New research database can help shape the most effective and efficient response to COVID-19

Researchers around the world can tap into a new inter-disciplinary online database of COVID-19 research – allowing them to search for new partners, resources and funding to boost the global battle against the virus.

Launched today, the international open-access database for ongoing research activity COVID CORPUS aims to encourage collaboration and reduce duplication between researchers across all academic disciplines working on Covid-19 research.

Through its easy-to-use interface, the database will allow researchers and funders around the globe to coordinate, collaborate and network to help shape the most effective and efficient response to COVID-19 and its many impacts.

University of Birmingham experts in Computer Science and Medicine worked with the Institute for Global Innovation to create the database, which includes all disciplines of research, including health-related, socio-economic, behavioural, educational, cultural, science and technology.

Fighting COVID-19 requires the academic community to share ideas

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The Secret to Effective Time Management? Smaller Time Blocks

Most entrepreneurs wish they were better at managing their time. There are only eight hours in a standard work day, but it feels like you have 20 hours worth of tasks to do every day.

There are many legitimate solutions to this dilemma. One of the most valuable strategies is learning to delegate effectively to reduce your total workload. You can also automate certain tasks so you no longer have to actively manage them.

But once you’ve used all these tactics, you’ll be left with only one real solution to optimize your productivity: time management. Only by better managing your time will you be able to accomplish the greatest number of tasks in a day.



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There are plenty of pieces of advice floating around about effective time management, but some

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New class of highly effective inhibitors protects against neurodegeneration — ScienceDaily

Neurobiologists at Heidelberg University have discovered how a special receptor at neuronal junctions that normally activates a protective genetic programme can lead to nerve cell death when located outside synapses. Their fundamental findings on neurodegenerative processes simultaneously led the researchers at the Interdisciplinary Center for Neurosciences (IZN) to a completely new principle for therapeutic agents. In their experiments on mouse models, they discovered a new class of highly effective inhibitors for protecting nerve cells. As Prof. Dr Hilmar Bading points out, this novel class of drugs opens up — for the first time — perspectives to combat currently untreatable diseases of the nervous system. The results of this research were published in Science.

The research by Prof. Bading and his team is focused on the so-called NMDA receptor. This receptor is an ion channel protein that is activated by a biochemical messenger: the neurotransmitter glutamate. It allows calcium to

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Regulatory Technology Strives for New Era of Effective Governance

Regtech, short for regulatory technology, is a category of software solutions that helps its business customers to manage and de-risk compliance with the regulatory obligations of their respective industries. By its nature, regtech seeks first to understand and then to simplify and manage the highly complex laws written to regulate industry. While the right seeks to free business to grow and the left seeks to protect citizens and consumers, a good regtech solution supports both sides with technology that ensures compliance with the law while minimizing the resources necessary to do so.

Consider regulatory control over the financial services industry as a prime example from modern history. Speculative investment soared during the roaring twenties while production waned and unemployment rose. Over the decade, the stock market became increasingly over-valued and consumers took on more and more debt as banks turned a blind eye to obvious risk and over-leveraged cash

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Study shows automatic enrollment, paired with option to opt-out, is highly effective at boosting parents’ participation — ScienceDaily

Researchers know that texting programs can greatly benefit young children’s literacy. Now new research shows that parents’ participation in such programs can be boosted exponentially with one simple tweak: automatic enrollment, combined with the ability to opt out.

The new research from the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy appears in the Journal of Child and Family Studies.

In recent years, mounting research evidence has shown texting to be an effective, low-cost, scalable approach for engaging parents in their children’s learning. Some studies suggest text message interventions via tips for parents on how to support their child’s development can put young children’s learning 2-3 months ahead.

Yet getting parents to enroll in these beneficial programs can be challenging. With that in mind, researchers designed a study to test strategies for increasing program participation.

In the study, researchers from Duke, New York

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Genetic testing cost effective for newly diagnosed GIST — ScienceDaily

Because gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are sensitive to the targeted small molecule therapy imatinib, oncologists tend to treat all patients with metastatic GIST with this drug. However, because this rare type of cancer is caused by different genetic mutations, imatinib does not help all patients equally.

To determine whose cancer may be most responsive, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network suggests that patients undergo genetic testing to identify each individuals’ tumor mutations. And yet, only 30 percent of patients have genetic testing at the time of diagnosis, likely due to concerns over cost and utility of testing, said Jason Sicklick, MD, professor of surgery in the Division of Surgical Oncology at University of California San Diego School of Medicine.

“We recommend that all patients with a new diagnosis of metastatic GIST undergo genetic testing prior to the initiation of first-line chemotherapy,” said Sicklick, surgical oncologist and co-leader of the Sarcoma Disease

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Here’s The Most Effective Flirting Expression According To Science, Study Finds

KEY POINTS

  • Researchers outline three elements of most effective flirtatious look
  • Study concludes that flirting has the same weight as other widely-studied emotions
  • Result of the study could contribute to today’s debate on consent

By using the Facial Action Coding System (FACS), a team of researchers from the University of Kansas (KU) was able to identify the specific flirtatious look from women that proved to be the most effective cues for men. 

In the study published in the Journal of Sex Research, the team determined three elements that made the most obvious flirting cues for men to tell that the females are interested in them. These three elements are —

  • Head turned to one side and tilted down slightly
  • A slight smile
  • Eyes turned forward toward the implied target

To conduct the study, the researchers asked women volunteers to show them their most flirtatious look when conveying their romantic or

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These molecular insights may foster effective therapies using existing drugs for patients with COVID-19 — ScienceDaily

Viral and bacterial pathogens wield pathogenic or virulent proteins that interact with high-value targets inside human cells, attacking what is known as the host interactome. The host interactome is the network map of all the protein-protein interactions inside cells.

Such networks have been studied in organisms as diverse as plants, humans and roundworms, and they show a similarity to social networks like Facebook or airline route maps. In Facebook, a few people will have a huge number of friend connections, some will have many, and a vast majority will have much fewer. Similarly, airlines have a few hubs that many passengers pass through on the way to their destinations.

Host interactomes show a limited number of high-powered hubs — where a protein has a large number of connections — and a limited number of important bottlenecks, which are sites with a large number of short paths to a node. These

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Children’s immune response more effective against COVID-19 — ScienceDaily

Children and adults exhibit distinct immune system responses to infection by the virus that causes COVID-19, a finding that helps explain why COVID-19 outcomes tend to be much worse in adults, researchers from Yale and Albert Einstein College of Medicine report Sept. 18 in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

A widespread and dangerous immune response to the virus has been linked to acute respiratory distress syndrome, the need for ventilation, and increased mortality in adults with COVID-19. These outcomes are less common in children, which has led to speculation that immune system response to the virus is somehow suppressed. But the new study, which examined serum and cell samples obtained from pediatric and adult patients diagnosed with COVID-19, found that children actually express higher levels of two specific immune system molecules. The researchers believe this may contribute to the better outcomes.

“To our surprise, we found these particular serum

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