Aptos Solar Technology’s DNA Modules Pass Extended Reliability Testing

Aptos Solar Technology, a supplier of high-performance solar modules, announces a successful completion of accelerated environmental tests performed by Renewable Energy Testing Center (RETC). The data revealed from testing confirms the reliability of Aptos Solar Technology’s DNATM modules for extreme weather conditions over an extended period of time.

As a leader in defining quality standards for renewable energy products, RETC provides a rigorous series of tests to ensure the durability of solar modules. Achieving recognition by RETC, in addition to holding standard UL & IEC certifications, makes the DNATM module by Aptos Solar Technology a competitive choice for those seeking durability in module performance.

“A high-quality PV module not only demonstrates high performance at standard test conditions but also performs well in real-world conditions over its intended service life. Aptos has shown a continued commitment to module quality and performance by diligently testing their products and ensuring their

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Study shows possible new way to create DNA base pairs — ScienceDaily

In the search for the chemical origins of life, researchers have found a possible alternative path for the emergence of the characteristic DNA pattern: According to the experiments, the characteristic DNA base pairs can form by dry heating, without water or other solvents. The team led by Ivan Halasz from the Rudjer Boskovic Institute and Ernest Mestrovic from the pharmaceutical company Xellia presents its observations from DESY’s X-ray source PETRA III in the journal Chemical Communications.

“One of the most intriguing questions in the search for the origin of life is how the chemical selection occurred and how the first biomolecules formed,” says Tomislav Stolar from the Rudjer Boskovic Institute in Zagreb, the first author on the paper. While living cells control the production of biomolecules with their sophisticated machinery, the first molecular and supramolecular building blocks of life were likely created by pure chemistry and without enzyme catalysis.

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Nanoparticles with synthetic DNA can control release of active agents — ScienceDaily

Medications often have unwanted side-effects. One reason is that they reach not only the unhealthy cells for which they are intended, but also reach and have an impact on healthy cells. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), working together with the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, have developed a stable nano-carrier for medications. A special mechanism makes sure the drugs are only released in diseased cells.

The human body is made up of billions of cells. In the case of cancer, the genome of several of these cells is changed pathologically so that the cells divide in an uncontrolled manner. The cause of virus infections is also found within the affected cells. During chemotherapy for example, drugs are used to try to destroy these cells. However, the therapy impacts the entire body, damaging healthy cells as well and resulting in side effects which are sometimes quite

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Cathy Freeman’s Olympic victory etched into Australia’s DNA 20 years on

Cathy Freeman’s triumphant Olympic moment two decades ago officially became part of Australia’s genome Friday, with the nation’s archivists using synthetic DNA data storage to preserve the footage.

As footage of Freeman’s 400m dash to Olympic glory was projected onto the sails of Sydney Opera House, the National Film and Sound Archive(NFSA) celebrated the digitisation and successful storage of the video in synthetic DNA.

“Tonight our celebration is two-fold, the anniversary of that race… and we celebrate the awesome technological innovation,” NFSA chair Gabrielle Trainor said.

The announcement marked exactly 20 years since Freeman raced into sporting history by becoming the first Aboriginal person to win an individual gold medal.

The DNA storage works by converting data stored in a computer’s binary code of ones and zeros -— in this case digitised footage -— and transcribing it into DNA code made of four chemical rungs: adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine.

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While a Fort Worth murder suspect grew old, the DNA science that jailed him grew up

The brother of a woman killed in 1974 said the technology law enforcement now uses to track down criminals has advanced greatly, and those hiding guilt should pray because they are being hunted and eventually they will be caught and punished.

Jim Walker made these comments on Tuesday, the day after Fort Worth police arrested a 77-year-old man who is facing a capital murder charge in the slaying of his sister, Carla Walker. The 17-year-old girl was abducted during a Valentine’s week date, then sexually assaulted and found dead three days later.

Glen Samuel McCurley, identified as the suspect in Walker’s slaying, remained in the Tarrant County Jail on Thursday with bond set at $100,000, according to jail records.

Edward Hueske, who was hired as a criminalist by the Fort Worth Police Department a month before Walker was killed, said this is a good resolution to this case.

“The

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