Twitter flags Trump’s false claim about his COVID-19 immunity

By Jason Hoffman and Jordan Valinsky | CNN

Twitter just added a warning label to a tweet from President Donald Trump that claimed, without evidence, he is immune to coronavirus after his physician cleared him to resume public activities.

“A total and complete sign off from White House Doctors yesterday. That means I can’t get it (immune), and can’t give it. Very nice to know!!!” Trump wrote on Twitter Sunday.

He also claimed immunity in an interview on Fox News where he said he believes he will be immune for “maybe a long time, maybe a short time, could be a lifetime.”

There is no evidence that people are immune to coronavirus if they have been infected once, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC specifically cautions people not to assume they are immune.

Twitter’s warning label says the tweet “violated the Twitter Rules about spreading

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Tiny Changes Let False Claims About COVID-19, Voting Evade Facebook Fact Checks : NPR

Facebook labels posts that its fact checkers have found false, as in the screenshot on the left. On the right, a similar post had no label applied.

Screeenshot via Avaaz


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Screeenshot via Avaaz

Facebook labels posts that its fact checkers have found false, as in the screenshot on the left. On the right, a similar post had no label applied.

Screeenshot via Avaaz

Something as simple as changing the font of a message or cropping an image can be all it takes to bypass Facebook’s defenses against hoaxes and lies.

A new analysis by the international advocacy group Avaaz shines light on why, despite the tech giant’s efforts to stamp out misinformation about the coronavirus pandemic and the U.S. election, it’s so hard to stop bad actors from spreading these falsehoods.

“We found them getting around Facebook’s policies by just tweaking the misinformation a little bit,

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Vexing Space Station Air Leak Traced to Russian Module After False Alarm

The International Space Station.

The International Space Station.
Image: NASA

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station sprung to action late Monday night following concerns that a persistent air leak had grown in size. It turned out to be a false alarm, but during the event, the crew managed to trace the source of the leak to a Russian service module.

NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy and Roscosmos cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner were awakened by flight controllers late Monday and told to scour the Russian side of the International Space Station in an attempt to pinpoint the source of an air leak that appeared to be growing in size. Thankfully, the flight controllers were wrong, as they mistook a temporary temperature change aboard the ISS for a growing leak, according to NASA. The overall rate of the air leak, which was detected a year ago, is the same as it was before.

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A research team clears up 150 years of false assumptions — ScienceDaily

Some birds can perform amazing cognitive feats — even though their forebrains seem to just consist of lumps of grey cells, while mammalian forebrains harbour a highly complex neocortex. A study reveals for the first time amazing similarities between the neocortex of mammals and sensory brain areas of birds: both are arranged in horizontal layers and vertical columns.

These findings refute 150-year-old assumptions. The team, published its findings in the journal Science from 25. September 2020.

The largest brains

Birds and mammals have the largest brains in relation to their body. Apart from that, however, they have little in common, according to scientific opinion since the 19th century: mammalian brains have a neocortex, i.e. a cerebral cortex that’s made up of six layers and arranged in columns perpendicular to these layers. Avian brains, on the other hand, look like clumps of grey cells.

“Considering the astonishing cognitive performance that birds

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