Exclusive: TikTok Rival Triller Explores Deal to Go Public – Sources | Top News

By Joshua Franklin and Echo Wang

(Reuters) – Triller Inc, a budding competitor to popular short-video app TikTok, is in discussions with blank-check acquisition companies about a merger which would take the U.S. social media company public, according to people familiar with the matter.

The deal would come as Triller seeks to capitalize on TikTok’s woes. U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration has ordered TikTok’s Chinese parent ByteDance to divest the app, citing concerns that the data of U.S. citizens could be accessible to China’s Communist Party government. TikTok has sued the U.S. government to stave off a ban from U.S. app stores while deal negotiations continue.

Triller, which was launched in 2015 and only has a fraction of the 100 million users that TikTok boasts in the United States, has said it hopes that the uncertainty over its rival’s future will drive more influencers and users to its platform.

Triller

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From early astronomy to Star Trek, Baltimore museum explores the celestial fascination of Jewish scholars, artists

During the early years of the first “Star Trek” TV series, when a producer asked actor Leonard Nimoy to develop a sign of greeting for his character Spock to use, Nimoy flashed on a childhood memory.

What popped into his mind was a synagogue service in which several rabbis raised their hands, split their pinkie and ring fingers from their middle and index fingers to form a wide V, and started chanting in Hebrew.

And that’s how the Birkat Kohanim — a sign of Jewish blessing that dates to the time of Moses — inspired the “Vulcan salute,” the hand sign that became Spock’s signature and an icon of Western pop culture.

The story, first shared by Nimoy in his 1975 autobiography, “I Am Not Spock,” isn’t the only example of Judaism intersecting the universes of space study and science fiction. It’s a connection as old as the Torah, and

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Team of materials researchers explores new domains of the compositionally complex metals — ScienceDaily

The most significant advances in human civilization are marked by the progression of the materials that humans use. The Stone Age gave way to the Bronze Age, which in turn gave way to the Iron Age. New materials disrupt the technologies of the time, improving life and the human condition.

Modern technologies can likewise be directly traced to innovations in the materials used to make them, as exemplified by the use of silicon in computer chips and state-of-the-art steels that underpin infrastructure. For centuries, however, materials and alloy design have relied on the use of a base, or principal, element, to which small fractions of other elements are added. Take steel, for instance, in which tiny amounts of carbon added to the principal element iron (Fe), lead to improved properties. When small amounts of other elements are added, the steel can be tailored for, say, enhanced corrosion resistance or improved

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New exhibit explores the science and technology behind assistive devices

KITCHENER — From prosthetic arms and legs to gadgets that can help you feel music, a new exhibit explores how science and technology can improve lives.

Human Plus: Real Lives + Engineering opens its doors at the Ken Seiling Waterloo Region Museum on Friday, and hopes to get people thinking about how to create assistive devices that can help people.

“Universal design that is human centred is good design for everybody,” said James Jensen, supervisor of collections and exhibits at Ken Seiling Waterloo Region Museum.

“This exhibit is looking at how technology, both high-tech and low-tech, can be adapted to different circumstances. It’s a story I think we can all relate to.”

The exhibit was created by the New York Hall of Science in partnership with the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry. It features several interactive displays that highlight a variety of engineering feats that push the boundaries of

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