AP Explains: the Promise of 5G Wireless – Speed, Hype, Risk | Business News

By MAE ANDERSON and TALI ARBEL, Associated Press

A much-hyped network upgrade called “5G” means different things to different people.

To industry proponents, it’s the next huge innovation in wireless internet. To the U.S. government, it’s the backbone technology of a future that America will wrestle with China to control. To many average people, it’s simply a mystery.

What, exactly, is 5G wireless — and will you even notice when it comes online?

5G is a new technical standard for wireless networks — the fifth, naturally — that promises faster speeds; less lag, or “latency,” when connecting to the network; and the ability to connect many devices to the internet without bogging it down. 5G networks will ideally be better able to handle more users, lots of sensors and heavy traffic.

Before we can all use it, wireless companies and phone makers have to upgrade. Phones need new chips and

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Instagram head Adam Mosseri explains top ways influencers make money

  • On October 6, Instagram hosted a virtual conference to celebrate the app’s 10th anniversary and discuss new features, trends, and usage tips.
  • Adam Mosseri, the head of Instagram, outlined the six main ways that creators make money through Instagram, including brand partnerships, affiliate marketing, and ad revenue.
  • He also touched on how Instagram wants to improve monetization moving forward.
  • Subscribe to Business Insider’s influencer newsletter: Insider Influencers.

Instagram hosted on Tuesday a digital convention to mark the app’s 10th anniversary and look forward to what’s next.

The event was held on Zoom and kicked off with a conversation between Adam Mosseri, the head of Instagram, and content creator Lilly Singh. After the two shared questions and talking points about some of Instagram’s newest features, trends, and areas for improvement (like fake engagement and cyber-bullying), the audience asked Mosseri questions. 

“Do you plan on sharing ad revenue or any other revenue

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Seismic data explains continental collision beneath Tibet — ScienceDaily

In addition to being the last horizon for adventurers and spiritual seekers, the Himalaya region is a prime location for understanding geological processes. It hosts world-class mineral deposits of copper, lead, zinc, gold and silver, as well as rarer elements like lithium, antimony and chrome, that are essential to modern technology. The uplift of the Tibetan plateau even affects global climate by influencing atmospheric circulation and the development of seasonal monsoons.

Yet despite its importance, scientists still don’t fully understand the geological processes contributing to the region’s formation. “The physical and political inaccessibility of Tibet has limited scientific study, so most field experiments have either been too localized to understand the big picture or they’ve lacked sufficient resolution at depths to properly understand the processes,” said Simon Klemperer, a geophysics professor at Stanford’s School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences (Stanford Earth).

Now, new seismic data gathered by Klemperer and

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Nvidia Further Explains Botched RTX 3080 Launch, Citing “Unprecedented Demand”

The pre-order launch of Nvidia’s much-anticipated RTX 3080 was an unmitigated disaster, and many would-be customers have yet to get their hands on a confirmed order. Yesterday, Nvidia posted a more detailed explanation on its website, citing a heretofore unseen level of traffic and answering a few of the questions that frustrated fans have been asking on sites like Reddit.

In the statement, Nvidia generally blames the “truly unprecedented” level of demand for the RTX 30-series as the source of the trouble, saying that it and its partners underestimated it. The manufacturer notes that the traffic to retailers exceeded Black Friday numbers, illustrating just how many people wanted to buy the card. Nvidia notes that it began shipping GPUs to retailers in August, and that such shortages are relatively common when it comes to the launch of high-end graphics cards.

Later in the statement, Nvidia blames a wave of “malicious

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