Scientists find evidence of exotic state of matter in candidate material for quantum computers

Scientists find evidence of exotic state of matter in candidate material for quantum computers
An illustration of the crystal structure of ruthenium trichloride showing the simple honeycomb lattice of ruthenium ions and chlorine ions. The twisted octahedra formed by chlorine around the electron spin of each ruthenium atom are mirror images of each other. This twist is key to the compound’s unusual behavior, which is evidence that it may contain an example of a quantum spin liquid. Credit: Courtesy of Arkady Shekhter/ National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

Using a novel technique, scientists working at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory have found evidence for a quantum spin liquid, a state of matter that is promising as a building block for the quantum computers of tomorrow.


Researchers discovered the exciting behavior while studying the so-called electron spins in the compound ruthenium trichloride. Their findings, published today in the journal Nature Physics , show that electron spins interact across the material, effectively lowering

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