Mars set for close approach to Earth this week, and you can see the show

nasamars

Mars will bright and beautiful in the October 2020 night sky.


NASA

Forget Halloween. This October is all about the glory of Mars, as the glimmering red planet puts on a show in the night sky. You can enjoy Mars as a bright point of light all month long, but there are two special dates to mark on your calendar: Oct. 6 when the planet makes a close approach to Earth, and Oct. 13, when it will be in opposition. 

Spotting Mars

Mars has a reputation as the “red” planet, but its color in the night sky is a little more on the Halloween side of the spectrum. It appears as a bright orange-red dot to the naked eye, like a little spot of glittering rust.

Mars’ distinctive color is one clue you’ve found

Read More
Read More

Cargo carriers warn that getting a COVID-19 vaccine to everyone on Earth could take up to two years



a large passenger jet sitting on top of a runway: Space on scheduled cargo flights is already filling up through February, with holiday shopping and consumer electronics leading the demand. vaalaa/Shutterstock.com


© vaalaa/Shutterstock.com
Space on scheduled cargo flights is already filling up through February, with holiday shopping and consumer electronics leading the demand. vaalaa/Shutterstock.com

  • Even if a coronavirus vaccine is approved soon, it will likely be years until it can be distributed around the world, according to cargo airline and logistics executives.
  • Challenging storage and shipping requirements, combined with reduced cargo availability and higher demand, are likely to delay distribution, according to a new Wall Street Journal report.
  • Although cargo airlines are trying to prepare, a host of unknowns — including where the vaccine will be made, how many doses are needed, and how it will need to be stored — means there’s only so much that can be organized in advance.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Even if a COVID-19 vaccine can be developed, approved, and mass produced quickly, getting it to countries and communities around the world

Read More
Read More

Scientists find promising ‘superhabitable’ planets that may be ‘better’ than Earth

This illustration shows an Earth-size planet orbiting a distant star.


NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech

When you title a research paper “In Search for a Planet Better than Earth,” you’re not messing around. Earth, the only place we know for sure hosts life, sets a high bar for all other planets. 

Washington State University (WSU) geobiologist Dirk Schulze-Makuch led a study published in the journal Astrobiology last month. The paper identifies two dozen exoplanets (planets located outside our solar system) that could be “superhabitable” worlds more suitable for life than our own.

The researchers created a set of criteria for planets to qualify as potentially superhabitable. This list includes an age of between 5 billion and 8 billions years old (Earth is about 4.5 billion years old) and a location within a star’s habitable zone where liquid

Read More
Read More

Some planets may be better for life than Earth

planet
Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain

Earth is not necessarily the best planet in the universe. Researchers have identified two dozen planets outside our solar system that may have conditions more suitable for life than our own. Some of these orbit stars that may be better than even our sun.


A study led by Washington State University scientist Dirk Schulze-Makuch recently published in the journal Astrobiology details characteristics of potential “superhabitable” planets, that include those that are older, a little larger, slightly warmer and possibly wetter than Earth. Life could also more easily thrive on planets that circle more slowly changing stars with longer lifespans than our sun.

The 24 top contenders for superhabitable planets are all more than 100 light years away, but Schulze-Makuch said the study could help focus future observation efforts, such as from NASA’s James Web Space Telescope, the LUVIOR space observatory and the European Space Agency’s PLATO

Read More
Read More

Watch Mars Make Its Closest Approach To Earth Until 2035

On October 6, 2020, Mars makes its closest approach to Earth until 2035.

Earth and Mars both orbit the Sun in the same direction, but

Read More
Read More

How Dan Sundheim became the LeBron James of investing, launched one of the hottest hedge funds on earth, and minted a billion-dollar fortune along the way

The world has changed drastically in the two years since D1 Capital launched.



Ole Andreas Halvorsen posing for the camera: Dan Sundheim has quickly become an investor to follow since launching his fund D1 Capital after working as the chief investment officer at Andreas Halvorsen's Viking Global. Alastair Grant/AP Photo; Streeter Lecka/Getty Images; Brendan McDermid/Reuters; Scott Olson/Getty Images; Samantha Lee/Business Insider


© Provided by Business Insider
Dan Sundheim has quickly become an investor to follow since launching his fund D1 Capital after working as the chief investment officer at Andreas Halvorsen’s Viking Global. Alastair Grant/AP Photo; Streeter Lecka/Getty Images; Brendan McDermid/Reuters; Scott Olson/Getty Images; Samantha Lee/Business Insider

And Dan Sundheim made money through it all, thanks to a string of bets that have emerged as winners in the new normal. The Wharton grad now has at least $1 billion in personal wealth between his assets in his firm, stake in the NBA’s Charlotte Hornets, real-estate portfolio, and art collection.

Loading...

Load Error

The former Viking Global Investors chief investment officer started trading at D1 in July 2018 with more than $5 billion — including more than $500 million of his own money — and hasn’t looked back.

Business Insider’s

Read More
Read More

The tech crisis that isn’t: China controls the world’s rare earth supply chains

senkaku-islands-by-al-jazeera-english-1.jpg

Photo of a Japanese Coast Guard vessel patrolling Uotsuri Island by Al Jazeera English, licensed under Creative Commons 2.0.

They’re called either the Diaoyu Archipelago or the Senkaku Islands — eight rocks just a few miles wide, if that, situated about 125 miles southwest of Okinawa. They’re uninhabited, and generally so strategically unimportant that during negotiations for the Treaty of San Francisco in 1951 that established Japan’s territorial borders, diplomats forgot to mention them. They remained “occupied” by the US until 1972. Today, Japan claims them, but so does China and so does Taiwan. From a distance, they look like the tops of old furniture floating just above the waterline after a flood.

Submerged reefs make for wonderful fishing. During the first week of September 2010, several unlicensed Chinese trawlers were spotted operating in what Japan calls the Senkaku. Depending on who tells the story, there may have been as

Read More
Read More

203-Foot NEA, 2 Others To Zip Past Earth This Weekend

KEY POINTS

  • A total of 3 asteroids will zip by Earth this weekend
  • 2020RZ3 has a diameter of 203 feet, taller than the Leaning Tower of Pisa
  • None of the 3 NEAs have been included in the European Space Agency’s Risk List

A total of three Near-Earth Asteroids will be zipping past Earth this weekend, with one reaching 203 feet in diameter.

According to the Close Approach Data Table from NASA’s  Center for Near-Earth Object Studies (CNEOS), asteroids 2020RZ3, 2020SY3, and 2010UC are expected to pass by Earth, with 2010UC possibly even getting as close as 4 million kilometers (approximately 2.48 million miles) from the planet’s surface.

The largest of the three, 2020RZ3, is taller than the Leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, with a diameter of 203 feet. If you’re living in California, this NEA is about four times as tall as the Hollywood sign on Santa Monica Mountains.

Read More
Read More

Decent living for all does not have to cost the Earth — ScienceDaily

Global energy consumption in 2050 could be reduced to the levels of the 1960s and still provide a decent standard of living for a population three times larger, according to a new study.

The study led by the University of Leeds has estimated the energy resource needed for everyone to be provided decent living standards in 2050 — meaning all their basic human needs such as shelter, mobility, food and hygiene are met, while also having access to modern, high quality healthcare, education and information technology.

The findings, published in in the journal Global Environmental Change, reveal that decent living standards could be provided to the entire global population of 10 billion that is expected to be reached by 2050, for less than 40% of today’s global energy. This is roughly 25% of that forecast by the International Energy Agency if current trends continue.

This level of global energy

Read More
Read More

Elon Musk says humans must leave Earth “because sun will engulf our planet”

Elon Musk has said that humans have to become a "multi-planet species". (Getty)
Elon Musk has said that humans have to become a “multi-planet species”. (Getty)

When Elon Musk launched a Tesla into space, it carried a sign saying “Don’t panic” on the dashboard – but the billionaire was in a more doom-laden form this week.

The SpaceX and Tesla pioneer warned, in an interview with The New York Times podcast Sway, that travel to other planets was necessary as Earth would be engulfed by the Sun.

Speaking to host Kara Swisher, Musk said: “I think this is fundamentally important for ensuring the long-term survival of life as we know it, to be a multi-planet species.

“Eventually the Sun is going to expand and engulf Earth. It will expand and incinerate Earth. It is for sure going to happen – but not any time soon.”

Read More: Starlink, everything you need to know about the satellite network

This is something of an understatement,

Read More
Read More