NASA, SpaceX Delay Crew-1 Mission Due To ‘Off-Nominal Behavior’ From Falcon 9

KEY POINTS

  • NASA and SpaceX’s crewed mission has been delayed to November
  • The agency cited “off-nominal behavior” from the Falcon 9’s engine
  • The delay can provide more time to ensure the mission’s safety

NASA and SpaceX’s Crew-1 has been delayed due to “off-nominal” behavior from the Falcon 9.

It was in May when NASA and SpaceX successfully launched astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station (ISS), marking the first time that American astronauts launched from American soil in nearly a decade. But that successful mission was just a demonstration and the first actual crewed operational flight of a Crew Dragon spacecraft, the Crew-1 mission, was set for a late October launch following several delays.

But on Oct. 1, NASA released a statement on the Crew-1 mission, noting a new target of “no sooner than early-to-mid November.” The agency cited “off-nominal behavior” from the Falcon 9’s first

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NASA delays commercial crew mission to study Falcon 9 engine issue

WASHINGTON — NASA is delaying the launch of the first operational SpaceX commercial crew mission to the first half of November to provide more time to review a problem during a recent Falcon 9 launch attempt.

NASA announced Oct. 10 the Crew-1 mission, which was scheduled to launch on a Falcon 9 in the early morning hours of Oct. 31 from the Kennedy Space Center, will now launch no earlier than early to mid-November.

The delay, the agency said, will provide more time for SpaceX “to complete hardware testing and data reviews as the company evaluates off-nominal behavior of Falcon 9 first stage engine gas generators observed during a recent non-NASA mission launch attempt.” NASA did not identify the specific launch attempt in question, but an Oct. 2 launch of a Falcon 9 carrying a GPS 3 satellite was scrubbed just two seconds before liftoff because of SpaceX Chief Executive

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Space Force says it will fly on a used Falcon 9 rocket for the first time

A Falcon 9 rocket launches the GPS III-03 mission in June, 2020.
Enlarge / A Falcon 9 rocket launches the GPS III-03 mission in June, 2020.

SpaceX

On Friday, the US Space Force said it would launch two critical Global Positioning System missions on a used Falcon 9 rocket next year.

Doing so will save the military $52 million, officials said, as SpaceX agreed to lower compensation for the two missions in return for flying used hardware. This represents a significant step by the Space Force toward validating the use of flight-proven first stages of a rocket for the most critical national security missions.

“We’re looking forward to this journey with SpaceX as we get even more experienced with them and reusable hardware,” said Walter Lauderdale, Space and Missile Systems Center Falcon Systems and Operations Division chief, in a call with reporters.

SpaceX previously launched a GPS mission for the US military (GPS III-01) in late 2018 and again in June of

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Watching This Falcon 9 Launch Is Like Riding a Rocket as You Would a Horse

Imagine Baron Munchausen riding a cannonball. Replace the cannonball with something that is longer, like say a rocket. Then scroll further down this page and watch the video you find there. This is exactly how one of the world’s biggest liars would have felt doing that.

SpaceX, Elon Musk’s company in charge with dreaming about humanity’s future away from this planet, has gotten us used to incredible feats. First, there was the reusable rocket booster, which took off and then landed either on pads or on funky named drone ships in the middle of the Ocean.

Then, we had a red car sent to space, for future generations or alien civilizations to find and wonder “what the hell is it?” And, more recently, we started seeing space launches from entirely new angles.

The video below shows the launch of a Falcon 9 rocket during the late August SAOCOM 1B mission.

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