Israeli defense giant picks five startups to develop future tech

JERUSALEM — Israel Aerospace Industries has chosen five startups to work with its engineers and experts to create products with the company, including sensors and artificial intelligence.

The five startups are QuantLR, Aigent-Tech, DST, Scopoli, and FVMat. Their work will focus on sensors for tracking people and objects, AI, monitoring systems, and landing gear, among other technologies.

IAI produces and supports a variety of defense systems for land, air and naval applications, such as a recent test of the Arrow 2 air defense weapon and a new sea-to-sea missile.

“IAI’s unique accelerator track allows the startups to work with IAI’s technology leaders, realize long-term business potential, leverage breakthrough technologies, and gain access to IAI’s customers,” the company said in a statement Oct. 1.

Among the companies selected, FVMat focuses on meta-materials, such as the production and design of materials with unique densities and stiffness. The firm will work with IAI

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Tobacco Giant Altria Is Securing Technology In New Frontier: Marijuana

Tobacco giant Altria made a very public splash with its $1.8 billion investment in recreational cannabis in 2019. Since buying in, the company has been much more quietly trying to claim a long-term stake in the marijuana industry by patenting cannabis technology, public records show. 

In late February of this year, Altria, the parent company of cigarette brands including Marlboro and Parliament, filed two patent applications for vaporizer devices specifically designed for cannabis, according to United States Patent and Trademark Office filings.

The company is also the current owner on two older vaporizer patents from the same inventor filed earlier and acquired through a sale, a company spokesman said. Those patents also specifically mention cannabis. 

The Altria cannabis devices have temperature controls meant to allow consumers to vaporize THC or CBD.

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Gaming Giant Roblox Preparing To Go Public Early 2021, Eyes $8 Billion Valuation: Report

KEY POINTS

  • Roblox is currently valued at $4 billion
  • It raised $150 million in series G funding in February
  • Roblox has more than 100 million monthly active users 

Gaming platform Roblox is getting ready to go public on the U.S. stock market early next  year, a move which may double its current valuation of $4 billion, Reuters reported.

The gaming company is in talks with investment banks to gauge whether it should debut on the market through a conventional initial public offering (IPO) or a direct listing, the report quoted sources as saying on the condition of anonymity. The company declined to comment to Reuters.

In an IPO, shares are created, underwritten an sold to the public, while in a direct listing, outstanding shares are sold with no underwriters involved. This is a rare method, which does not dilute the ownership of existing stakeholders.

This week, software maker Asana (NYSE:

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Giant Black Hole Discovered At Centre Of Cosmic ‘Spider’s Web’

Astronomers have discovered six galaxies ensnared in the cosmic “spider’s web” of a supermassive black hole soon after the Big Bang, according to research published Thursday that could help explain the development of these enigmatic monsters.

Black holes that emerged early in the history of the Universe are thought to have formed from the collapse of the first stars, but astronomers have puzzled over how they expanded into giants.

The newly discovered black hole — which dates from when the Universe was not even a billion years old — weighs in at one billion times the mass of our Sun and was spotted by the European Southern Observatory (ESO).

Scientists said the finding helps provide an explanation for how supermassive black holes such as the one at the centre of our Milky Way may have developed.

This is because astronomers believe the filaments trapping the cluster of galaxies are carrying

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There’s a giant ‘Green Banana’ off Florida’s coast, and researchers have finally gotten to the bottom of it

ocean
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

If you haven’t heard of the “Green Banana blue hole” you might imagine a tropical cocktail you can order in Key West, or a dessert you ordered after a night on Bourbon Street.


Forget that. This Green Banana is actually a mysterious sink hole. More specifically, it’s a huge, underwater cavern off the coast of Florida that humans had never fully explored—until last month.

Scientists say the Green Banana could hold clues to the formation of toxic red tides, algae blooms that are devastating to Florida’s shoreline, and the extent of the aquifer that supplies the state with most of its drinking water.

Maybe even the origins of life.

Blue holes—sink holes that form under water—are not unusual in the Gulf of Mexico. In the mid-1970s, a boat captain sailing about 60 miles west of Sarasota spotted one about 160 feet under water, and an unripe

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Study shows destabilizing effect of the giant gas planet — ScienceDaily

Venus might not be a sweltering, waterless hellscape today, if Jupiter hadn’t altered its orbit around the sun, according to new UC Riverside research.

Jupiter has a mass that is two-and-a-half times that of all other planets in our solar system — combined. Because it is comparatively gigantic, it has the ability to disturb other planets’ orbits.

Early in Jupiter’s formation as a planet, it moved closer to and then away from the sun due to interactions with the disc from which planets form as well as the other giant planets. This movement in turn affected Venus.

Observations of other planetary systems have shown that similar giant planet migrations soon after formation may be a relatively common occurrence. These are among the findings of a new study published in the Planetary Science Journal.

Scientists consider planets lacking liquid water to be incapable of hosting life as we know it. Though

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Scientists predict potential spread, habitat of invasive Asian giant hornet

Scientists predict potential spread, habitat of invasive Asian giant hornet
The world’s largest hornet, the Asian giant hornet has been encountered in the Pacific Northwest. New research at Washington State University predicts where the hornet could find suitable habitat, both in the U.S. and globally, and how quickly it could spread, should it establish a foothold. Credit: WSDA

Researchers at Washington State University have predicted how and where the Asian giant hornet, an invasive newcomer to the Pacific Northwest, popularly dubbed the “murder hornet,” could spread and find ideal habitat, both in the United States and globally.


Sharing their discoveries in a newly published article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team found that if the world’s largest hornet gains a foothold in Washington state, it could spread down much of the west coast of the United States.

The Asian giant hornet could also find suitable habitat throughout the eastern seaboard and populous parts of

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You can watch a US spy satellite launch on a giant Delta IV Heavy rocket tonight. Here’s how.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A new U.S. spy satellite will launch into space early Saturday (Sept. 27) on the mightiest rocket built by the United Launch Alliance (ULA): the massive Delta IV Heavy.

The booster is set to blast off overnight at 12:10 a.m. EDT (0410  GMT) from Pad 37 here at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to carry the classified NROL-44 satellite into orbit for the  the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO). You  can watch all the fiery action live online, courtesy of ULA. Launch coverage will begin about 20 minutes prior to liftoff, and you can watch the launch live here and on the Space.com homepage or directly via the ULA webcast. 

The mission has been delayed nearly a month after a rare, last-second abort on the launch pad on Aug. 29. According to ULA, the launch window lasts about 94 minutes.

Declassified: Vintage US spy satellites and

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Gnathomortis stadtmani, a giant lizard dubbed ‘Jaws of Death,’ terrorized Cretaceous seas

A type of seagoing lizard called a mosasaur that ruled the oceans at the same time dinosaurs dominated the land, it has now been given a name meaning “Jaws of Death.”

A new analysis published on Wednesday of fossils of the creature unearthed in 1975 has determined that it deserves to be recognized as a new genus of mosasaur based on skeletal traits including a unique combination of features in the tooth-bearing bones and the shape of an important bone in the jaw joint.

Its remains were discovered near Cedaredge, Colorado.

This Cretaceous Period creature previously had been classified as the species Prognathodon stadtmani. Because of its differences from other species of Prognathodon, Joshua Lively, curator of paleontology at the Utah State University Eastern Prehistoric Museum, gave it the new scientific name Gnathomortis stadtmani.

Gnathomortis is derived from the Greek and Latin words for “Jaws of Death.”

After other marine

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Mystery of giant proton pump solved

Mystery of giant proton pump solved
Complex I in the membrane, with resolved water molecules shown as red spheres, Quinone in black and NADH in gray. Credit: IST Austria

Mitochondria are the powerhouses of our cells, generating energy that supports life. A giant molecular proton pump, called complex I, is crucial: It sets in motion a chain of reactions, creating a proton gradient that powers the generation of ATP, the cell’s fuel. Despite complex I’s central role, the mechanism by which it transports protons across the membrane has so far been unknown. Now, Leonid Sazanov and his group at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have solved the mystery of how complex I works: Conformational changes in the protein combined with electrostatic waves move protons into the mitochondrial matrix. This is the result of a study published today in Science.


Complex I is the first enzyme in the respiratory chain, a series

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