Studying the sun as a star to understand stellar flares and exoplanets — ScienceDaily

New research shows that sunspots and other active regions can change the overall solar emissions. The sunspots cause some emissions to dim and others to brighten; the timing of the changes also varies between different types of emissions. This knowledge will help astronomers characterize the conditions of stars, which has important implications for finding exoplanets around those stars.

An international research team led by Shin Toriumi at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency added up the different types of emissions observed by a fleet of satellites including “Hinode” and the “Solar Dynamics Observatory” to see what the Sun would look like if observed from far away as a single dot of light like other stars.

The team investigated how features like sunspots change the overall picture. They found that when a sunspot is near the middle of the side of the Sun facing us, it causes the total amount of visible

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NASA satellite’s dazzling panorama hides 74 exoplanets (and potentially hundreds more)

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This panorama of the northern sky is composed of 208 images taken by TESS in the second year of its mission.


NASA/MIT/TESS and Ethan Kruse (USRA)

A series of 208 images captured by NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) over one year reveal a dazzling sea of stars and 74 exoplanets in the northern sky, the space agency said in a release Monday. TESS has now imaged around 75% of the sky over two years. The planet-hunter wrapped up its second year of science operations in July. 

Astronomers are looking through another 1,200 exoplanet candidates to confirm whether new worlds exist there. More than half of those candidates are in the northern sky, NASA says.

TESS pinpoints planets by monitoring several stars simultaneously over large chunks of the sky and keeping watch for any

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A Distant Blue Star Hosts One of the Most Extreme Exoplanets Known to Science

The newly deployed CHEOPS space telescope has completed its first observations of an exoplanet, uncovering some fascinating new details about an ultra-hot Jupiter known as WASP-189b.



Artistic impression of exoplanet WASP-189b orbiting its host star, which glows in blue.


© Image: ESA
Artistic impression of exoplanet WASP-189b orbiting its host star, which glows in blue.

Hot Jupiters are Jupiter-like exoplanets located in close proximity to their host stars, hence their name. Ultra-hot Jupiters are basically the same thing, but, as you’ve probably guessed, they’re even hotter. Back in 2018, astronomers using the ground-based WASP-South telescope in South Africa detected an ultra-hot Jupiter dubbed WASP-189b, unlike anything seen before.

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Two years later, using the brand-spanking-new Characterising Exoplanet Satellite (CHEOPS) space telescope, astronomers have gazed upon this celestial wonder with new eyes, refining what we know of this unusual exoplanet, while at the same time affirming the tremendous potential of this European space telescope, which only began making scientific observations this past April.

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