Agency Reveals Details About Bennu, Including Finding Possible Lifeforms

KEY POINTS

  • OSIRIS-REx will collect samples from Bennu on Oct. 20
  • Bennu came from a parent body which had enough heat to keep water in its soils
  • Nightingale will be the mission’s primary sample site
  • The samples are set to be delivered back on Earth on Sept. 24, 2023

NASA has shared more information about asteroid Bennu and the agency’s mission to bring back samples of the asteroid’s surface through their OSIRIS-REx mission on Oct. 20. The 861-foot asteroid may contain ingredients for life.

In a recent article shared by NASA, the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) is set to travel to a near-Earth asteroid named Bennu to collect a 2.1-ounce sample and bring it back to Earth for further study. The mission plans to shed more light for scientists on how life began in the solar system, as well as improve their knowledge on asteroids that

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Finding vaporized metal in the air of an exoplanet

Vaporized metal in the air of an exoplanet
The top of the planet’s atmosphere is heated to a blazing 2,500 degrees Celsius, hot enough to boil some metals. Credit: NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon (STSci)

WASP-121b is an exoplanet located 850 light years from Earth, orbiting its star in less than two days—a process that takes Earth a year to complete. WASP-121b is very close to its star—about 40 times closer than Earth to the Sun. This close proximity is also the main reason for its immensely high temperature of around 2,500 to 3,000 degrees Celsius. This makes it an ideal object of study to learn more about ultra-hot worlds.


Researchers led by Jens Hoeijmakers, first author of the study and postdoctoral research fellow at the National Centre of Competence in Research PlanetS at the Universities of Bern and Geneva, examined data that had been collected by the high-resolution HARPS spectrograph. They were able to show that a

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Mario Molina, Nobel-winning Mexican chemist who made key climate change finding, dies at 77

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mario Molina, winner of the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1995 and the only Mexican scientist to be honored with a Nobel, died Wednesday in his native Mexico City. He was 77 years old.

Molina’s family announced his death in a brief statement through the institute that carried his name. It did not give a cause of death.

He won the prize along with scientists Frank Sherwood Rowland of the United States and Paul Crutzen of the Netherlands for their research into climate change.

Molina and Rowland published a paper in 1974 that saw the thinning of the ozone layer as a consequence of chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, chemicals used in a range of products.

Molina’s work contributed to the drafting of the first international treaty on the subject, the Montreal Protocol, which phased out the use of the chemicals. Later, he focused on confronting air pollution

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Finding a better route to treating social anxiety disorder may lie in another part of the brain, researchers suggest — ScienceDaily

Studies have long suggested that oxytocin — a hormone that can also act as a neurotransmitter — regulates prosocial behavior such as empathy, trust and bonding, which led to its popular labeling as the “love hormone.” Mysteriously, oxytocin has also been shown to play a role in antisocial behaviors and emotions, including reduced cooperation, envy and anxiety. How oxytocin could exert such opposite roles had largely remained a mystery, but a new UC Davis study sheds light on how this may work.

Working with California mice, UC Davis researches showed that the “love hormone” oxytocin can sometimes have antisocial effects depending on where in the brain it is made. (Mark Chappell/UC Riverside)

While most oxytocin is produced in an area of the brain known as the hypothalamus, some oxytocin is produced in another brain area known as the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, or BNST. The BNST is known

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SC woman says technology gap became obstacle to finding new job

“I’m out here in a new world where there’s a lot of technology I don’t have access to,” Marianetta Smith said. “It’s a struggle in every area.”

ROCK HILL, S.C. — A 62-year-old Rock Hill woman said she was denied benefits, after losing much of her income because of the shutdown. To make matters worse, she said she struggled to compete in the virtual job market without the proper skills or resources.

Marianetta Smith said she wants to work and is actively looking for jobs, but she said it’s been tough without a computer in this virtual world.

“I’m out here in a new world where there’s a lot of technology I don’t have access to,” Smith said. “It’s a struggle in every area.”

Smith said she’s among those left behind in the pandemic. In fact, even the Zoom interview with WCNC Charlotte almost didn’t happen. 

After several hiccups with

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Finding Zen In The Small Things

The miniaturization trend triggered by the ultra-compact form factor NUCs from Intel has emerged as a key driver in the growth of the PC market. Processor power efficiency is of paramount importance in this space, and AMD had been caught napping when the NUCs began to take flight. The introduction of the Zen microarchitecture in the Ryzen processors has scripted a remarkable turnaround for AMD. With leading core counts, the Ryzen processors have taken the HEDT market by storm. UCFF PC manufacturers, however, opted to play the wait and watch game, and it took a while before the embedded SoC versions of the first-generation Ryzens started appearing in the PC market. Last year, ASRock Industrial introduced one of the first Ryzen UCFF systems in the form of the 4X4 BOX-V1000M. This review attempts to figure out how the unit fares against the entrenched incumbents.

Introduction and Product Impressions

Small form-factor

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Meet the rat who just won a medal of bravery for finding 39 land mines

Big congratulations are in order for Magawa, an African giant pouched rat just awarded a gold medal for “life-saving bravery” for his work detecting dangerous land mines. 



a rodent looking at the camera: Now that's the face of a proud rat. Apopo


© Provided by CNET
Now that’s the face of a proud rat. Apopo

Born in Tanzania in 2014, Magawa has since age 2 enjoyed a highly successful career detecting land mines in Cambodia. So far, he’s found 39 land mines and 28 items of unexploded ordnance, according to Apopo, a global nonprofit started in Belgium that breeds and trains rats for humanitarian work such as sniffing out land mines and tuberculosis.  



a rodent with its mouth open


© CNET


Magawa’s impressive record makes him Apopo’s most successful working rat, or “HeroRat,” to date. It also makes him the first rat in UK animal charity PDSA’s 77-year history of honoring critters to win a coveted PDSA Gold Medal. Other animals to receive the award have included dogs, horses, a pigeon

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Finding Martian Microbes Could Require Digging Miles Underground

NASA’s Perseverance rover is flying to Mars as you read this sentence. It will land there in February 2021 and set aside rocks with promising signs of ancient life, for a future mission to pick up for analysis.

But what about current life on Mars? Are microbes embedded in the ice caps? Perhaps they are sheltering in water runoff in some crater? Or, as some scientists suggest, is life buried miles underground — a difficult spot for us to search, at best?

A new study is trying to figure out ways to hunt for life on worlds that have little or no running water at the surface. One easy answer, in theory, is to look to water reserves underground — and we are pretty sure Mars

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