Apple Drops 30% Fee for Facebook Paid Live Events, Excludes Gamers

In an unusual move, Apple has agreed to not collect the App Store’s 30% “tax” on purchases made through Facebook’s app for live paid events — but only through the end of 2020. Moreover, Apple will still take a 30% cut of paid livestreams from video-game  creators using the paid-livestream feature.

The ongoing clash of tech titans is the latest in the public fight some app developers are waging against Apple over its App Store business practices, which they say are unfair.

Facebook complained that Apple agreed only to a short moratorium on collecting in-app fees for paid live events, which it launched last month. For its part, Facebook says it won’t take a cut of creators or businesses’ revenue for livestreaming events until at least August 2021, citing economic hardships inflicted by the COVD pandemic.

“Apple has agreed to provide a brief, three-month respite after which struggling businesses will

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Apple and Facebook spin antitrust claims: ‘We’re misunderstood’

In late July, a Congressional subcommittee successfully compelled four major tech company CEOs to formally answer questions over allegedly monopolistic business practices — a public spectacle marred only by COVID-19-related isolation of the attendees. Amazon, Facebook, and Google faced some of the heaviest questioning, but Apple certainly didn’t walk away untouched, as it was peppered with evidence that its App Store was abusing its increasingly dominant position within the software industry.

The “Online Platforms and Market Power” hearing matters because it paved the way for formal antitrust actions against four of the world’s largest companies, technology or otherwise. Individually and collectively, they reach billions of people, with an outsized impact on the hardware, software, and services enterprises and end users rely upon every day. While all four of the tech giants portray themselves as ambitious good actors, there are certainly negative consequences to their actions.

Today, a group of developers

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Facebook says fake accounts tied to Russia posed as journalists and promoted other websites

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Facebook announced Thursday that it took down three separate networks of fake accounts tied to Russia.


Graphic by Pixabay/Illustration by CNET

Facebook said Thursday it removed more than 340 accounts and pages and groups tied to Russia, some of which posed as journalists and tried to drive people to other websites and social media platforms. 

The social network said it pulled down three separate networks of Russian-linked accounts that targeted various countries worldwide but had a “very limited following.” Some of these accounts tried to pose as news outlets, dupe freelance journalists into writing articles and attempted to drive users to other websites. Facebook removed these accounts for violating its rules against misleading others about their identity and purpose on behalf of a foreign or government entity. 

Russian

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Facebook, Twitter, YouTube Ink Pact With Advertisers For ‘Common Definition’ on Hate Speech

San Francisco: After months of intensive talks with major advertisers, Facebook, YouTube and Twitter have agreed to adopt a common set of definitions for hate speech and other harmful content, the Global Alliance for Responsible Media (GARM) said on Wednesday. Also Read – No Coercive Action Against Facebook Chief in Delhi Riots Case Till Oct 15: Supreme Court to Delhi Assembly

GARM is a cross-industry initiative founded and led by the World Federation of Advertisers (WFA) and supported by other trade bodies, including ANA, ISBA and the 4A’s. Also Read – Gucci Unveils Jeans With Fake Grass Stains For Whopping Rs 88,000, Internet Left Baffled!

The move comes after over 200 brands including Starbucks and Levis recently pulled their advertising from Facebook and the #StopHateforProfit campaign gained momentum after celebrities, like Kim Kardashian West, froze their social media account for a day. Also Read – Soaring Popularity: Twitter Records 6.1

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Facebook says fake accounts from China aimed at US politics

Facebook said Tuesday it derailed a network of fakes accounts out of China that had recently taken aim at the US presidential race.

The takedown came as part of the social networks fight against “coordinated inauthentic behavior” and marked the first time Facebook had seen such a campaign based in China targeting US politics, according to head of security policy Nathaniel Gleicher.

Facebook did not connect the campaign to the Chinese government, saying its investigation found links to individuals in the Fujian province of China.

In the takedown, Facebook removed 155 accounts, 11 Pages, 9 Groups and 6 Instagram accounts for violating its policy against foreign interference in deceptive schemes.

The campaign out of China focused primarily on the Philippines and South East Asia more broadly, and just a bit on the US, according to Gleicher.

Posts particularly commented about naval activity in the South China Sea, including US Navy

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Facebook prepares for a potentially ‘chaotic’ election aftermath

Clegg didn’t offer specifics on the plans, or what might trigger these “break-glass options.” But he suggested that the company might consider “pretty exceptional measures to significantly restrict the circulation of content on our platform.” He pointed out the company has taken such steps in other countries in the past, including Sri Lanka and Myanmar (where Facebook’s early inaction against hate speech has been credited with inflaming tensions that resulted in genocide). 

Separately, another source told the paper that the social network is considering “about 70” scenarios, and that it’s working with “world-class military scenario planners.” Clegg, Sheryl Sandberg and Mark Zuckerberg would be among the executives deciding when to put these plans in motion. 

Facebook has been repeatedly criticized for not acting quickly enough to fight disinformation on its platform. The company has been battling a wave of rumors and misinformation about the coronavirus pandemic, which is expected to

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