Families Celebrate a Spooky Science & STEM Halloween

This post was contributed by a community member. The views expressed here are the author’s own.

The Cradle of Aviation Museum’s annual Family Science Nights return with the beloved “Spooky Science Night” with two socially-distant and limited attendance family sessions on Friday, October 30th at 5pm and 7pm. Each session is packed with stimulating family-fun, STEM activities and a Halloween parade to entertain the entire family. Tickets are $15.00 per person; $10 for Museum Members. All activities are included with admission. All tickets must be purchased in advance, no tickets will be sold at the door. Ideal for kids in grades K-5. Info is available at www.cradleofaviation.org/spook…

Activities include:

● Frankenstein Hands: Use your mad scientist skills to dissect frozen hands to discover what is trapped inside.

● Candy Catapults: Protecting your Halloween hoard is serious business. Construct and test your own catapults.

● Boo-Be-Gones: You ain’t afraid of

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Houston Arboretum rolls out Science Spooktacular for families in October

Take heart, Houston families. Not all of our Bayou City Halloween celebrations are lost due to the pandemic.

The Houston Arboretum & Nature Center is rolling out a week-long event for children and families October 19-24 called “Science Spooktacular: A Week of Halloween Fun!” Science Spookacular is actually being held in lieu of the Arboretum’s popular ArBOOretum fall festival, which won’t happen in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Science Spooktacular promises a cool Halloween alternative for kids with activities ranging from spooky bedtime stories to creating slime in a fun science show in both virtual and socially distant on-site offerings.

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“While we are disappointed that we can’t welcome our usual crowds to the beloved ArBOOretum Fall Festival, we believe Science Spooktacular will be an excellent alternative, spreading out science education and the fun of

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Families, Educators Dissatisfied With Computer Science Access

Computer science skills make it possible for students to engage, create and innovate in an increasingly technology-fueled society, and they prepare them for a quickly evolving job market, where computing occupations make up the majority of projected new jobs in STEM fields.

In the latest Google/Gallup study of the state of computer science education in U.S. schools, conducted in late January to early March, about half of U.S. students in grades 7 through 12 reported they had the opportunity to learn these skills at school. Forty-nine percent of students say they learned any computer science at school in the past year. Similar percentages of female and male students and Black, Hispanic and White students reported that they learned computer science at school.

Nearly Half of U.S. Students Learned Computer Science at School

Did you learn ANY computer science at school in the past year?


Overall Black
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In low-income Olneyville, a free Wi-Fi program could be a game-changer for families

Like many low-income families across the city, Brice didn’t have the budget for a high-speed internet connection, which can range anywhere from $30 to $100 a month depending on the quality.

“These are the things that make the difference between clean clothes and food,” Brice said. “Having cell phone access was more important.”

Brice was fortunate. Her employer wound up covering the cost of the family’s internet connection, and many schools provided students with a laptop or tablet to take home.

But as the lack of a reliable internet connection moves rapidly from being an inconvenience to a threat to one’s livelihood, momentum is growing in cities around the country to offer affordable – or free – Wi-Fi to residents.

In Providence, the first organization to step up with a plan was ONE Neighborhood Builders, a community development organization known primarily for building affordable housing, which is hoping to launch

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