Earphone tracks facial expressions, even with a face mask — ScienceDaily

Cornell University researchers have invented an earphone that can continuously track full facial expressions by observing the contour of the cheeks — and can then translate expressions into emojis or silent speech commands.

With the ear-mounted device, called C-Face, users could express emotions to online collaborators without holding cameras in front of their faces — an especially useful communication tool as much of the world engages in remote work or learning.

With C-Face, avatars in virtual reality environments could express how their users are actually feeling, and instructors could get valuable information about student engagement during online lessons. It could also be used to direct a computer system, such as a music player, using only facial cues.

“This device is simpler, less obtrusive and more capable than any existing ear-mounted wearable technologies for tracking facial expressions,” said Cheng Zhang, assistant professor of information science and senior author of “C-Face: Continuously

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Cornell researchers created an earphone that can track facial expressions

Researchers from Cornell University have created an earphone system that can track a wearer’s facial expressions even when they’re wearing a mask. C-Face can monitor cheek contours and convert the wearer’s expression into an emoji. That could allow people to, for instance, convey their emotions during group calls without having to turn on their webcam.

“This device is simpler, less obtrusive and more capable than any existing ear-mounted wearable technologies for tracking facial expressions,” Cheng Zhang, director of Cornell’s SciFi Lab and senior author of a paper on C-Face, said in a statement. “In previous wearable technology aiming to recognize facial expressions, most solutions needed to attach sensors on the face and even with so much instrumentation, they could only recognize a limited set of discrete facial expressions.”

The earphone uses two RGB cameras that are positioned below each ear. They can record changes in cheek contours when the wearer’s

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The best facial recognition cameras of 2020

Select home security cameras have facial recognition, an advanced option that lets you make a profile of friends and family members who regularly come to your house. Then, when the camera sees a face, it determines whether or not it’s someone in your list of known faces. 

The software can be hit or miss, based on a variety of factors, from lighting to changing hairstyles, wearing glasses one day but not the next — and more.

But one thing we know for sure is that this feature is becoming increasingly popular in our devices, not just in home security cameras, but also our phones and as efficiency tools helping to automate airport check-ins. As law enforcement becomes more invested in facial recognition technology, it’s already raising serious questions about privacy and

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Argentina is using facial recognition system that tracks child suspects, Human Rights Watch says

Publishing such information violates the Convention of the Rights of the Child, a U.N. agreement to which Argentina is a signatory, that says a child’s privacy should be respected at all stages of legal proceedings, said Hye Jung Han, a researcher and advocate in the children’s rights division at Human Rights Watch, who was the lead researcher on the report.

Argentina’s embassy in Washington did not respond immediately to a request for comment.

On a visit to Argentina in May 2019, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to privacy warned the Argentine government that CONARC’s database contained 61 children. By that October Argentina’s justice ministry said there was no children’s data in CONARC. But the report contends the practice continued after the U.N. visit, with 25 additional children added to the database.

An HRW review of CONARC also saw that the public information about the children was peppered

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CBP expands facial recognition program to international travelers at San Francisco and San Jose airports

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) this week announced the expansion of its Simplified Arrival program, which uses facial recognition to verify the identity of airline travelers arriving in the U.S. According to a press release, Simplified Arrival is now in use at San Francisco International Airport and Norman Y. Mineta San Jose International Airport following recent installations in Detroit and Houston.

As early as 2016, CBP began laying the groundwork for the program of which Simplified Arrival is a part: the $1 billion Biometric Entry-Exit Program. Through partnerships with airlines like Delta and JetBlue, CBP has access to manifests that it uses to build facial recognition databases incorporating photos from entry inspections, U.S. visas, and other U.S. Department of Homeland Security corpora. Camera kiosks at airports capture live photos and compare them with photos in the database, attempting to identify matches. When there’s no existing photo available for matching,

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Opponents of facial recognition technology in Detroit are not giving up without a fight

click to enlarge
DPD Chief James Craig inside the city's Real Time Crime Center at police headquarters. - STEVE NEAVLING

  • Steve Neavling
  • DPD Chief James Craig inside the city’s Real Time Crime Center at police headquarters.

Opponents of Detroit’s facial recognition system, which has misidentified suspects and led to their false imprisonment, plan to make some noise ahead of the city council’s scheduled vote to extend a contract on the technology’s software on Tuesday.

The protest group Detroit Will Breathe began an online petition calling for the city to stop using the technology, which opponents say is unreliable, racially biased, and constitutionally dubious. By Monday morning, the petition was close to reaching its goal of 1,600 supporters.




Before the 10 a.m. council meeting, protesters are also planning a car caravan protest to target the home of Councilman Andre Spivey, who expressed support for the technology

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