How An Adobe Employee Made Every Device In The World More Queer (With Just Emojis)

One Adobe employee, with an expertise in fonts, is behind the victory of making perhaps the most universal language in the world–emojis–more gender-inclusive.

Paul D. Hunt is the designer and creator behind the latest gender-inclusive emojis, that are now on nearly every device all over the world.

They are part of the newest set of emojis ‘Unicode 13’ a set of standards released earlier this year by the Unicode Consortium, an organization that sets rules for tech companies using special characters like emoji. 

Hunt is a typeface designer and font developer at Adobe. Still, motivated by personal reasons to make all emoji, more gender-inclusive, they submitted plans to the Unicode Consortium.

“I decided to champion the case for gender-inclusive emoji because, as a queer

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Ex-Amazon employee arrested after issuing fake refunds totaling more than $96K

Amazon’s Seattle HQ. (GeekWire Photo / Kevin Lisota)

A former Amazon employee was charged with federal wire fraud and aggravated identity theft after issuing false refunds for products ordered on Amazon.com.

A criminal complaint filed by the FBI alleges that Vu Anh Nguyen issued more than $96,000 in fraudulent refunds to himself and associates while working as a selling support associate based in Tempe, Ariz.

Nguyen used his employee access and manipulated Amazon’s product return procedures by manually authorizing refunds for items ordered from third-party sellers, according to the complaint. None of the refended items were actually returned to Amazon.

Amazon fired Nguyen after detecting the suspicious refunds and reported Nguyen to authorities in July.

“We thank the Department of Justice and Federal Bureau of Investigation for their swift work to hold this fraudster accountable,” Amazon said in a statement. “There is no place for misconduct or fraud at Amazon.

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Coinbase head draws scorn and praise for anti employee activism post

  • Coinbase CEO Brian Armstrong wrote in a blog post over the weekend that corporate activism was a “distraction” from his company’s mission of increasing global access to cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin.
  • Mentioning charged topics like the police killing of Breonna Taylor and the upcoming presidential election, Armstrong implied that employees who wanted their company to be focused on social issues should find work elsewhere.
  • Some in the startup and venture capital world were outraged, pointing out that Armstrong tweeted “Black Lives Matter” in June.
  • Others cheered Armstrong, like investor Paul Graham.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The CEO of cryptocurrency broker Coinbase Brian Armstrong stirred outrage and praise from Silicon Valley over the weekend by coming out with a hard line against employee activism at work in a Medium post Sunday.

Mentioning hot-button issues like the police shooting of Breonna Taylor and the upcoming U.S. election, Armstrong said he

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Google’s Sundar Pichai says future of office is employee ‘on-sites’

  • Google CEO Sundar Pichai said the company is “reconfiguring” its offices amid a more permanent shift to working from home. 
  • Pichai discussed the future of work at Google during an interview for Time 100 this week. 
  • While he doesn’t see working in the office going away altogether, he described the office as a space for “on-sites” — presumably, days where employees, who mostly work from home, gather in the office. 
  • Pichai also said he made the decision to have employees work from home until next summer in order to boost productivity and give workers a sense of certainty during an uncertain time.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Google’s famous offices may look a bit different for employees once it’s safe for them to begin returning to work. 

Google CEO Sundar Pichai said this week that the company is making changes to its physical spaces to better support employees

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US gig worker rule proposed, narrowing employee definition

The issue of which workers in our economy have rights to many benefits and protections — like employer health insurance or unemployment benefits — has become critical during the pandemic. And it often comes down to how that worker is classified: as an employee or an independent contractor.

This week the Labor Department proposed a new rule that would make it easier for companies to designate workers, including gig workers, as independent contractors who are ineligible for many protections.

The move comes in response to several state laws, like California’s AB5, which have made it harder to classify workers as independent contractors.

In California, the debate has mostly centered on gig workers, like drivers for ride-hailing services. Most of them would be reclassified as employees under state law. 

But the new federal rule could set up competing legal criteria for how worker classification should be decided. And that could cause

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As Google rethinks the remote work, it will need new employee perks

  • An employee survey revealed that just 8% of Googlers want to return to the office full time after the pandemic.
  • Meanwhile, CEO Sundar Pichai says the company is thinking about a more ‘flexible’ approach to office work.
  • As Googlers continue to work from home, the company will need to find new ways to attract talent from competitors. This week, we saw it employ one smart tactic: helping employees pay back student loans.
  • Are you a Google insider with insight to share? You can contact this reporter securely using the encrypted messaging app Signal (+1-628-228-1836) or encrypted email ([email protected]) on a nonwork device.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Google employees will almost certainly be stuck working from home until next summer at the very least, but what happens then?

This week, Google published the results of a survey which asked its employees how they felt about eventually returning to

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Using Technology To Support Employee Mental Health

Guest post by Martha Neary, Project Manager of One Mind PsyberGuide.

With at least 45 million American adults living with a mental health illness, and many experiencing increasing levels of stress, employers are seeking ways to provide much needed resources and support to their employees. In the world of COVID-19, where additional and unique barriers to care exist such as physical distancing measures that limit contact with providers and the balancing of new work at school schedules from home, many employers are looking to digital resources to support their workplaces and employee wellbeing. Headspace, for example, noted a 500% increase in requests from companies seeking support for their employees’ mental health since March.

Yet there is an overwhelming number of mental health technologies available, and choosing one requires an understanding of the complex landscape. Over 15,000 mental health apps are available on the app stores. Even within the category of

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