Nasa captures an exploding supernova on camera

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Take a look at this brilliant video from Nasa which shows the star exploding!

Nasa has captured an exploding supernova on camera.

The supernova called SN 2018gv is located around 70 million light-years away from Earth, in the spiral galaxy NGC 2525.

A supernova is a pretty spectacular cosmic event, which happens when a star reaches the end of its life cycle and collapses in on itself.

This causes an incredibly powerful explosion which can send shockwaves across the galaxy, and can even create black holes.

According to Nasa, supernova SN 2018gv unleashed a surge of energy that was five billion suns brighter than our Sun. That’s pretty bright!

The scientists were able to record the exploding star using the Hubble Space Telescope.

galaxy.NASA/ESA/ESA/A. Riess/SH0ES Team

Supernova SN 2018gv can be seen here

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NASA’s Hubble Telescope saw a gigantic, exploding star disappear into the void

Hubble observed a supernova on the outer edge of spiral galaxy NGC 2525. 


NASA, ESA, and A. Riess (STScI/JHU) and the SH0ES team Acknowledgment: M. Zamani (ESA/Hubble)

Titanic, runaway thermonuclear explosion. A disappearing act. Nature’s atomic bomb. NASA sure knows how to describe a supernova, the final moments of a star’s existence.

Seventy-million light-years away in the scenic spiral galaxy NGC 2525, a white dwarf exploded and the Hubble Space Telescope witnessed its last days. NASA and the European Space Agency, which jointly run Hubble, released a rare time-lapse of the supernova’s fading brightness. 

The space telescope first started watching the supernova, named SN 2018gv, in February 2018. The time-lapse covers almost a year of Hubble observations.

The supernova initially outshone the other stars in its host galaxy. “When a star unleashes as much energy

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NASA’s Hubble Telescope sees huge exploding star disappear into the void

Titanic, runaway thermonuclear explosion. A disappearing act. Nature’s atomic bomb. NASA sure knows how to describe a supernova, the final moments of a star’s existence.



a star filled sky: Hubble observed a supernova on the outer edge of spiral galaxy NGC 2525. NASA, ESA, and A. Riess (STScI/JHU) and the SH0ES team Acknowledgment: M. Zamani (ESA/Hubble)


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Hubble observed a supernova on the outer edge of spiral galaxy NGC 2525. NASA, ESA, and A. Riess (STScI/JHU) and the SH0ES team Acknowledgment: M. Zamani (ESA/Hubble)

Seventy-million light-years away in the scenic spiral galaxy NGC 2525, a white dwarf exploded and the Hubble Space Telescope witnessed its last days. NASA and the European Space Agency, which jointly run Hubble, released a rare time-lapse of the supernova’s fading brightness. 

The space telescope first started watching the supernova, named SN 2018gv, in February 2018. The time-lapse covers almost a year of Hubble observations.

The supernova initially outshone the other stars in its host galaxy. “When a star unleashes as much energy in a matter of days as our sun does in several

Read More
Read More