T-Mobile is expanding its rural home internet service to 450 more areas

tmobile-logo-phone-american-flag-4219

T-Mobile is bringing its LTE home internet service to more people.


Angela Lang/CNET

T-Mobile has announced an expansion of its Home Internet pilot to 450 more areas, which it says covers 20 million households. The service uses T-Mobile’s 4G LTE network, and was launched as an invite-only pilot in rural areas in March last year, with the carrier saying it’s now opening the service to non-T-Mobile customers.

T-Mobile’s home internet service is $50 per month, with a $0 hardware lease and no data caps.  

“We’re understanding this massive expansion … at a time when our connection to the Internet is so vital — for work, remote school, connection with family and friends,” said T-Mobile CEO Mike Sievert.

You can see a list of the new cities

Read More
Read More

Working together to secure our expanding connected health future

Securing medical devices is not a new challenge. Former Vice President Cheney, for example, had the wireless capabilities of a defibrillator disabled when implanted near his heart in 2007, and hospital IT departments and health providers have for years secured medical devices to protect patient data and meet HIPAA requirements.

connected health

With the expansion of security perimeters, the surge in telehealth usage (particularly during COVID-19), and proliferation in the number and types of connected technologies, healthcare cybersecurity has evolved into a more complex and urgent effort.

Today, larger hospital systems have approximately 350,000+ medical devices running simultaneously. On top of this, millions of additional connected devices are maintained by the patients themselves. Over the next 10 years, it’s estimated the number of connected medical devices could increase to roughly 50 billion, driven by innovations such as 5G, edge computing, and more. This rise in connectivity has increased the threat of cyberattacks

Read More
Read More

Dublin tech conference UXDX expanding overseas

UXDX, a technology conference that began life in Dublin, is following in the footsteps of other locally founded events such as Web Summit and SaaStock by expanding overseas.

Irish-owned UXDX, which has held five conferences in Dublin since 2016, is holding its first Asia-Pacific (APAC)-focused event next March. Due to Covid restrictions the inaugural conference will be held virtually but founders Rory and Catherine Martin are aiming to have an in-person event in Sydney the following year.

The founders said they have seen companies in APAC struggling with digital transformation and believe their event will help such organisations as they make the shift from delivering projects to working as cross-functional teams that build products.

Among the speakers lined up to deliver keynotes at the inaugural APAC event are senior representatives from Ebay, Westpac and Grab.

UXDX stands for User Experience (UX), Experience Design (XD), and Developer Experience (DX).

The original

Read More
Read More

Energy Companies, Others Use Expanding Range Of Tools To Detect, Control Methane

As energy companies strive to get their emissions of methane under control, they’re being joined in the fight by a loose coalition of academic institutions and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) employing a suite of tools that combine technological innovations, such as drones and satellite-based detection equipment, with advanced data analysis.

While past efforts to regulate the emissions of the potent greenhouse gas have focused on identifying the smaller leaks spewing from equipment at oil and gas operations sites, advanced methane-detection equipment, carried aloft by airplanes and satellites, is giving researchers as well as oil and gas operators the ability to track large plumes of methane across vast geographic areas.

In the meantime, the development of sophisticated continuous monitoring equipment, and the resultant decrease in cost of that equipment, is giving operators the ability to survey the air quality across entire oil fields, pinpointing the locations of any leaks that do occur.

Read More
Read More

South Korea tech giants expanding robotics amid COVID-19

Sept. 23 (UPI) — South Korea’s biggest tech companies are investing in robotics as a solution to the risks of human contact amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Service robots could soon reduce the number of jobs in restaurants and hotels, however.

LG Electronics is expanding its robot business and introducing new technology in hotels that eliminates the need for human servers, South Korean news service EDaily reported Wednesday.

The company will soon introduce a robot that pours draft beer for guests at the Mayfield Hotel buffet in Seoul, according to the report.

Robots could replace workers in other areas of the hotel, including people who work in outdoor delivery, food and beverage, and even concierge services.

LG Electronics, part of the fourth-biggest conglomerate in South Korea, LG Corp., is positioned to install robots in a variety of locations, including in apartment complexes, on university campuses and playgrounds. An LG affiliate is

Read More
Read More