Five Eyes governments, India, and Japan make new call for encryption backdoors

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Five Eyes cyber panel at CYBERUK 19


Image: ZDNet/CBSi

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Cyberwar and the Future of Cybersecurity

Today’s security threats have expanded in scope and seriousness. There can now be millions — or even billions — of dollars at risk when information security isn’t handled properly.

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Members of the intelligence-sharing alliance Five Eyes, along with government representatives for Japan and India, have published a statement over the weekend calling on tech companies to come up with a solution for law enforcement to access end-to-end encrypted communications.

The statement is the alliance’s latest effort to get tech companies to agree to encryption backdoors.

The Five Eyes alliance, comprised of the US, the UK, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, have made similar calls to tech giants in 2018 and 2019, respectively.

Just like before, government officials claim tech companies have put themselves in a corner by incorporating end-to-end encryption (E2EE)

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Will This Be the Last French Open With Only Human Eyes Minding the Lines?

“It is not a 3-D re-creation; we give the real image,” Simon said. “We see the surface of the court how it is, even if it has moved or just moved.”

This year, the U.S. Open became the first Grand Slam event to use almost exclusively electronic line calling, eliminating line umpires on all but two of its courts. Initial feedback was positive, according to Stacey Allaster, the tournament director, but the U.S. Open has yet to commit to using the same system in 2021.

Electronic line judging would most likely eliminate one current issue: umpires examining the wrong ball mark on the clay, which is a frequent source of tension with players. But if there is a switch to electronic calls, players will still be able to see the mark on clay, and it will not always match what technology records.

“The ball mark can be larger or smaller

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The BlueSkySea B1M Motorcycle Camera System Keeps Two Digital Eyes On Your Ride

I got a couple of motorcycle video systems in for review this past summer, including the Thinkware M1 and this system, the Blueskysea B1M. Both get the job done in terms of recording activity around your motorcycle (or other types of vehicles), but there are some key differences.

At $159.99, the Blueskysea B1M is by far the less expensive of the two systems, but it still held up and performed well during a long test period, where it was installed on my scooter, a 2007 Yamaha Morphous 250. Similar to the Thinkware, it consists of two Sony-made 1080P HD cameras with 135 degree wide angle lenses that are tethered to a central hideable controller that records video to a micro SD card. There’s no screen with this system; videos are downloaded to your smartphone

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UK Eyes Innovative Launch Technology To Fuel Its Space Ambitions

KEY POINTS

  • The U.K. government invested $117,000 in the tech
  • Autophage rockets may be used for launching small satellites
  • The U.K. aims to secure 10% of the space industry by 2030

The U.K. government is investing in rockets that “eat themselves” up on the way to orbit as it scrambles to gain market share in the global space industry.

The ‘autophage’ rocket engine, developed by researchers from Ukraine and Glasgow University, Scotland, has received funding worth 90,000 pounds, or $117,000, from the Ministry of Defense’s innovation head-hunter Defense & Security Accelerator (DASA).

Autophage rockets, simply put, help to lift satellites into space by burning their own body as fuel. This tech produces enough energy to reach orbit in a smaller launch vehicle. It may help the U.K. claim a part of the global $2.8-billion small-satellite launch market, which at present is dominated by American companies Rocket Lab and SpaceX.

“The

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All Eyes on Apple’s Upcoming “Hi, Speed” Event

On Tuesday, Apple (AAPL) sent out invitations for an October 13 event named “Hi, Speed,” keeping the happening’s content under wraps. However, it is not hard to deduce from its name that Apple is alluding to the performance expected from its flagship product – the next gen iPhone 12, Apple’s first handset to boast 5G capabilities –  and will therefore announce the product’s launch at the event.

Reading between the lines, Deutsche Bank analyst Jeriel Ong arrives at the same conclusion. Although the analyst adds it “remains somewhat speculative when exactly iPhones will be available for sale after this event,” going by past announcements Ong assumes “a 10-day rule is appropriate.” This suggests the coveted product could hit the shelves on the weekend of 10/23-10/25 which will provide roughly 10 weeks of iPhone sales for the December quarter.

The tech giant usually reserves its new iPhone launch for

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First empirical study on how users pay visual attention to mobile app designs shows larger and brighter elements don’t catch our eyes after all — ScienceDaily

As part of an international collaboration, Aalto University researchers have shown that our common understanding of what attracts visual attention to screens, in fact, does not transfer to mobile applications. Despite the widespread use of mobile phones and tablets in our everyday lives, this is the first study to empirically test how users’ eyes follow commonly used mobile app elements.

Previous work on what attracts visual attention, or visual saliency, has centered on desktop and web-interfaces.

‘Apps appear differently on a phone than on a desktop computer or browser: they’re on a smaller screen which simply fits fewer elements and, instead of a horizontal view, mobile devices typically use a vertical layout. Until now it was unclear how these factors would affect how apps actually attract our eyes,’ explains Aalto University Professor Antti Oulasvirta.

In the study, the research team used a large set of representative mobile interfaces and eye

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Apple, Google, and Samsung are making the argument for a $1,000 smartphone tougher than ever. Now all eyes are on the iPhone 12.



a laptop computer sitting on top of a table: Apple's iPhone 11 lineup Hollis Johnson/Business Insider


© Hollis Johnson/Business Insider
Apple’s iPhone 11 lineup Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

  • Apple, Google, and Samsung have all launched new smartphones in recent months that offer high-end features at a much more affordable price.
  • The latest in this trend is Google’s Pixel 5, which was announced on Wednesday and costs $100 less than its predecessor, the Pixel 4, did at launch.
  • Samsung also just launched a cheaper version of the Galaxy S20 that comes with 5G, a large borderless screen, and a triple-lens camera.
  • Now, all eyes will be on Apple to see how it prices the iPhone 12 lineup in a market that’s already saturated with more affordable 5G phones.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

After years of sky-high prices, major smartphone makers are changing their ways — and Google’s new Pixel 5 is just the latest example.

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Google’s newly announced $700 Pixel 5 is the

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Gaming Giant Roblox Preparing To Go Public Early 2021, Eyes $8 Billion Valuation: Report

KEY POINTS

  • Roblox is currently valued at $4 billion
  • It raised $150 million in series G funding in February
  • Roblox has more than 100 million monthly active users 

Gaming platform Roblox is getting ready to go public on the U.S. stock market early next  year, a move which may double its current valuation of $4 billion, Reuters reported.

The gaming company is in talks with investment banks to gauge whether it should debut on the market through a conventional initial public offering (IPO) or a direct listing, the report quoted sources as saying on the condition of anonymity. The company declined to comment to Reuters.

In an IPO, shares are created, underwritten an sold to the public, while in a direct listing, outstanding shares are sold with no underwriters involved. This is a rare method, which does not dilute the ownership of existing stakeholders.

This week, software maker Asana (NYSE:

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Ford’s new CEO eyes software, tech stack as differentiator vs. rivals

New Ford CEO Jim Farley’s plan for the automaker includes a heavy dose of software and services for its commercial vehicle business as well as new consumer experiences to drive loyalty.

Ford, which is in the middle of a turnaround of its core business, is trying to navigate a shift to electric vehicles, autonomous vehicles as well as an industry that is increasingly more about software. Farley takes over for Jim Hackett, who streamlined the automaker over the last three years. 

Farley outlined a series of leadership changes and a plan that includes “expanding its commercial vehicle business with a suite of software services that drive loyalty and recurring revenue streams” and “unleashing technology and software in ways that set Ford apart from competitors.”

In addition, Ford is looking to develop connected vehicles and create new businesses from the Argo AI self-driving system.

Ford on Roadshow: Ford Bronco ordering

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US military eyes nuclear thermal rocket for missions in Earth-moon space

The U.S. military aims to get a nuclear thermal rocket up and running, to boost its ability to monitor the goings-on in Earth-moon space.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) just awarded a $14 million task order to Gryphon Technologies, a company in Washington, D.C., that provides engineering and technical solutions to national security organizations.

The money will support DARPA’s Demonstration Rocket for Agile Cislunar Operations (DRACO) program, whose main goal is to demonstrate a nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) system in Earth orbit. 

Related: Superfast spacecraft propulsion concepts (images)

NTP systems use fission reactors to heat propellants such as hydrogen to extreme temperatures, then eject the gas through nozzles to create thrust. This tech boasts a thrust-to-weight ratio about 10,000 times higher than that of electric propulsion systems and a specific impulse, or propellant efficiency, two to five times that of traditional chemical rockets, DARPA officials wrote in a

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