asian American groups, along with San Francisco State University, reported this summer that 2,120 hate incidents against Asian Americans have taken place since March.

President Trump has been at the forefront of pushing a narrative that responsibility for the virus lies with China. In the first presidential debate on Sept. 29, Trump said the covid-19 crisis

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New tech could offer ‘faster, cheaper and mobile’ COVID-19 diagnosis

UQ tech could offer 'faster, cheaper and mobile' COVID-19 diagnosis
A simple dipstick allows genetic material to be extracted in as little as 30 seconds. Credit: The University of Queensland

Technology that helps to quickly extract and analyze genetic material could be used for cheap, accurate and mobile COVID-19 testing, including at airports and remote testing centers.

‘Dipstick’ technology, developed by the University of Queensland’s Professor Jimmy Botella and Dr. Michael Mason, allows genetic material to be extracted in as little as 30 seconds, with a full molecular diagnosis in 40 minutes.

“That process is currently achieved using large and expensive commercial set-ups that require multistep procedures and specialized laboratory equipment,” Professor Botella said.

“In contrast, our dipstick tech is incredibly cheap and can be used virtually anywhere, without the need for specialized equipment or a laboratory.

“Our tech enables the purification of DNA and RNA nucleic acids from patient samples—a critical step in COVID-19 diagnosis.

“Combined with a portable

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The Technology 202: Twitter’s response to Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis highlights inconsistencies in company’s handling of abuse

From Democratic Reps. Rashida Tlaib (Mich.) and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.):

Reps. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) and Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.) also responded to the company’s tweet.

Twitter on Saturday said it would do better:

The episode highlighted the broader issue of social media abuse directed at female politicians particularly from minority backgrounds. 

Female congresswomen are far more likely than their male counterparts to be targeted with abusive posts on Facebook and Twitter, according to a new analysis from the Institute for Strategic Dialogue shared exclusively with The Technology 202. And the research shows that Ocasio-Cortez and Omar received the highest proportion of abusive comments. 

The findings are particularly important in the final weeks of a contentious presidential election, where a Black and Asian American woman is for the first time on the presidential ticket. They’re also a reminder that vice presidential candidate and Sen. Kamala D. Harris (D-Calif.) is particularly vulnerable

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Trump’s diagnosis fuels uncertainty for skittish U.S. stock market

(Reuters) – Investors are gauging how a potential deterioration in President Donald Trump’s health could impact asset prices in coming weeks, as the U.S. leader remains hospitalized after being diagnosed with COVID-19.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump disembarks from the Marine One helicopter followed by White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows as he arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after the White House announced that he “will be working from the presidential offices at Walter Reed for the next few days” after testing positive for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Bethesda, Maryland, U.S., October 2, 2020. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

So far, markets have been comparatively sanguine: hopes of a breakthrough in talks among U.S. lawmakers on another stimulus package took the edge off a stock market selloff on Friday, with the S&P 500 losing less than 1% and so-called safe-haven assets seeing

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The Daily 202: A dozen questions to gauge the political ramifications of Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis

This October surprise upends the presidential campaign with just over a month until Election Day. This will draw fresh attention to Trump’s public and private squabbles with a number of the medical experts in his administration over how seriously to take the virus. The diagnosis will also make it difficult for the president to deflect attention to other issues. But it is impossible at this moment to state anything with certitude. How exactly this development impacts the final 32 days of the race depends on the answers to these dozen questions:

1) How sick will the president get? 

An unnamed White House official told the Associated Press this morning that the president is experiencing “mild symptoms” but did not specify.

The president’s physician, Sean Conley, said in a statement that the Trumps “are both well at this time, and they plan to remain at home within the White House during

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