Beat Future Infectious Diseases by Crowdsourcing Strategic Data

By Rich Murr, CIO, Epicor Software

To blunt the impact of COVID-19, a vast number of medical, industrial, and financial resources are being deployed. And while these efforts are important, we should also look ahead so that we are better able to prevent future pandemics by crowdsourcing strategic, available data that would offer a bigger picture.

As someone who previously served in the United States Marines and who now serves as a CIO for a software company, I can emphatically say that regardless of your line of work, one of the best first lines of defense is information – specifically, quality information that can be speedily obtained and assessed. In the case of fighting infectious diseases, this information is critical for our epidemiologists. They need information so that we can combat potential threats before they become widespread.

It’s clear that relying solely on closed societies, public health institutions, or the

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Admissions still low among Hispanic neighborhoods and for respiratory diseases — ScienceDaily

While declines in U.S. hospital admissions during the onset of COVID-19 has been well-documented, little is known about how admissions during the rebound varied by age, insurance coverage and socioeconomic groups. The decline in non-COVID-19 admissions was similar across all demographic subgroups but the partial rebound that followed shows that non-COVID-19 admissions for residents from Hispanic neighborhoods was significantly lower than for other groups. The findings are reported in a new study in Health Affairs (released as a Fast Track Ahead of Print article) conducted by a research team from Sound Physicians, Dartmouth College, and the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth.

“Our study shows that patients from Hispanic neighborhoods did not have the same rebound in non-COVID-19 admissions as other groups, which points to a much broader issue of healthcare access and equity for lower-income and minority patients,” said

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