At White House’s urging, Republicans launch anti-tech blitz ahead of election

Senate Judiciary Chair Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), meanwhile, is holding a markup of new legislation on Thursday aimed at addressing allegations of an anti-conservative bias on social media. It’s the fastest any bill to revamp the legal shield has moved from introduction to a markup on Capitol Hill in recent memory.

Both committees are targeting liability protections that have been credited with fueling Silicon Valley’s success. The provision — enshrined in a 1996 law known as Section 230 — has allowed online businesses to grow without fear of lawsuits over user posts or their decisions to remove or otherwise moderate users’ content.

Both lawmakers have reason to want to get in the White House’s good graces. Graham, a prominent Trump ally, is facing the fight of his political life to hold onto his South Carolina seat against Democratic challenger Jaime Harrison. And Wicker will want to maintain a firm hold on

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U.S. election volatility an opportunity to buy emerging markets: Eastspring

(Reuters) – Broad weakness in emerging stocks and volatility stemming from U.S. election uncertainty have created value opportunities in developing markets, a client portfolio manager at fund house Eastspring Investments said.

FILE PHOTO: Currency dealers walk past an electronic board showing the Korea Composite Stock Price Index (KOSPI) at a dealing room of a bank in Seoul, South Korea, March 13, 2020. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

Samuel Bentley told the Reuters Global Markets Forum on Tuesday his fund was considering increasing exposure to South Korea, Mexico and South Africa.

“U.S. elections are typically a volatile time for emerging markets, and so we expect some good opportunities to top up this year,” said Bentley, whose firm prefers to assess political impact on company earnings over hedging event-risk.

(Graphic: Emerging markets in 2020, Country indices – )

Bentley expects U.S.-China relations to improve after the Nov. 3 election, which

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NYT editorial board presses for plan if Trump tweets he won election

The editorial board of The New York Times is imploring the world’s leading social media and technology companies to prepare themselves for a scenario in which President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew Biden campaign ad jabs at Trump’s reported 0 income tax payments Ocasio-Cortez: Trump contributed less in taxes ‘than waitresses and undocumented immigrants’ Third judge orders Postal Service to halt delivery cuts MORE claims victory on election night before he has been officially declared the winner. 

“Imagine: It’s midnight, and the electoral map looks quite red. But news networks and election officials aren’t calling the swing states, as this year’s record numbers of mail-in and absentee ballots have yet to be fully counted,” the Times wrote in an editorial published Sunday.

“Mr. Trump, leading in the popular vote, decides he’s seen enough. He takes to his social media platforms and declares that he has won re-election and will accept no

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Opinion | Social Media Needs an Election Declaration of Conscience

Such a united front wouldn’t just be symbolic. “If you had the platforms together making a statement of their values, then when they take action, it creates a permission structure for reticent platform executives to make difficult decisions quickly,” David Kaye, former United Nations special rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression, told the editorial board. Such a move would also be a strong public signal of the gravity of the moment.

There’s precedent for this type of collaboration. In 2016, Facebook, Twitter, Google and Microsoft came together to combat extremist content. The companies created a shared database using unique digital fingerprints to flag videos, pictures and memes promoting terrorist activity and ideologies. Domestic political disinformation poses different challenges than terrorist threats, but both are urgent matters of national security.

A public, transparent effort from the platforms would offer additional accountability for those spreading disinformation in the weeks and months

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Google will block election ads after polls close on Nov. 3

Google will block election ads after polls close on Election Day.


James Martin/CNET

This story is part of Elections 2020, CNET’s coverage of the run-up to voting in November.

Google plans to broadly block ads related to the US election after polls close on Nov. 3, the tech giant confirmed to CNET. Google sent an email to advertisers on Friday saying it will implement its sensitive event policy for political ads in order to avoid confusion, according to Axios, which obtained a copy of the email.

Google said in the email that its taking this step due to “an unprecedented amount of votes will be counted after Election Day this year,” according to Axios. The policy will block ads referencing candidates, the election, or the election results. It will also apply more broadly to ads that reference federal or state elections and ads that are targeting election-related search queries

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Facebook content oversight board to launch before election: What you need to know

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies in October 2019.


Getty Images

After nearly two years, Facebook’s much-anticipated content oversight board has committed to an October launch, just ahead of a heated US presidential election that’ll likely play out on social media. 

The board will have the power to uphold or overturn decisions made by Facebook to pull posts that the social network says violates its rules. It could also review posts that Facebook leaves up but that might violate Facebook’s standards. Dubbed Facebook’s supreme court, the board will have 20 members, including former judges, lawyers and journalists. Its responsibility extends to Instagram, Facebook’s photo-sharing service.

Getting to launch has been a time-consuming process. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg first publicly suggested the concept in November 2018. Members were named a

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Facebook critics form oversight board ahead of 2020 election

Some of Facebook’s most vocal critics are tired of waiting for its independent oversight board — so they’re starting their own.



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© Provided by NBC News


A group of about 25 experts from academia, civil rights, politics and journalism announced Friday that they have formed a group to analyze and critique Facebook’s content moderation decisions, policies and other platform issues in the run-up to the presidential election and beyond.

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The group, which calls itself the Real Facebook Oversight Board, plans to hold its first meeting via Facebook Live on Oct. 1. It will be hosted by Recode founder Kara Swisher, a New York Times contributing opinion writer.

Facebook is still working on creating its own oversight board, first described in April 2018 by CEO Mark Zuckerberg as an independent “Supreme Court” for content moderation decisions. Facebook’s board won’t launch in time to make any decisions during the presidential

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Facebook prepares for a potentially ‘chaotic’ election aftermath

Clegg didn’t offer specifics on the plans, or what might trigger these “break-glass options.” But he suggested that the company might consider “pretty exceptional measures to significantly restrict the circulation of content on our platform.” He pointed out the company has taken such steps in other countries in the past, including Sri Lanka and Myanmar (where Facebook’s early inaction against hate speech has been credited with inflaming tensions that resulted in genocide). 

Separately, another source told the paper that the social network is considering “about 70” scenarios, and that it’s working with “world-class military scenario planners.” Clegg, Sheryl Sandberg and Mark Zuckerberg would be among the executives deciding when to put these plans in motion. 

Facebook has been repeatedly criticized for not acting quickly enough to fight disinformation on its platform. The company has been battling a wave of rumors and misinformation about the coronavirus pandemic, which is expected to

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House Science Bills on Space Weather and Election Technology Pass the House

House Science Bills on Space Weather and Election Technology Pass the House

Press Release
From: House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020

House Science, Space, and Technology Committee Ranking Member Frank Lucas praised the passage of two bipartisan Committee bills today on space weather and election technology. 

S.881, the Promoting Research and Observations of Space Weather to Improve the Forecasting of Tomorrow Act, more commonly referred to as the PROSWIFT Act, improves our ability to monitor and forecast space weather. Space weather is generated by magnetic activity on the Sun and can affect technologies on Earth ranging from cell phone communications to GPS navigation to the electric grid. The bill includes an amendment by Lucas to create a pilot program that will ensure that emerging private sector companies have a seat at the table and will be able to provide monitoring and forecast data which
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As Trump holds back, tech firms step in on election security

WASHINGTON — Adam Schiff was in the audience at the 2018 Aspen Security Forum when a Microsoft executive mentioned an attempted hacking of three politicians up for reelection. It was the first that Schiff, then the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, had ever heard of it.

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