Facing an Outrageous Increase in App Traffic Due to COVID-19? Technology Fixes that Facilitate Scaling Up

FunkyFocus / Pixabay

Let us be straightforward about it…

Until a vaccine is in place, it would be difficult to bat away the virus of COVID -19 completely. Until then, humans and businesses need to go about their businesses with resilience and positivity. Companies, especially, have to think about whether to scale up or scale down their operations.

As it turns out, if you are into food delivery, logistics, or online learning, without a doubt, scaling up your applications will be on the top of your mind, what with consumers thronging the online stores and apps in significant numbers for purchases, delivery requests and more. The increased demand has pushed applications to their limits and beyond, leading to outages and other such issues. In short, businesses out there are struggling to scale up their applications.

If your company is witnessing an unprecedented increase in business and application load, all that

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NASA, SpaceX Delay Crew-1 Mission Due To ‘Off-Nominal Behavior’ From Falcon 9

KEY POINTS

  • NASA and SpaceX’s crewed mission has been delayed to November
  • The agency cited “off-nominal behavior” from the Falcon 9’s engine
  • The delay can provide more time to ensure the mission’s safety

NASA and SpaceX’s Crew-1 has been delayed due to “off-nominal” behavior from the Falcon 9.

It was in May when NASA and SpaceX successfully launched astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station (ISS), marking the first time that American astronauts launched from American soil in nearly a decade. But that successful mission was just a demonstration and the first actual crewed operational flight of a Crew Dragon spacecraft, the Crew-1 mission, was set for a late October launch following several delays.

But on Oct. 1, NASA released a statement on the Crew-1 mission, noting a new target of “no sooner than early-to-mid November.” The agency cited “off-nominal behavior” from the Falcon 9’s first

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What the workforce will look like in 2025 as it morphs due to pandemic

Carl D. Walsh/Portland Press Herald | Getty Images

The coronavirus pandemic has radically altered the way we work, and companies of all sizes are experimenting with new ways to manage their far-flung virtual organizations. According to experts, remote work is here to stay and even when the health crisis ends, a good portion of the workforce will remain working from home. The challenge is how to keep employees connected, drive innovation and collaboration, and keep a steady talent pipeline when people are geographically dispersed.

Companies are prototyping new HR models to keep up with this rapid pace of change. Some are embracing artificial intelligence and automation to keep operations on an even keel, gather data-driven insights about their employees, improve the talent search and manage global risk.

It’s a daunting task and it’s happening at a time when business leaders are already wrestling with economic shutdowns, health-care concerns, an upcoming

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Science More Highly Valued by UK Due to COVID-19

Science more highly valued by UK public due to COVID-19, but barriers to STEM education threaten future scientific development

BRACKNELL, UK / ACCESSWIRE / October 6, 2020 / Science and scientists have gained a renewed level of significance in the minds of the UK public due to COVID-19, according to new research released today from 3M, the science-based technology company.

In its 2020 State of Science Index (SOSI), conducted before and during the height of the pandemic, scepticism of science has declined amongst Britons for the first time in three years from 40 per cent pre-pandemic to 29 per cent today – representing one of the biggest declines of all countries surveyed in this annual global study.

As a result of COVID-19, three out of four (77 per cent) are now more likely to believe that science plays a critical role in solving public health crises and 92 per cent

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Science More Highly Valued by UK Due to COVID-19 – Press Release

Science more highly valued by UK public due to COVID-19, but barriers to STEM education threaten future scientific development

BRACKNELL, UK / ACCESSWIRE / October 6, 2020 / Science and scientists have gained a renewed level of significance in the minds of the UK public due to COVID-19, according to new research released today from 3M, the science-based technology company.

In its 2020 State of Science Index (SOSI), conducted before and during the height of the pandemic, scepticism of science has declined amongst Britons for the first time in three years from 40 per cent pre-pandemic to 29 per cent today – representing one of the biggest declines of all countries surveyed in this annual global study.

As a result of COVID-19, three out of four (77 per cent) are now more likely to believe that science plays a critical role in solving public health crises and 92 per cent

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Tech investment surges to unprecedented levels due to COVID-19

Global companies spent around $15 billion extra a week on technology during the pandemic’s first wave, Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO survey finds.

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Image: Harvey Mudd/KPMG

Global IT leaders spent around $15 billion extra a week on technology to enable safe and secure home working during COVID-19, according to the 2020 Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey. This was one of the biggest surges in technology investment in history— with the world’s IT leaders spending an additional 5% more of their IT budget to deal with the COVID-19 crisis, the survey said.

The technology leadership survey of over 4,200 IT leaders analyzed responses from organizations with a combined technology spend of over $250 billion. It also found that despite this huge surge of spending and security and privacy being the top investment during COVID-19, four in 10 IT leaders report that their company has experienced more cyberattacks.

Over three-quarters of these attacks were from

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Someday, even wet forests could burn due to climate change — ScienceDaily

Millions of years ago, fire swept across the planet, fueled by an oxygen-rich atmosphere in which even wet forests burned, according to new research by University of Colorado Boulder scientists.

The study, published today in Nature Geoscience, provides geochemical evidence showing that forest fires expanded dramatically, potentially burning up to 30 or 40 percent of global forests during a 100,000 year interval more than 90 million years ago. While today’s fires are exacerbated by dry conditions, they found that forest fires during this period increased even in wet regions due to changes in global climate.

“Studying this period in Earth’s history can shine light on how the modern and future Earth might behave under global change,” said F. Garrett Boudinot, lead author and recent PhD graduate in the Department of Geological Sciences.

Boudinot analyzed samples from a rock core that spans what is known as the Oceanic Anoxic Event

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Lidar study suggests carbon storage losses greater than thought in Amazon due to losses at edge of forests

LiDAR study suggests carbon storage losses greater than thought in Amazon due to losses at edge of forests
Graphic summary of the main results found in the work. Credit: Celso H. L. Silva Junior

An international team of researchers has found that carbon sequestering losses in the Amazon basin have been undermeasured due to omission of data representing losses at the edges of forests. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes using lidar to estimate the carbon sequestering abilities of trees along the edges of Amazon forests.


Prior research has shown that when part of a forest in the Amazon basin is cut down, the trees that remain at the edges of the forest are not as robust as those that are situated farther in. This is because they are more exposed to pollution, pesticides, herbicides, etc. In this new effort, the researchers noticed that the reduced sequestering abilities of such trees are not included in studies of carbon sequestering losses in

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SpaceX scrubs Starlink satellite launch Thursday due to ground sensor reading

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A Falcon 9 blasts off on Aug. 30.


SpaceX

The Falcon 9 rocket booster that sent NASA astronauts to the International Space Station in May is set to get recycled again when SpaceX sends 60 more Starlink satellites to orbit atop its column of fire, but it didn’t happen Thursday as planned. 

The launch, originally scheduled for September, has been postponed multiple times due to weather, including on Monday morning when heavy clouds above Florida’s Cape Canaveral prevented launch at the last second. On Thursday, another launch was scrubbed 18 seconds before blastoff due to an aberrant ground sensor reading. A new target launch date has not yet been announced. 

“All in a day’s work for the launch team. They’ll investigate, diagnose probable cause, fix the problem, and get us ready for the next launch

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SpaceX delays next Starlink satellite fleet launch due to bad weather

SpaceX postponed the launch of a new fleet of Starlink internet satellites today (Sept. 28) due to bad weather at the mission’s Florida launch site. 

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket was scheduled to launch 60 Starlink satellites from Pad 39A of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 10:22 a.m. EDT (1422 GMT), but thick clouds over the launch site prevented the flight. 

“Unfortunately, it looks like due to weather violations, we’re going to to have to scrub today,” Alex Seigel, a senior material planner with SpaceX, said in live commentary. “But again, the most important thing is reducing as much risk on the mission as possible, and with that comes waiting for a window of good weather.”

Related: SpaceX’s Starlink satellite megaconstellation launches in photos 

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying 60 Starlink internet satellites stands atop Pad 39A of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida during

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